BMB 110. Scientific Basis of Forensic Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic science topics including mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology are introduced and related to understanding specific topics in forensic analysis such as fingerprint and blood type analyses. Heavy emphasis is given to hands on, in class projects in which students learn to analyze and interpret experimental observations and outcomes.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 145. Introduction To BMB Research. 2 Credit Hours.

Students will collaborate on a research project and learn valuable laboratory skills. The goal for this course is to make students "research-ready" through an active, inquiry-based, platform for developing core competencies in biology, genetics, BMB (biochemistry & molecular biology), bioinformatics, scientific discourse and ethics.
Components: LAB.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 245. Foundations in BMB Research. 2 Credit Hours.

Students shadow a research assistant in the lab of a BMB faculty member and learn about the research projects and techniques used by the group. Students will assist in preparing reagents, conducting experiments, analyzing data and generating brief reports. Attendance in lab group meetings is expected. Students maintain a weekly online journal and will write a paper describing the research in the lab and proposing a research problem and approach to solve in BMB545.
Components: LAB.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BMB 251. Contemporary Topics in BMB. 1 Credit Hour.

Contemporary topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB). Using primary research articles that underlie scientific news in popular press, students participate in weekly discussions and give at least one group presentation. Students learn and develop practical skills in critical reading and presentation of primary research findings.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 260. Introduction to Biochemistry and Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours.

The composition of food and the composition and functioning of a typical cell a re described in chemical terms, leading to an understanding of how life process es such as digestion, and metabolism occur and are regulated at the level of in dividual molecule and reactions. Applications of biochemistry and nutrition ar e discussed.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

BMB 401. Biochemistry For The Biomedical Sciences. 4 Credit Hours.

The biochemical composition, structure, and cellular metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids are rigorously described, emphasizing problem solving strategies required of biomedical field applications.
Prerequisite: CHM 201 or CHM 222.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 402. Principles of Experimental BMB. 2 Credit Hours.

An active, inquiry-based, platform for developing core competencies in biochemistry & molecular biology, making students "research ready".
Corequisite or Prerequisite: BMB 401.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

BMB 411. Readings in BMB. 1 Credit Hour.

Students read and discuss one BMB primary research article each week and answer a set of questions meant to provoke critical evaluation of the work. The course introduces students to critical reading of the primary literature in BMB and is open to students at any level. Peer-mentoring and informal student-led instruction is central to the course.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 417. Nutrients, Enzymes, and Metabolic Flux. 3 Credit Hours.

How macronutrients (carbohydrates,protein, and lipids) and (ii) micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) are obtained in the diet, digested, absorbed, and processed. Then, students learn to "formulate" mechanisms of enzyme catalysis and inhibition, further applying to graphical analysis of authentic enzyme kinetic and binding data. Last, such analytical skills are used to more rigorously examine metabolic flux control points. Students finish this course with thorough mechanistic understanding of (i) macronutrient composition, intake, and energy production and (ii) requirements of micronutrients in controlling enzyme-catalyzed reactions that produce energy.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

BMB 501. Senior Seminars. 1 Credit Hour.

Students attend seminars of their own choice, presented by either visiting/residing faculty or graduate/postdoctoral students on recent research topics in BMB or any other discipline in the basic biomedical sciences. Students write short reports on these seminars and critically evaluate the presentations. This course can be taken more than once.
Prerequisite: BMB 401.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 506. Biomedical Case Studies. 1 Credit Hour.

Students explore topics in BMB in the context of solving problems presented in a clinical/biomedical framework. Students work in small groups and independently to acquire, critically evaluate, synthesize and present information.
Corequisite or Prerequisite: BMB 401.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 507. Protein Structure, Function, & Biology. 3 Credit Hours.

The physical characteristics and behavior of proteins are described, including structure, folding, dynamics, modifications, and interactions. In addition, experimental approaches to protein structure and function are addressed. Readings include both textbook assignments and current research articles, and a term paper is written and submitted for writing credit.
Prerequisite: BMB 401.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BMB 509. Molecular Biology of the Gene. 3 Credit Hours.

