http://www.arc.miami.edu

Introduction

The School of Architecture offers a five-year, accredited professional program leading to the Bachelor of Architecture degree. The Bachelor of Architecture fulfills the educational requirements for professional registration. It offers specialized architectural study through upper-level studios and architecture electives, as well as opportunities for the study of liberal arts through the elective sequence.

The School of Architecture’s location in Coral Gables within the Miami metropolitan area provides an outstanding laboratory for research and advanced study; the challenges of conservation and development are intense in one of the nation’s fastest growing urban areas. These challenges result in an increasing demand for skilled professionals. Students have the opportunity to work with the faculty in the exploration of theoretical issues and in the resolution of practical problems. The School of Architecture values and sustains a creative, open and supportive environment, emphasizing personalized instruction in small classes and studio courses.

Mission

  • Prepare students for professional leadership and lifelong learning in architecture, urbanism and related fields. 
  • Preserve and develop knowledge for the profession through research and practice.
  • Share knowledge locally and internationally through community service.
  • Promote building and community design goals of environmental responsibility, social equity and economic sustainability.

Accreditation

The school is a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, and is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accreditation Board, who asks each school to include the following paragraph on professional degrees in all literature:

In the United States, most registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit professional degree programs in architecture offered by institutions with U.S. regional accreditation, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted an eight-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards. 


Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may require a preprofessional undergraduate degree in architecture for admission. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The University of Miami School of Architecture offers the following NAAB-accredited degree programs:
B.Arch. (171 undergraduate credits)
M.Arch I (3-year Track – 105 graduate credits)
M.Arch II (2-year Track – 60 graduate credits)

Admission

Applications for incoming freshmen are processed and reviewed by the Office of Admission. Enrollment in the School of Architecture is selective and highly competitive. Application to the Bachelor of Architecture program is requested by January 1st. Early application is encouraged.

Freshman

Admission decisions are based on the following factors: secondary school record, SAT/ACT score, counselor’s evaluation and the student essay. Portfolio submission is not required for entering freshmen, but is highly encouraged.

Transfer Students

The academic accomplishments of each transfer student will be evaluated on an individual basis. A 3.0 G.P.A. is required for transfer admission. A portfolio is required for advanced placement in the design sequence of the Bachelor of Architecture Program. Application deadline for the School of Architecture program is March 1st.

All transfer students requesting advanced placement in design must provide a portfolio of previous academic design and graphic work and three academic recommendations. Students accepted into third year design will be required to complete a transitional design course (ARC 301) during the summer prior to enrollment. The courses MTH 130 and PHY 103, or their equivalent are to be completed before admission into ARC 305.

Student Responsibilities

Students in the School of Architecture are responsible for planning their own programs and for meeting degree requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to understand and fully comply with all the provisions set forth in this Bulletin and written changes to their program of study. Students are provided assistance by advisors and faculty members.  Written requests for variation from program or school requirements are reviewed by a faculty committee.

Academic Progress and Probation

The School of Architecture will review each student’s record at the end of each semester. When a student’s semester or cumulative average is less than stated below, or progress toward degree completion is unsatisfactory, the student will be placed on academic probation or warning in accordance with School of Architecture policies and procedures. Students on probation are not permitted to enroll in more than 13 credit hours, shall meet on a monthly basis with their academic advisor, and may have a STOP placed upon their future enrollment until grades for work-in-progress are reviewed. First semester freshmen who have a semester grade-point average below 2.0 shall be placed on probation.

Credit Hours Earned CGPA
Fewer than 33 credit hours 2.0
33-64 credit hours 2.1
65-96 credit hours 2.2
More than 96 credit hours 2.3

Students must complete all Architecture Design studios with a grade of C- or higher.  Students receiving two consecutive C- grades in architecture design studios will have to repeat the later course. Students receiving a grade of D+ or lower in an architecture design studio must repeat the studio and will be restricted to a 15 credit hour semester load. The student will meet with an academic advisor on a monthly basis and will be reviewed prior to continuation.

