Dept. Code: EPS

Bachelor of Science in Education: Human and Social Development

The major in Human and Social Development (HSD) focuses on the promotion of healthy development and well-being. It prepares students to work with people in multiple contexts and settings:

  • health and human services
  • schools, universities, and community programs
  • government and non-government agencies
  • grass-roots movements

By exploring the scholarly and practical interconnections among individual, interpersonal, social, and community approaches to change, students learn to identify barriers to well-being and to implement effective change-oriented strategies and policies. HSD coursework emphasizes theory, research, and skills. It culminates in a practicum in a setting related to students’ area of interest and prepares them for both graduate studies and careers.

Students choose between three areas of concentration (tracks).

  • Track I: Individual and Relational Development (Track Code: HSDI)
    This track emphasizes individual, relational, and family well-being. Focusing on context and diversity in mental health and on strength-based, preventive, and empowering approaches, courses cover family studies, counseling theories and techniques, interviewing skills, and the basics of human service work. Students are well-prepared for graduate study in the helping professions and careers in health and human services.
  • Track II: Community and Program Development (Track Code: HSDC)
    This track promotes healthy individual and community development by emphasizing how social, institutional, and community dynamics affect personal well-being. Stressing the role of non-government agencies in fostering well-being for people with diverse backgrounds, HSDC prepares students to diagnose institutional and community challenges and offer strategies for positive change. Courses include community-focused planning, needs assessment, and change strategies and nonprofit program development, implementation, and evaluation. Students are well prepared for graduate study in community psychology and public policy and careers in community organizations.
  • Track III: Human and Social Development Studies (Track Code: HSDS)
    This is a general track which offers a menu of courses relating to individual and community development. HSDS students are free to combine classes from the Individual (HSDI) and Community (HSDC) tracks. This track meets the needs of students who seek greater flexibility in course work and are less concerned with specializing in the individual or community tracks.  

HSD students must declare an approved second major or a minor either in the School of Education or through any other school or college.

Requirements for Graduation

Bachelor of Science in Education

I. Candidates for B.S.Ed. in the School of Education and Human Development must complete the credit hours of work and achieve the quality point average specified for students in the University at large as stated in the section ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES, subject to regulations concerning the major specified in departmental and program sections of this Bulletin.

Exempted is interpreted to refer exclusively to those exemptions provided under the following headings:

  • Advanced Standing and Placement (Credit Hour Granted);
  • Credit by Examination;
  • Advanced Placement (by proficiency examination);
  • Statement of Foreign Language Requirements;

II. Except where a required course is one designated to correct a deficiency in his/her college preparation, the student may apply the credit hours of any required course from which he is exempted toward the credit hours specified for that subject as a general requirement for graduation and, upon payment of a recording fee, toward the 120 credit hours required for graduation. (See Departmental Proficiency Examinations.) An exemption may be granted for ENG 105, but these credit hours may not be applied toward the 120 credit hours required for graduation.

III. Credit Only. Only free electives may be taken under this option. Courses which satisfy the major, minor, the distributions of the School, the General Education Requirements of the University or any course for which a C or better is required may not be taken for credit only.

IV. Transferred credit hour may not count toward the completion of a major without the written approval of the Assistant Dean of the School of Education and Human Development.

V. Required Areas of Study

  1. English Composition 3 – 6 credit hours
    Students fulfill this requirement by satisfactorily completing ENG 105 and ENG 106 or its equivalent. Appropriate Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) scores in English composition may be used to satisfy the ENG 105/ENG 106 requirement. An appropriate score on the SAT or ACT verbal examination may earn a student exemption from, but not credit hour in, ENG 105. Appropriate scores on other tests determined by the Department of English may earn a student exemption from, but not credit hour in, ENG 105. Courses satisfying the English Composition requirement may not be used to fulfill the Advanced Writing and Communication Requirement.
  2. Mathematics
    B.S.Ed. degree candidates in the Department of Educational and Psychological Studies are required to take EPS 351. This course fulfills a Math requirement for the HSD major. Prior to taking EPS 351, students must complete MTH 101 or be exempt from MTH 101 based on any of the following tests: AP, IB, or an examination administered by the Department of Mathematics.
  3. Foreign Languages (not applicable)

Areas of Knowledge and Cognate Requirements

The University of Miami’s General Education requirements ensure that graduates have acquired essential intellectual skills and have engaged a range of academic disciplines.  All new students will fulfill the General Education requirements by selecting a Cognate, which is a cluster of courses arranged by their content, field and interest.