Biochemical processes involved in the flow of genetic information in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes are described, including DNA replication, repair, genetic recombination, RNA transcription and processing, protein synthesis, control of gene expression, cell differentiation, and recombinant DNA technology. Extensive classroom discussion is mandatory. Reading includes BMB primary research papers, course notes and a textbook.
Prerequisite: BMB 401.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

BMB 511. Topics in BMB. 3 Credit Hours.

Students independently explore the literature in BMB with guidance by a BMB Faculty mentor. BMB primary research literature in an area of mutual interest to the student and the Faculty mentor (usually a content expert in that area) is discussed. Students prepare a paper or other appropriate product (e.g. computer software, a structural model, a dynamic simulation) for evaluation. Writing credit is available for papers.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BMB 514. Genetics and Genomics: Principles, Mechanisms, and Use. 3 Credit Hours.

The quantitative and analytical problem solving, as well as spatial reasoning in genetics. The course will propose genetic hypotheses, identify genetic predictions, create genetic systems for challenging these predictions, and analyze genetic data to solve practical problems.
Prerequisite: BMB 401.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BMB 519. Epigenetics and Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours.

How epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression and (ii) how epigenetic modifications are propagated. Then, students explore how such epigenetic control and inheritance can be modulated through diet and nutrition. Class participation and attendance are required, since in class discussion will be largely based on emerging and late-breaking topics from recent literature.
Prerequisite: BMB 401.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

BMB 545. Research Problems in BMB. 3-12 Credit Hours.

Participation in the research laboratory of a faculty mentor to work on an independent research project. Students develop abilities to formulate good questions and sound hypotheses, design practical experiments, collect and analyze useful data, and make justifiable conclusions. Students maintain a weekly online journal, write a paper, and present their research in the lab. Two semesters of BMB 545 are required to write a thesis (pre-requisite for graduating with honors in BMB).
Components: LAB.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BMB 617. Readings in Molecular Biology. 1 Credit Hour.

Discussion of classical papers in molecular biology beginning with the concept of the gene and continuing into modern studies. Format consists of student presentations and group discussions.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BMB 645. Research Problems in Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology. 2-3 Credit Hours.

Laboratory research problems in various areas of biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular biology, including literature search, experimental design, data gathering, and evaluation of results. This course is the mechanism by which graduate laboratory rotations are done in preparation for selection of Ph.D. mentor.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BMB 680. Research Ethics. 0 Credit Hours.

The NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts stipulates that Institutions receiving support for National Research Service Award Training Grants are required to develop a program in the principles of Scientific Integrity. This program should be an integral part of the proposed training effort. The University of Miami School of Medicine has chosen to respond to this requirement with this course. This course must be taken during the first semester in the Department or Program. This is a six-hour course and will be given in two sessions of three hours each.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BMB 701. Research Journal Club.. 1 Credit Hour.

All registered BMB students must participate in the Journal Club/Seminar. Stud ents are required to critically review published paper(s) of their choice and d escribe in detail the findings described therein. Senior students will present their own research.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 702. Biochemical Science Seminar. 1 Credit Hour.

The Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) department has an active seminar program that meets on every Friday at noon. In this program seminars are presented by the BMB faculty (primary and secondary), invited speakers within the University of Miami and from other universities, government agencies, and industry. All BMB Graduate Students enrolled in this course will be required to attend this seminar and and will have informal interactions with speaker, and exchange ideas at lunch on the seminar day.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

BMB 705. Principles of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 1-6 Credit Hours.

The biochemical composition, structure, and cellular metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids are rigorously described, emphasizing problem solving strategies required of biomedical field applications.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 709. Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a continuation course for BMB 616. It covers essentially the same topics as BMB 616 but at a more advanced level. It brings the student to the forefront of research in Molecular Biology. The course material is discussed exclusively in the form of original research papers. Based on this experience, students are required to propose experimental approaches to biological problems and defend them.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BMB 710. Advanced Topics in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. 1-5 Credit Hours.