Academic Dismissal

A student in the School of Architecture whose CGPA or progress toward degree completion falls below the level of the minimum standards of the University of Miami may be dismissed. In the School of Architecture this includes a student who receives three grades of D+ or lower in design courses.

Class Attendance and Absences

Class attendance is mandatory for all architecture courses; three unexcused absences constitutes grounds for dismissal from the course and/or a failing grade. Students are required to be present for an entire design review, therefore, students arriving late or departing early from class will be considered absent. Excused absences require written notification and are granted by the instructor.

Failing Grades or Incompletes

A required architecture course in which a student receives a failing grade must be repeated during the first subsequent semester in which the course is offered. Incompletes can be given only for reasons of serious illness or exceptional hardship.

Student Work

The University may retain selected student work and may place it in the architecture archives for exhibition, publication, or other use as the University deems appropriate. Each student in architecture is encouraged to maintain a design portfolio of every project undertaken throughout the five-year program.

Permission to Take Courses at Another University

A form is available from the Office of Academic Services and should be completed and approved PRIOR to off-campus enrollment. Students are encouraged to provide complete documentation for each course request form. Each student requesting transfer credit hour must supply the University of Miami registrar with certified transcripts. Additionally, each student should review transfer evaluations to be certain that all courses are correctly evaluated for credit hour. The proper transmission and transfer of credit hours is the responsibility of the individual student. The last 45 credit hours towards the degree must be completed at the University of Miami.

Changes to Academic Requirements

The School reserves the right to change academic requirements.

Computer Requirement

Undergraduate and graduate students entering the program are required to purchase their own computers for use in the design studio. The School of Architecture computing resources are accessible via a wireless network with an approved device and subject to School and University policy. Suggested system requirements are published on the School of Architecture web site.

Requirements for Graduation

Architecture students must complete a cognate in People and Society and a cognate in either Arts & Humanities or STEM.

Resources

The school’s resources, including state-of-the-art computer lab, digital fabrication laboratories and model shop are enhanced by the interdisciplinary opportunities offered by the other schools and colleges of the University of Miami. A distinguished faculty is joined each semester by internationally renowned visiting scholars and designers.

Other programs that offer academic opportunities for undergraduate architecture students include: 

  • the Historic Preservation Certificate
  • the Classical Architecture Certificate
  • the Master of Urban Design
  • the Master of Real Estate Development and Urbanism
  • the M.S. Architecture
  • the BSAE/MARCH
  • the BARCH/MBA

Dual Degree Programs

A six year dual degree program leading to a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering and a Master of Architecture is also available. The program is open to exceptional students who are admitted to the graduate program at the end of their junior year. Upon completion of this program, graduates are eligible for professional registration as both an engineer and an architect. 

Major in Architecture

Minor in Architecture

General overview of Foote Fellows

The Foote Fellows Honors Program recognizes the most educationally accomplished incoming students at the University of Miami. Foote Fellows have distinguished themselves both in and out of the classroom, are self-motivated, and think independently. Admission to the Foote Fellows Honors Program is by invitation.

Within the curricular framework of their school or college, Foote Fellows enjoy unmatched freedom and flexibility to explore a multitude of educational resources. Many Foote Fellows leverage this opportunity to take additional majors and/or minors and to study abroad. 

At each of the nine undergraduate schools at the University of Miami, a dedicated advisor helps Foote Fellows chart their academic path and attain access to distinctive learning opportunities at the University, such as special school-based seminars, faculty-mentored research, networking opportunities, and off-campus internships.

Foote Fellows also will be invited to join advanced, interdisciplinary Foote Fellow seminars taught by leading faculty members from across the University. An example is Books That Matter, a rigorous seminar in non-fiction reading that is offered in sessions for first-year and for upper-class students. Freshman Foote Fellows benefit from early move-in to the residential colleges. Further, Foote Fellows receive focused advising on post-baccalaureate distinguished fellowships and awards. 

The Foote Fellows Honors Program reflects the educational vision of former University of Miami President Edward T. Foote, who retired in 2000 after serving the University for twenty years.