  • A cognate is a group of at least three related courses for at least 9 credit hours.
  • The courses in a cognate are related in a topical, thematic, interdisciplinary, sequential, or other such fashion, so that completion of a cognate provides coherent depth of knowledge in the area.
  • Students must take three cognates to fulfill the Areas of Knowledge requirement,
    • one in the Arts & Humanities (A&H),
    • one in People & Society (P&S), and
    • one in Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM).
  • Each cognate has course options that allow students to complete the cognate in ways that meet their individual interests, while staying within the coherent focus of the cognate.
  • In addition to the cognates that have been designed by faculty, each major and minor fulfills the cognate requirement in that one area.
    • Exercise Physiology and Athletic Training majors will fulfill the STEM cognate.
    • Sport Administration, Human and Social Development, and Elementary/ESE majors will fulfill the P&S cognate.
  • An approved list of cognates can be found on the University of Miami website.

VI. Advanced Writing and Communication Skills Requirement

Every student majoring in Human and Social Development, will meet the  Advanced Writing and Communication Requirement upon fulfillment of their major courses. These courses have a prerequisite requirement of  ENG 105 and ENG 106 and will be identified as either writing intensive or as an oral/verbal communication proficiency course or both. Digital competency for both written and oral competencies will be assessed. Writing intensive courses require a minimum of 2500 written words; assignments will be assessed for analytical ability, synthesis of information, grammar, content and style. Courses designated as an oral/verbal proficiency class will provide students an opportunity to demonstrate their presentation skills using accurate standard English structure and syntax, non-verbal cues and gestures, as well as audience appropriate language. Courses in the HSD major which meet the Advanced Writing and Communication Skills Requirement are EPS 321, EPS 371 and EPS 579.

VII. Major in Human and Social Development

  • Every candidate for the B.S.Ed. degree in the Department of Educational and Psychological Studies must choose a major in Human and Social Development.
  • Students choose among three areas of concentration:
    • Track I – Individual and Relational Development (HSDI);
    • Track II – Community and Program Development (HSDC);
    • Track III – Human and Social Development Studies (HSDS). 
      To find the requirements for the major, consult this Bulletin under the discipline concerned, and confer with the designated departmental representative.
  • HSD majors must maintain a minimum overall grade point average of 2.0 with a grade of “C” or better in all courses in the major.
  • HSD students must declare an approved second major or a minor in the School of Education and Human Development or through any other UM school or college.

VIII. Minor

B.S.Ed. majors in Human and Social Development are required to declare a minor.

IX. Electives

Electives may be chosen from any courses offered by the University. The student should consult an advisor before selecting elective courses. At least 6 credit hours must be at the 300 level or above.

X. Senior Assessment

Seniors are required to participate in the General Education Assessment prior to graduation as part of the SACS review process.

For further information, address all inquiries to:

Associate Dean
School of Education and Human Development
P. O. Box 248065
University of Miami
Coral Gables, Florida 33124
Telephone: 305-284-3711

Minor in Educational and Psychological Studies

EPS 201. Psychosocial Change and Well-being. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to personal and interpersonal approaches to well-being. Includes theoretical, historical, philosophical, and psychological bases of well-being. Emphasis will be placed on real-life applications of theory and practice to the promotion of psychosocial change and well-being.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPS 270. Lifespan Human Development. 3 Credit Hours.

Processes and theories of human development from birth to old age are explored. Areas to be covered include: physical development, cognitive development, social and personality development, moral development, and language development. Emphasis is placed on development as a life-long process and its importance in understanding human behavior.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPS 280. Introduction to Family Studies: Dating, Coupling, Parenting. 3 Credit Hours.

Theory and practice of romantic relationships and parent-child relationships, including discussion and skills building. Research based information on how to maximize the quality of these interpersonal relationships will be examined.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPS 291. Community and Character Development. 3 Credit Hours.

