FSS 190. First-Year Seminars in Social Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminars designed to introduce up to 25 freshmen to the Social Sciences. Topics will vary from year to year, as will faculty teaching the seminars.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FSS 191. First-Year Seminars in Social Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminars designed to introduce up to 25 freshmen to the Social Sciences. Topics will vary from year to year, as will faculty teaching the seminars.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FSS 192. First-Year Seminars in Social Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminars designed to introduce up to 25 freshmen to the Social Sciences. Topics will vary from year to year, as will faculty teaching the seminars.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FSS 193. First-Year Seminars in Social Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminars designed to introduce up to 25 freshmen to the Social Sciences. Topics will vary from year to year, as will faculty teaching the seminars.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FSS 195. First-Year Seminars in Social Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminars designed to introduce up to 25 freshmen to the Social Sciences. Topics will vary from year to year, as will faculty teaching the seminars.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FSS 197. First-Year Seminars in Social Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminars designed to introduce up to 25 freshmen to the Social Sciences. Topics will vary from year to year, as will faculty teaching the seminars.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FSS 199. First-Year Seminars in Social Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Especially designed for Foote Fellows, the BOOKS THAT MATTER seminar offers an opportunity to study major works of non-fiction in a seminar-style setting, under the guidance of faculty members from across the University. We examine important works which, by means of their strong, connected argumentation, challenge the way we respond to, interpret, and shape reality. Emphasis in the course falls mainly on the logical structure embedded deep within the text, and less on content per se, so that a student’s effort is not directed towards a reading of “great books” but rather the discovery of “significant arguments.” Our rationale is to address a fundamental need in education too often lost in the midst of other demands, interests, and requirements: by learning to read, question, and enjoy important intellectual studies of the past and present, students will be able to read, question, and enjoy what will be the influential books of non-fiction published in their lifetime, whether in public affairs, science, social science, economics, history, film and media studies, philosophy, psychology, etc. The course provides standards of measurement and value by which students can gauge how and why books succeed or fail on hard logical grounds.
Requisite: Hammond & Foote Fellow.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.