Foote Fellows at U_SoA

Foote Fellows at U_SoA benefit from priority advising, enrollment and design studio selection (including the Partnership Studio which places students in local firms as part of their academic experience). The English and Cognates general education requirements (24 credits) are replaced with course topics of their choice so they may explore the educational resources of the University and create their own program of study.  Academic and professional career advising is personalized for each Foote Fellow to ensure a trajectory is established as early as the Sophomore year

Henry Adams Medal

Awarded in conjunction with the American Institute of Architects to the highest-ranking graduating student for scholarship and excellence in a professional architecture program.

Henry Adams Certificate

Awarded in conjunction with the American Institute of Architects to the second highest-ranking graduating student for scholarship and excellence in a professional architecture program.

Other honors, distinctions, and awards are presented annually for excellent student performance.

ARC 101. Architecture Design I. 6 Credit Hours.

The study of architecture as an intellectual and aesthetic discipline. Topics i nclude concept, site, form and technique. Corequisite: ARC 111, 121.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 102. Architecture Design II. 6 Credit Hours.

Architectural response to shelter, space and setting requirements. Topics inclu de programming, program analysis and design, anthropometrics, and architecture psychology.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 109. Introduction to Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

(Includes Design & History)Introduction to architectural ideas and principles including composition, space, form, function, history and methods of exploring architectural and urban design problems. Students will learn the relationship between two dimensional and 3 dimensional spaces through analytical drawing and model making. Course pedagogy includes weekly lectures in history and theory to better inform the design process. This course will encourage intuitive action, rapid visual analysis and interpretation.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ARC 110. Visual Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Concurrent with the ARC 109 course, the visual studies course explores Architectural drawing as a means of discovery, exploration, analysis and representation. Coursework begins with freehand drawing, in which students explore and refine their observation and representational skills, followed by an introduction to digital drawing and 3-d fabrication used in the profession today. The students will develop a portfolio in book format that illustrates the body of work produced during the three- week program.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ARC 111. Visual Representation I. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to architectural representation as exploration, selection coordination and acquisition of visual knowledge including analog and digital techniques. Topics include: orthographic and oblique projections, geometric constructions, sketching, shade and shadow, and basic knowledge of digital tools.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 112. Visual Representation II. 3 Credit Hours.

An intermediate course that continues methods integration introduced in Drawing I focusing on conical projections, color theory, measured drawings, Sketchup-up Pro, Autocad, and Revit.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 121. Architecture and Culture. 1 Credit Hour.

Architecture as an intellectual and aesthetic discipline. Focus on design theor y, language, typology, image, form, context, and case studies. Corequisite: ARC 101, 111.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 122. Architecture and Behavior. 1 Credit Hour.

Those aspects of environmental psychology which affect architectural design. St udies in human behavior and the design process, application of psychological fa ctors to the design of buildings and their environment. Corequisite: ARC 102,11 2.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 141. On-Site Survey of European Architecture and Urbanism. 3-6 Credit Hours.

On site introduction to architecture and the city with a historical review of m ost European periods from classical to contemporary. Survey of European archite ctural and urbanistic precedents in important selected locations. Elective cour se open to all majors; lecture and seminar format.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring & Summer.

ARC 203. Architecture Design III. 6 Credit Hours.

Architectural response to natural environment and site requirements. Focus on s ite analysis and design, climate, access and circulation, landscape, relation t o larger context. Corequisite: ARC 223.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 204. Architecture Design IV. 6 Credit Hours.

Building materials and structure as active constituents of architecture design. Focus on orientation, enclosure, low-energy responses, selection and assembly of construction materials, short and intermediate span structural systems. Corequisite: ARC 231.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 213. Visual Representation III. 3 Credit Hours.

An advanced representation course that builds on the tools and methods of visual Representation I & II while introducing students to more advanced techniques of three dimensional modeling that integrates analog and digital techniques. Topics covered include; composition, diagramming, research and analytical drawing, perspective, and the integration of digital tools.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 223. Architecture and the Environment. 1 Credit Hour.