The course covers moral and psychological dimensions pertaining to character de velopment as it occurs in communities. Topics include contemporary theory and r esearch regarding perspectives on virtue and morality, states of character, eth ical decision making, and character development. The reciprocal relationships b etween character and community will be a central theme in exploring ethical iss ues that arise in working with individuals, institutions, and communities. Theo ry and research will be linked to relevant applications.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 306. Insanity and Humanity: Mental Illness, Society, Stigma and Services. 3 Credit Hours.

The genesis for this course was the generally poor, inaccurate and stigmatized understanding of mental illness in society based on portrayals in popular media including Hollywood produced films. However, over the past several years the depth and accuracy of awareness and knowledge has changed, as the depiction of mental illness and treatment services in films has improved and the availability of narrative accounts has increased. This course is designed to allow Human and Social Development majors, with a particular interest in wellness and human services, to explore varying portrayals of mental illnesses in popular media. The course will foster critical analysis of narrative and film depictions of illness, as well as connect these depictions to a broader narrative on stigma, social determinants of illness and wellness, prevention and intervention.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

EPS 311. Group Processes and Development. 3 Credit Hours.

Research findings concerning the nature of small groups and patterns of behavior associated with them are explored. Students experience an ongoing group process to which theories and concepts can be applied. Emphasis is placed on learning to be a participant observer of group behavior and processes, learning about one's own behavior in groups, and developing skills to be a more effective member and leader in task groups.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 321. Understanding Human Service Organizations. 3 Credit Hours.

Focus on unique role of community-bases human services organizations in society with an overview and history of community organizations, which provide services, support, advocacy, and organizing in today’s communities. Review of the systems, cultures, structures, and processes of community organizations with a special emphasis on promoting well-being in communities. This course has a 10 hours field research experience requirement. This course is a designated Upper Level Communication Requirement; advanced written, digital and/or oral communication proficiencies will be emphasized in this course.Credit for ENG 105 and ENG 106 (or equivalent), is required for this course.
Prerequisite: EPS 201. Or Corequisite: EPS 311.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 340. Psychology and Sociology of Sexual Identity. 3 Credit Hours.

History, psychology, and sociology of gay, lesbian, and transgendered populations.
Prerequisite: PSY 110 or SOC 101.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPS 351. Introduction to Statistics and Research Design. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will cover basic statistics relevant to the social sciences (e.g., central tendency, variation, t-tests, correlations), with emphasis on real world applications employing commonly used research designs. Students will acquire the tools necessary to interpret elementary statistical analyses and a foundation in the basic analytic methods used in conducting quantitative research in the behavioral sciences.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 360. Educational Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

A review of basic educational psychology principles including cognitive and language development, personal, social and moral development, learning theories, and motivation. A review of basic concepts that contribute to effective learning and other aspects of education.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPS 361. Community Psychology & Development. 3 Credit Hours.

Community psychology is about the prevention of psychosocial problems and the promotion of mental health and well being through the creation of equitable and just social settings, neighborhoods, communities, and societies. Course topics include: stress & social support; oppression and human diversity; primary prevention, social intervention and health promotion; self-help; mediating structures; community mental health; alternative settings; community development and social change.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 365. Psychological Study of Children, Families, and the Law. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce students to the psychological research and practice thathas a bearing on legal policy and practice. Psychological research (social, clinical,developmental, and community) will be emphasized along with legal rulings,especially from the Supreme Court. Throughout the course, the underlyingquestion will be, "How can psychological research and theory inform the law inmatters that relate to children, families, and communities?"
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 371. Applied Social Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

The study of the ethics, philosophies, designs, methods and techniques of research in the behavioral and social sciences. This course provides a brief orientation to quantitative, qualitative, mixed-methods, and participatory research designs and approaches used in the collection, analysis and interpretation of social research data.This course is a designated Upper Level Communication Requirement; advanced written, digital and/or oral communication proficiencies will be emphasized in this course.Credit for ENG 105 and ENG 106 (or equivalent), is required for this course.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 411. The Psychology of Diversity. 3 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 412. Migration, Well Being, and Human Development. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the social and psychological processes involved inmigration and issues relevant to well-being of diverse immigrant groupsincluding immigration policies, the psychology of immigration andacculturation, ethnic identities, issues in immigrant families, immigrantcommunities, educational, health, and mental health issues.
Prerequisite: EPS 201.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 420. Introduction to Counseling and Psychotherapy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a survey of the theories and practical applications of counseling and psychotherapy. Students will acquire an understanding of a variety of theories of psychotherapy, the basic requirements and skills for effective, ethical counseling, and an appreciation for the role of values and human differences in counseling and psychotherapy. This course does not prepare students for practice in mental health professions.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 440. Listening and Helping Skills.. 3 Credit Hours.

