Department Code:  HSM

Introduction

The Health Sector Management and Policy major area of specialization is designed for students seeking to pursue careers in health management and policy in any of a variety of health care organizations and public settings. The curriculum enables students to gain skills and understanding in the specialized language of health care and to comprehend concepts of management, financing, politics, law, and ethics as applied to the health care sector. The major area of specialization is also ideal for students aspiring to earn advanced degrees in health administration, health economics, medical sociology, public health, or law.

Educational Objectives

The purpose of the major area of specialization in Health Sector Management and Policy is to provide the business student with a basic understanding of the management, economic and financial structure, as well as the legal, ethical, and governmental policy aspects of the health care industry. Appropriate candidates for the major area of specialization in Health Sector Management and Policy include School of Business Administration students interested in exploring the health care sector, working in the legal, management, or policy-making aspects of the health care sector or those wanting to have an augmentation to their pre-med, pre-law or pre-MBA, MPA or MPH studies, as well as those who expect to pursue a Ph.D.  The minor area of specialization in Health Sector Management and Policy is available to students from all UM schools and colleges. Members of the Department are prepared to counsel students in the selection of courses and in other matters relating to the preparation for careers.

Minor in Health Sector Management and Policy

HSM 270. Introduction to Health Sector Management and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course develops a basic understanding of the elements of the health services industry in the United States. It examines the history of the components of our health care system and moves on to current and potential future system dynamics. Sectors include physician services, hospital and hospital systems, long-term care providers, mental health services, and pharmaceutical services. Basic concepts associated with the financing of health services are examined as well as indemnity insurance, capitation, and the role of managed care, consumer driven health care and integrated delivery systems in theory and practice. The role of government is explored as well.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

HSM 310. POPULATION HEALTH. 3 Credit Hours.

Population health is emerging as a field of study of health determinants, a concept of health, and a goal of achieving measurable improvements in the health of a defined population. These populations can encompass geographic regions, such as communities, states, or nations, but can also be groups, including groups based on need, employees, ethnicity, members of Accountable Care Organizations, and other populations with relevance to policymakers. In this course, students will gain an understanding of the determinants of population health, health outcomes of the population, and policies and interventions that link the determinants and outcomes.
Prerequisite: HSM 270 Or MGT 270.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

HSM 320. Health Care Demand and Supply. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of health economics, and cover the principles of microeconomic theory as they relate to health care. No previous background in economics is assumed. The basic framework of this course is to introduce students to individual behavior (demand), firm behavior (supply), and how these forces interact to determine market prices that allocate scarce health care resources. Students will learn how policies, such as the Affordable Care Act of 2010, can be viewed via the lens of health economics.
Prerequisite: HSM 270.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

HSM 350. Production and Consumption of Health and Health Care. 3 Credit Hours.

All societies must deal with the allocation of scarce resources. In our society, primary reliance is placed on markets and prices. This course will introduce students to the application of economic principles and production and consumption of health and health care. Some of the major topics include the production of and demand for health, demand for and supply of medical care, uncertainty and insurance, models of physician and hospital behavior, externalities and market failure, the role of government in health and medical care, and economic evaluation of health care services and interventions. Health economics concepts will be linked to current policy debates at the state and federal levels. Numerous real-world applications and case studies will be presented to demonstrate decision-making techniques for health care organizations and consumers.
Prerequisite: HSM 270 Or MGT 270 And ECO 211 And ECO 212.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

HSM 499. Special Topics. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Topics in area of specialization. Approval of department required at time of registration.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

HSM 601. Essentials of Health Care Administration. 1-4 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the basic elements of thehealth services industry in the United States. A systems approach will be used utilizing a historical perspective as a basis and moving on to current and potential future system dynamics. This course will allow the student to understand the health care system, including physician services, hospital and hospital systems, long-term care providers, mental health services, and pharmaceutical services. Health care labor markets will be examined. Various elements associated with the financing of health services will be analyzed as well including indemnity insurance, capitation, and the role of managed care, accountable care organizations, and consumer driven health care in theory and practice. The role of government and its impact on our health care system will be understood as well. Alternative health care systems looked at from a global perspective will be analyzed, and possible application to the U.S. health care system will be evaluated.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.

HSM 610. Management and Economics of Healthcare. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide the student insight into organizational andeconomic aspects of the various sectors and agents within the health care industry. Exploration will allow us to understand how such aspects in turn affect performance measured in terms of managerial, economic and ethical criteria.The course will explore issues associated with scarce resource allocation anddistributional justice. We will examine the organizational structure, behavior,interactions between structure and behavior, and the resultant performance of thevarious sectors of the health care industry, including models of hospital management behavior, operations of alternative services markets, and the market for physicians and physician service as well as the market for nurses. Aspects of risk will be examined and the impact of governance on economic behavior and performance in the marketplace.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.

HSM 620. Population Health. 1-4 Credit Hours.

Role of public and private institution in health promotion, health care delivery, and health insurance. Explains how and why government and society attempt to influence health-related behaviors and the resulting effects on individuals’ lives.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

HSM 640. Health and Medical Decision Making. 1-4 Credit Hours.

Population health is emerging as a field of study of health determinants, a concept of health, and a goal of achieving measurable improvements in the health of a defined population. In this course, students will gain an understanding of the determinants of population health, health outcomes of the population, and policies and interventions that link the determinants and outcomes while exploring the business case for health.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

HSM 655. Public Policy and Health. 1-4 Credit Hours.

Role of public and private institution in health promotion, health care delivery, and health insurance. Explains how and why government and society attempt to influence health-related behaviors and the resulting effects on individuals’ lives.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

HSM 683. Professional Skills Development. 2-4 Credit Hours.

This seminar immerses students in experiences designed to enhance their professional skills. The course incorporates presentations by health care administrators including lectures on current topics in health care administration and health services research, facilitates faculty and student interaction via discussion of relevant peer-reviewed journal articles, and includes site visits to health care facilities.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.

HSM 687. Health Care Organization, Economics & Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will allow understanding and analysis of issues associated with scarce resource allocation and the evolutionary movement from patient focused to population focused to patient centered care including Accountable Care Organizations and the concept of value vs. volume. Students will understand and analyze the organizational structure, behavior, interactions between structure and behavior, and the resultant performance of the various sectors of the health care industry, including models of hospital management behavior, operations of alternative services markets, physicians as small businesses, group practices and employees, the market for physician services, the market for nurses, the issue of risk and risk sharing, and the impact of government on organization, behavior and performance in the market place. Principles of medical ethics will be learned and understood and application, analysis and creative resolution of ethical dilemmas will be undertaken. The relationships between organization, incentives, and ethical performance will be analyzed using modern issues and cases that health care managers, policy makers and providers face in the industry today. The interrelationships between managerial and system goals, economic parameters, and moral and ethical considerations will be applied and analyzed as well.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

HSM 699. Health Care Administration Internship. 2-4 Credit Hours.

The internship is an integral part of the Health Care Administration curriculum and will be planned in terms of the intern’s abilities, needs, and interests. The internship experience is strengthened by the relationships with the SBA’s Health Advisory Board, Executive MBA in Health Sector Management and Policy program alumni, and the University of Miami Hospital, Students preparing for an internship experience must be active in planning their internship by seeking advice and assistance from their faculty advisor.
Components: IND.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.