Architectural response to natural environmental requirements. Focus on climate, control, natural energy use, ecosystems, energy flow, environmental interventi on, case studies of indigenous buildings.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 230. Building Technology I: Materials & Methods.. 3 Credit Hours.

Material characteristics of enclosure and structural systems, case studies in traditional and modern building construction; Topics include properties of building materials: wood, masonry concrete, steel and glass construction tech- niques; on-site and off-site processes; exterior finishes; assembles, detailing and basic building code concepts.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 231. Building Technology: Structural Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

Structural systems: the tectonics, patterns and behavior of the elements of building structures. Topics: Equilibrium, stability, vertical and lateral building envelope and financial considerations.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 267. History of Architecture I: Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance. 3 Credit Hours.

Studies of the history of architecture and urban design. Focus on religious and secular monuments and their settings, domestic architecture and infrastructure , regional constructional and compositional traditions from prehistory to the e nd of the sixteenth century. Corequisite: ARC 203.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 268. History of Architecture II: Baroque through Contemporary. 3 Credit Hours.

Studies of the history of architecture and urban design. Focus on religious and secular monuments and their settings, domestic architecture and infrastructure , regional constructional and compositional traditions from the end of the sixt eenth century through to the present. Corequisite: ARC 204.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 292. Introduction to Architecture Design I. 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of the architecture profession and introduction to architecture design f or non-architecture majors. Role, opportunities, vocabulary, visual awareness, techniques and procedures of design.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 293. Introduction to Architecture Design II. 3 Credit Hours.

Continuation of ARC 292 and an introduction to the interactions between archite cture and the engineering disciplines for non-architecture majors. Theories of building and site design, technology as an integral component of design, progra m, site, climate and methodology.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 294. Introduction to the Development of Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to architecture for non-architecture majors. Vocabulary, themes, p rinciples and processes of design, cultural, social, economic and technological influences demonstrated through historic examples.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 301. Architecture Design. 3 Credit Hours.

Comprehensive building and site design for students transferring into the archi tecture program at third year level. Topics include human, environmental, cultu ral and technological factors.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 305. Architecture Design V. 6 Credit Hours.

Environmental systems and structure as active constituents of architectural de sign. Topics include the integration of enclosure, structure, environmental and mechanical systems in intermediate and long span structures. Corequisite: ARC 362, CAE 213.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 306. Architecture Design VI. 6 Credit Hours.

Government and finance as active constituents of architecture design. Topics in clude zoning regulations, building codes, principles of public health, safety a nd welfare, market and feasibility studies. Corequisite: ARC 351, CAE 313.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 323. On Site Study of Selected Architecture and Urbanism. 3-6 Credit Hours.

On site study of specific architectural and/or urbanistic precedents at selecte d locations. Focus on specific period(s) and/or architect(s). Elective course o pen to all majors.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring & Summer.

ARC 324. On Site Graphic Analysis of Selected Architecture and Urbanism. 3 Credit Hours.

On site analysis and illustration of specific architectural and/or urbanistic p recedents at selected locations. Diagrams, sketches, and drawings recording, an alyzing and evaluating buildings and places. Focus on specific period(s) and/or architect(s). Elective course open to all majors.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring & Summer.

ARC 362. Environmental Building Systems I. 3 Credit Hours.

Environmental and Safety Systems. Topics include mechanical - HVAC and conveyor s; plumbing - fixtures and pipes; safety systems - fire safety and emergency an d signal systems. Corequisite: ARC 305.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 363. Environmental Building Systems II. 3 Credit Hours.

Principles and applications of light and acoustics. Topics include natural and artificial light - planning for sunlight, problems and solutions for interior a nd exterior illumination; sound - properties, problems and solutions in new and existing spaces. Principles and applications of electrical equipment and wirin g design. Corequisite: ARC 306.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 371. Ancient Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

History of architecture and human settlements. Western European prehistory, Egy pt, Mesopotamia, Persia, Aegean and Mediterranean, Greece, Rome.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 373. Early Christian, Byzantine, and Medieval Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

History of architecture and human settlements. Early Christian and Byzantine ar chitecture in Italy, the Near East, Greece, North Africa, Eastern Europe, Medie val architecture in Western Europe.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 382. Architecture and Culture in Italy. 3 Credit Hours.