Listening and Helping Skills is an introductory course to the foundational skills used in helping relationships. Through lectures, discussions and role- plays, students will learn the rationale behind basic helping skills and their application to diverse settings and contexts.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 452. Community Program Development And Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses the theoretical and practical principles of designing, planning, implementing, and evaluating programs in community-bases settings. The students will learn about prevention, effective program development, program approaches, program components, program evaluation, and cultural proficiency in program development and evaluation. Students will acquire and practice skills for becoming effective workers and leaders in community-based agencies. The course will consist of readings, presentations, and applied knowledge.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 462. Community Consultation and Leadership. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will cover strength based, preventive, empowering approaches to institutional and community change, and will address related skills, stages, processes and outcomes; Conflict resolution, facilitation, strategic planning, visioning, advocacy, change management, and community mobilization will be studied and practiced in class.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 504. Mentored Research Studies. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Under the guidance of EPS faculty and graduate students, undergraduate students , will have an opportunity to get involved in various components of research study; gain valuable knowledge and research experience; and expand their undergraduate academic experience.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPS 505. Lifespan Human Development. 3 Credit Hours.

Theories and research relating to the biophysical, cognitive, and psychosocial domains of human lifespan development.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 510. Professional, Legal and Ethical Issues in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours.

Professional, legal, ethical, and licensing issues in the counseling profession .
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

EPS 511. Lifestyle and Career Counseling. 3 Credit Hours.

An introductory course in career development and career counseling, focusing on theories of career development, counseling tools, strategies, and sociological, economic, and psychological influences on the American worker.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 512. Assessment Strategies for Counselors I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course places emphasis on diagnosis, appraisal, assessment, and testing for individual and interpersonal disorders. It addresses statistical procedures and psychometric principles necessary for responsible test use and exposes the student to a variety of test and non-test assessment techniques in marriage and family, and mental health counseling.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 513. Counseling Process and Practice. 3 Credit Hours.

The development of basic communication and clinical skills necessary for establishing the counseling relationship and conducting therapy.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 514. Psychosocial Bases of Social and Cultural Diversity. 3 Credit Hours.

Interrelationship between psychology and sociology in understanding development of diversity in human social systems. Implications for counseling and therapy.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 517. Working With Black Clients:Treatment And Assessment Considerations. 3 Credit Hours.

This course presents three core content areas with respect to the treatment and assessment of Black populations. The first content area addresses historical aspects of the development of Black psychology. Additionally, it will review ethnocentrism, the misuse of Western psychology to marginalize African Americans and reasons for scientific abuses against people of color, such as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. Lastly the first content area will focus on topics such as the Black family, racism, cultural mistrust, stereotype threat, Black/White relations, and Black mental health. Concomitant aspects of Black culture including; racial identity development, spirituality, sexuality, common misconceptions about Black populations, and within group differences related to gender, class, age, and sexual orientation will be peripherally addressed. The second content area presents a culturally-informed perspective on the psychological assessment and treatment of African Americans. It will focus on topics such as ethnic/racial identity models, cultural variables that may affect DSM 5 diagnoses, epidemiological mental health data across ethno-racial groups, biased measures, culturally specific interventions, and important factors to consider during the delivery of treatment. The third module will focus largely on the infusion and integration of the first two modules in therapeutic practice with Black populations.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 526. Counseling in Community Settings. 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of a variety of perspectives on community services relevant to mental health counselors. Topics include: the variety of community settings; community, national, and international diversity in mental health services; diversity of clients (e.g., cultures, religions, GLBT, elderly, social classes, disabilities); mental health funding; the role of politics, policy, advocacy, and research; interviewing across cultures.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 527. Community Youth Development. 3 Credit Hours.