This course is offered by various faculty members in the department on a rotating basis depending upon their expertise. For example, an advanced topic course inNanomedicine offered by Dr. Deo and Dr. Dhar covers these topics through lectures.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BMB 714. Molecular Genetics. 4 Credit Hours.

This course deals with mechanisms and fundamental concepts of genetic inheritance. The first part of the course is devoted to the genetics of bacteria and bacteriophages. Topics include genetic implementation, recombination, suppression , transposition, conjugation, transformation, transaction, and regulation of prokaryotic gene expression. The second part of the course covers selected topic s in eukaryotic genetics (including molecular genetics of yeast, mitochondria, Drosophila, mice and humans). Problem solving is emphasized in homework and exam s. The objective of the course is to provide students with an appreciation of t he value of molecular genetics as a tool they can use to solve a wide variety o f problems in bio-medical research.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

BMB 715. Structural Biology and Applications to Drug Discovery. 2 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the relationships between structure and function in biological macromolecules, and how this knowledge has led to the discoveries of new drugs.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

BMB 716. Bioinformatics of Gene Regulation and Protein Function. 3 Credit Hours.

Among the skills required to become a successful interdisciplinary life scientist is the ability to navigate biological databases to better understand gene and protein function. Genome sequences contain the signals that guide differential gene expression and encode structural RNAs, regulatory RNAs and proteins. This course will introduce the tools, databases and evolutionary considerations that help us understand the regulation of gene expression and predict protein function. The biochemical and regulatory functions encoded in genomic DNA sequences will be explored using bioinformatics techniques including gene finding, BLAST searches, PubMed searches, high-throughput dataset mining, multiple alignments, phylogenic analysis, identification of conserved functional domains and motifs, assessment of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, gene context and co-occurrence analysis. secondary and tertiary structural analysis, metabolic and cellular modeling, and phenotypic analysis. The databases, tools and tutorials available at websites developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, EMBL-EBI, the Protein Data Bank, and others will be used as supporting course materials. Each week will have a set of online videos and instructions to complete before the weekly live lecture. The live lecture consist of a one hour slide presentation and one half-hour of Q&A discussions. Competency in bioinformatics will be assessed by a midterm and a final exam.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BMB 719. Fundamentals of Epigenetics. 3 Credit Hours.

The influence of nutrition on gene expression through modification of DNA and proteins in chromatin is described (i.e., epigenetics). Also, genetic variations, as well as the influence of bacterial flora of the digestive tract, are considered with respect to abilities to metabolize various dietary components. Students learn how to gather information about course topics and present their findings
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 720. Research in Residence. 0 Credit Hours.

Used to establish research in residence for the thesis for the master's degree after the student has enrolled for the permissible cumulative total in BMB 710 (usually six credits). Credit not granted. May be regarded as full time residence.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BMB 731. Special Work. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Special work, lecture, or laboratory or a combination of these, as determined by advisor in accord with student's individual interest.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BMB 810. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Credit Hours.

The student working on his/her master’s thesis enrolls for this credit. In most departments not to exceed six credits, as determined by his/her advisor.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BMB 830. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Required of all candidates for the Ph.D. The student will enroll for credit as determined by his/her advisor but not for less than a total of 24. Not more than 12 hours of BMB 730 may be taken in a regular semester, nor more than six in a summer session. Where a student has passed his/her (a) qualifying examinations, and (b) is engaged in an assistantship, he/she may still take the maximum allowable credit stated above.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BMB 840. Doctoral Dissertation- Post Candidacy. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Required for all PhD candidates. The student will enroll for credits as determined by the Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.
Components: DIL.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Summer.

BMB 850. Research In Residence. 0 Credit Hours.

Used to establish research in residence for the Ph.D., after the student has been enrolled for the permissible cumulative total in appropriate doctoral research. Credit not granted. May be regarded as full-time residence as determined by the Dean of the Graduate School.
Components: DIL.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.