A cultural and historical framework in preparation for participation in the Rome program. A range of topics, including architecture, art, history, cinema, literature and politics presented by University faculty from a variety of disciplines. Required for participation in the Rome Program.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 390. History of Cities. 3 Credit Hours.

Historical overview of the origin of cities and the development of cities in the East, West, and New World. Focus on the nature of the industrial revolution and the development of the industrial city and contemporary urban settlements.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 407. Architecture Design VII. 3-6 Credit Hours.

Elective component: student and faculty select areas of in-depth study. Topics include building types, environment, energy, community design.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 408. Architecture Design VIII. 3-6 Credit Hours.

Elective component: student and faculty select areas of in-depth study. Topics include building types, environment, energy, community design, etc.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 452. Management of Professional Practice. 3 Credit Hours.

Overview of the practice and the profession, legal and ethical concerns, business types and management practices, traditional and non-traditional practices and services, contracts and contractual relationships.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 475. Colonial Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

History of architecture and human settlements. Colonial Architecture from the 1 6th through the 19th centuries in North and South America, the Caribbean, India and Africa.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 476. 19th and 20th Century Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

History of architecture and human settlements. America and Europe during the 19 th and 20th centuries; cultural, technological and theoretical development.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 481. Special Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

Group or individual investigations of significant architectural issues, offered by special arrangement only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 482. Special Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

Group or individual investigations of significant architectural issues, offered by special arrangement only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 483. Special Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

Group or individual investigations of significant architectural issues, offered by special arrangement only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 500. Architecture Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

Architecture and Culture/Architecture and the Environment Survey of primary texts in theory of architecture. Part 1: Focus on design theory, language, identity, tectonics and context. Part 2: Focus on environmental theory, sustainability, and ecosystems.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 501. Architecture Design and Theory I. 6 Credit Hours.

Cultural, human and environment component and architectural responses to these: Social and aesthetic concepts, architectural psychology, climatic principles, programming analysis and design.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 502. Architecture Design and Theory II. 6 Credit Hours.

Technology component; materials, structure, and environmental control systems as a framework for architectural design. Construction materials and methods, structural systems, mechanical systems.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 503. Architectural Design and Theory III. 6 Credit Hours.

Legal and economic component; government and finances as active constituents of architecture design. Zoning regulations, building codes, principles of public health, safety and welfare, market and feasibility studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 504. Architecture Design and Theory I. 6 Credit Hours.

Cultural, human and environment component and architectural responses to these: Social and aesthetic concepts, architectural psychology, climatic principles, programming analysis and design.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 507. Architecture Design. 6 Credit Hours.

Elective component: student and faculty select areas of in-depth study. Topics include building types, environment, energy, community design, etc.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 509. Architecture Design IX. 3-6 Credit Hours.

Elective component: student and faculty select areas of in-depth study. Topics include building types, environment, energy, community design, etc.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 510. Architecture Design X. 3-6 Credit Hours.

Elective component: student and faculty select areas of in-depth study. Topics include building types, environment, energy, community design, etc.
Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 511. Visual Representation I. 3 Credit Hours.


Components: STU.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 512. Advanced Visual Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Drawing as a means of analyzing and recording visual experience. Composition, f orm, light, color and drawing as a primary device in the mental registration of visual experience.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 513. Computing. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to new electronic design tools and technology available to architects today. Lectures on the history and future of computing in the profession.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 514. Michelangelo. 3 Credit Hours.

Drawing as a form of research across mediums to understand historical research and interpretation of Michelangelo's work.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 515. Computer Modeling. 3 Credit Hours.

Three-dimensional, computer modeling, and rendering. Lecture, problem solving e xercises and laboratory.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 516. Architectural Watercolor Renderings. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will use freehand drawing and watercolor painting as a vehicle to s tudy and record the urban and architectural conditions of Coral Gables and othe r South Florida sites. Particular emphasis will be placed on the analytical pot ential of sketches (recording space, light, surfaces and color).
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 517. Construction Documents. 3 Credit Hours.