This course in community youth development (CYD) will focus on the philosophical, sociological, and educational foundations of a youth development perspective that highlights youth as powerful catalysts for change and positive forces in shaping communities. We reflect on how youth development is inextricably linked with family and community development. After reviewing and critiquing traditional adolescent development theories, students will engage with theories and practices of CYD, youth empowerment, youth civic engagement, youth organizing, social justice youth development, youth activism, and critical youth engagement.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

EPS 533. Organization and Administration of Higher Education I. 3 Credit Hours.

Theoretical approaches from organizational analysis. Applications to problems, processes, and patterns of higher education institutions. Consideration given to legal status, governance patterns, and external relations. Administrator, faculty, trustee, and student roles are also explored.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 539. Effective Teaching, Learning, Assessment & Curriculum in Higher Education. 3 Credit Hours.

Provides an overview of current theories, research, and best practices in effective teaching, learning, assessment, and curricular design.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Summer.

EPS 543. The Community College. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of American community colleges including historical evolution, purposes and functions, characteristics of students and faculty, organization and administration, curricula, current issues, and trends.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

EPS 545. Administration of Student Affairs. 3 Credit Hours.

History and philosophy of student affairs will be addressed as well as principles and organization of student affairs administration, current problems, procedures, and recent developments.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

EPS 553. Introductory Statistics. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic Statistical procedures will be discussed including measures of central tendency, variability and relationship, sampling, and basic tests of statistical significance.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Summer.

EPS 554. Essentials of Research in Social and Behavioral Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the standards methods and techniques of research in the behavioral and social sciences. Brief orientation to quantitative and qualitative procedures used in the analysis and interpretation of research data are emphasized.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPS 568. Computer Applications in Educational and Behavioral Science Research. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the use of microcomputer statistical packages in social science research, with emphasis given to SPSS for Windows. Course content will cover a broad range of activities encountered in the data analytic process including planning and creating a database, data coding, file manipulation tasks, data screening, and statistical analysis.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

EPS 570. Basic skills in Counseling and Interviewing. 3 Credit Hours.

Introductory course on essential skills used in counseling and interviewing. Through lectures, discussions, and small group exercises, students will explore their natural style of helping and learn effective listening and communication skills. This course is not intended to train students to become a professional counselor.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 578. Human and Social Development Practicum. 3-6 Credit Hours.

The practicum serves an integrative function: it allows students to apply their academic training, to further develop their career goals, and to hone their skills while gaining experience in real-world settings. Practica are unpaid, supervised experiences. Students choose from a menu of settings that have been approved as HSD practicum sites and spend a minimum of 120 hours (3 credits) or 250 hours (6 credits) at their chose setting over the course of the semester. Must be taken concurrently with EPS 481.
Components: PRA.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 579. Human and Social Development Practicum Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

The Practicum Seminar brings theory and research to bear on the student’s practicum experiences, and provides a forum for further professional skill development and growth. Students will complete a major project integrating their experiences.This course is a designated Upper Level Communication Requirement; advanced written, digital and/or oral communication proficiencies will be emphasized in this course.Credit for ENG 105 and ENG 106 (or equivalent), is required for this course.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 587. Special Topics In Human And Social Development. 1-3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed for students wishing to focus on a specific area of study within the umbrella of Human and Social Development. Topics will be offered based on current trends in the field as well as student and faculty interest. Students will be given supervision and support in a structured seminar setting.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPS 589. Individual Study. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Individual work on a special project under faculty guidance.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPS 591. Workshop in Education. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Study in special interest areas in education.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

EPS 592. Workshop in Education. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Study in special interest areas in education.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

EPS 593. Workshop in Education. 3 Credit Hours.

Study in special interest areas in education.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPS 595. Research Honors Project I. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is restricted to students in the SEHD who have been accepted into the Research Honors Program and are working with a Faculty mentor.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPS 596. Research Honors Project II. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is restricted to students in the SEHD who have been accepted into the Research Honors Program and are working with a Faculty mentor.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

EPS 598. Research Honors Project - Seminar. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is restricted to students in the SEHD who have been accepted into the Research Honors Program and are working with a Faculty mentor. Students are required to present at the undergraduate Research, Creativity, and Innovation Forum.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

EPS 599. Individual Study. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Individual work on a special project under faculty guidance.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.