Working drawings and specifications. Form, content and role of constituent part s of working drawings and specifications by using case studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 518. Documentation of Historic Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

Principles of preservation and restoration, research methods, measured drawings , surveying methods, case studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ARC 519. Architecture and Color. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the theory and practice of color and its application to architectural design. Topics include color history from Newton through Alber, t he relationship between color practice in science versus art, and the disciplin e of color in architecture from the Neoclassical movement through the Modern Mo vement.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ARC 523. Interior Architecture Design. 3 Credit Hours.

Principles and technical components of interior design. Topics include activity , analysis, finishes, furniture, fixture, lighting, and acoustics.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 524. Selected Topics in Interior Architecture Design. 3 Credit Hours.

Principles and technical components of interior design. Topics include interior volumetrics, finishes, furnishings and lighting.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 525. Landscape Arch Design I. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis and design of landscape spaces. Studies in historical precedent, garde ns, parks, plazas, squares and response to architectural context.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 526. Landscape Arch Design II. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis and design of landscape spaces. Topics include ecological principles, landforms and plant materials.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 527. Architecture Photography. 3 Credit Hours.

Photography with emphasis on architectural subjects. Introduction to visual pri nciples, photographic equipment, materials, and techniques.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 528. Historic Preservation. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic design principles for the rehabilitation of historic buildings. Evaluatin g character-defining details; significance analysis; context of setting issues within historic districts; applying the Secretary of the Interior's Standards f or rehabilitation.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 529. Research in Design-Methods and Procedures. 3 Credit Hours.

Application of research methods and procedures to design issues. Historical, de scriptive, analytic, experimental research methods; tools for data manipulation and communication.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 531. Building Technology II: Structural Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

Structural systems: The tectonics, patterns and behavior of the elements of building structures. Topics: Equilibrium, stability, vertical and lateral loads, building envelope and financial considerations.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 532. Building Structures I. 3 Credit Hours.

The structural behavior of simple frame structures. Topics include techniques to determine basic system layout and preliminary dimensioning of key subsystems and members.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ARC 533. Building Structures II. 3 Credit Hours.

The structural behavior of complex structures. Topics include prestressed systems, waffle and space trusses, curved structures and longspan buildings.
Prerequisite: ARC 532.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Summer.

ARC 534. The Palazzo in Italian Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the development of the Renaissance and Baroque palazzo in Rome and other important centers of art and culture. Emphasis on the socio-political context.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 535. Historic Italian Urbanism. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of Italian cities and towns from medieval to contemporary times, including a comparative analysis of history and form.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 536. Italian Gardens. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of Italian garden design during the Renaissance, Baroque and Mannerist periods. Emphasis on historical and political context.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 537. Research in Rome. 3 Credit Hours.

An exploration of Roman history, architecture and urban form through lectures, on site study and drawing assignments. Emphasis on chronological and spatial sequence of development.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 541. Seminar on Town Design. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the lexicon of urbanism; analytical presentations of the concep ts of: region, town, neighborhood, corridor, district, and building type; inter disciplinary presentations, review, and criticism of current town and urban des ign projects.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 542. Seminar on Housing. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to domestic building typology; exploration of the concepts of low, medium, and high density housing with attention to social, environmental, and economic issues; presentations of current case studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 543. Seminar on Retrofit of Suburbia. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the critical reconstitution of the city; theory and history of the concepts of revitalization and redevelopment; presentations, review, and cr iticism of current case studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 545. Urban Composition. 3 Credit Hours.

Survey and analytical review of urban rooms as the vessel of human activity in urban culture. Study of proportional and compositional aspects of urban rooms t ogether with economic, social, and cultural factors. Readings and discussion fo rmat.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 546. Studies of Havana. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis of the physical structure of a major city and its environments includi ng an exploration of its history and iconographic themes, mapping and building studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 547. Architecture and Urban Identity. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the relationship between architecture and urbanism focusing on the way s by which architecture provides urban identity and image of place. Case studie s relating monuments, fabric and urban plans to their culture, time and place. Lecture and seminar format.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 548. Seminar in Community Development. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the contemporary context for the development of the physical environme nt. Examination of public, private and third sector implementation of building and community design. Format: guest speakers, readings, discussions, and semina r.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 550. Professional Lecture Series. 3 Credit Hours.

Exposure to the various professional disciplines in South Florida that make contributions to the design process. Case study analysis and evaluation of current building project, from time of initial formulation through completion, including research, diagrammatic studies, site visits and lectures.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 551. Contemporary Theories of Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

Theoretical basis of modern architecture and different present currents and mov ements. Agrarianism, technism, orthodoxy, brutalism, scientism, revivalism, con sumerism, rationalism, classicism.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 553. Structural Design Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

Relationship of structural systems to architectural design. Case studies in the ories of structure, form and construction.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 554. Architecture of South Florida. 3 Credit Hours.

History of architecture and human settlements. Studies of significant architect ural landmarks and urban design of the South Florida Region, chronological grow th of Miami, Miami Beach, Coral Gables, Key West and Palm Beach.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 557. Design and Fabrication Techniques: Carved Panels. 3 Credit Hours.

Design, construction and detailing of wood as applied to furnishings and interi ors. Focus: low and high relief carved wood panels. Workshop based course inclu ding research, exercises, measuring, documentation and a final project.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ARC 558. Theories of Landscape Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

Leading theories of landscape architecture which have influenced current consid erations of nature, landscape and design.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 568. History of Architecture II: Baroque through Contemporary. 3 Credit Hours.

Studies of the history of architecture and urban design. Focus on religious and secular monuments and their settings, domestic architecture and infrastructure , regional constructional and compositional traditions from the end sixteenth c entury through to the present. Corequisite: ARC502.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 569. Directed Readings. 3 Credit Hours.

A structured program of readings and essays organized by the student and his/her graduate supervisor constituting a preparation for graduate research in the student's chosen area of interest.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 570. Modern Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

History of architecture, landscape, and city design in the modern era.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 572. Selected Topics in World Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

History of architecture and human settlements. Islamic Near East, North Africa, Hindu and Buddhist India, Nepal, S. E. Asia, China, Japan, Pre-Columbian America.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 574. Renaissance Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

History of architecture and human settlements. Renaissance and Baroque architec ture in Italy, France, Spain and Portugal, Great Britain, Austria, Germany, and neighboring countries.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 577. The Architecture of Alvar Aalto. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the architecture of Alvar Aalto through the analysis of selec ted buildings.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ARC 578. Italian Rationalist Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

History of Italian architecture and urban design between 1914 and 1950: cultural, technological, and theoretical developments; relationship between architecture, politics and propaganda; related survey of the period in other countries (France, German, Soviet Union).
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ARC 581. Special Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Group or individual investigations of significant architectural issues, offered by special arrangement only.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 582. Special Problems. 3-6 Credit Hours.

Group or individual investigations of significant architectural issues, offered by special arrangement only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 583. Special Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

Group or individual investigations of significant architectural issues, offered by special arrangement only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 584. Special Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

Group or individual investigations of significant architectural issues, offered by special arrangement only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 585. Special Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

Group or individual investigations of significant architectural issues, offered by special arrangement only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 586. Special Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

Group or individual investigations of significant architectural issues, offered by special arrangement only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ARC 590. History of Cities. 3 Credit Hours.

Historical overview of the origin of cities and the development of cities in the East, West, and New World. Focus on the nature of the industrial revolution and the development of the industrial city and contemporary urban settlements.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 593. Computer Animation. 3 Credit Hours.

Explores the use of computer animation and advanced visualization techniques in architecture with emphasis on texture and lighting, spatial choreography and s tory-boarding.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ARC 594. Geographic Information Systems in Urban Design. 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in urban design. Principles of GIS and their application to spatial analysis, data management and visualiz ation.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ARC 596. Interactive Multimedia in Design. 3 Credit Hours.

Integration of text, video, sound, and computer graphics to create an interactive electronic information medium.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.