http://www.miami.edu/sonhs

Nursing Accreditation

The baccalaureate nursing program in the University of Miami's (UM's) School of Nursing and Health Studies (SONHS) is approved by the Florida Board of Nursing and accredited by the following:

Commission of Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)
One DuPont Circle NW, Suite 530
Washington, DC  20036
(202) 887-6791 

Academic Programs

Baccalaureate education is the primary foundation for professional nursing and is necessary for graduate study.  The SONHS offers three baccalaureate options leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree:

  1. Accelerated BSN: For students who hold a baccalaureate degree in a field other than nursing and who seek a one year nursing degree
  2. RN-to-BSN: For students who possess a diploma or Associate’s degree in nursing, who have successfully completed the Registered Nurse (RN) licensure exam, and who wish to finish their baccalaureate education within three to five semesters
  3. Traditional BSN: For students who may not have any previous higher education experience and who seek a traditional four-year nursing degree

Admission

Students who possess a baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution in a field other than nursing and who wish to pursue a career in nursing may apply to the Accelerated BSN program.  Applicants must meet specific admission criteria and complete specific clinical prerequisites before they may enter the Accelerated BSN program.  Applications for the Accelerated BSN program are submitted through NursingCAS and are reviewed by the SONHS.

The RN-to-BSN program is designed to provide licensed RNs who have an Associate’s degree or a nursing diploma with an opportunity to complete the remaining coursework needed to earn a BSN degree.  Students interested in the RN-to-BSN program must meet specific admission criteria and must apply through the Office of Undergraduate Admission.  All applications are reviewed by the SONHS.

Admission as a new freshman to the Traditional BSN program is handled through the Office of Undergraduate Admission and is open to applicants who meet the general requirements for admission to the UM.  Students who wish to transfer into the Traditional BSN program must also meet general UM admission requirements.  Additionally, students who wish to transfer directly into the clinical components of the Traditional BSN curriculum (i.e., the third year) must complete specific clinical prerequisites as outlined by the SONHS.  These transfer applicants will be considered for direct entry into clinical coursework as space allows.  All transfer applications are handled through the Office of Undergraduate Admission and are reviewed by the SONHS.  Only credits taken at regionally-accredited institutions are considered for transfer to the UM.

Applicants interested in any of the SONHS' baccalaureate programs are encouraged to speak with a representative from the SONHS’ Office of Student Services (OSS) and/or the UM’s Office of Undergraduate Admission.

Academic Policies

Technical Standards

Nursing education requires that the accumulation of scientific knowledge be accompanied by the simultaneous acquisition of skills and professional attitudes and behaviors. The nursing degrees awarded by the UM SONHS at the completion of the educational process certifies that the individual has acquired a base of knowledge and skills required for the practice of nursing at the respective undergraduate or graduate level. To this end, all courses in the curriculum must be completed successfully. In order to acquire the knowledge and skills to function in a variety of clinical situations and to render a wide spectrum of patient care, candidates for the undergraduate and graduate degrees in nursing must have abilities and skills in five areas:

  1. Observation
  2. Communication
  3. Motor
  4. Conceptual-Integrative
  5. Behavioral-Social

Technological compensation can be made for some disabilities in certain of these areas, but a candidate should be able to perform in a reasonably independent manner and exercise independent judgment.  Reasonable accommodations will be considered on a case by case basis for individuals who meet eligibility under applicable statutes. Any person expecting to need accommodations should request them prior to beginning the program, as some accommodations may not be considered reasonable and may impact an applicant’s ability to complete all components of the program.

Observation

The candidate must be able to observe demonstrations and participate in didactic courses and simulated learning opportunities. A candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand. Observation requires the use of common sense, as well as the functional use of the senses of vision, audition, olfaction, and palpation.

Communication

Candidates must communicate effectively using English in clinical and classroom settings. A candidate must be able to elicit information from patients, describe changes in mood, activity and posture, and perceive nonverbal communications. A candidate must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Communication includes not only speech, but reading and writing. The candidate must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently with all members of the health care team in both immediate and recorded modes.

Motor

Candidates should have sufficient motor function to elicit information from patients by palpation, auscultation, percussion and other assessment techniques. A candidate should be able to perform nursing skills requiring the use of gross and fine motor skills (e.g. IV insertion, venous blood draw, urinary catheter insertion). A candidate should be able to execute motor movements reasonably required to provide nursing care and emergency response to patients. Examples of emergency responses reasonably required of nurses are cardiopulmonary resuscitation, medication administration, and application of pressure to stop bleeding. Candidates must perform actions which require the use of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, and functional use of the senses of touch and vision. Candidates should also be able to assist and/or participate in various lifting activities.

Conceptual-Integrative

These abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis, synthesis, and retention of complex information. Critical thinking requires all of these intellectual abilities in order to provide optimal nursing care. In addition, the candidate should be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand the spatial relationships of structures.

Behavioral-Social

Candidates must possess the emotional health required for the full use of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients. Candidates must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress in the classroom and clinical area. They must be able to adapt to changing environments, display flexibility and learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical environment. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest and motivation are all personal qualities that are assessed during the admissions and educational process.

Clinical Clearance

Before students can enter the clinical components of the undergraduate nursing curriculum, they must successfully complete a drug test and a background check.  Students must have a background report without any infractions, regardless of how they were resolved or adjudicated. Accordingly, if a student’s background report contains any infractions, regardless of how they were resolved or adjudicated, he/she may not be able to successfully complete the background check and he/she will be withdrawn from the nursing program.

Students must also provide current immunizations as outlined by the SONHS and obtain a Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers certification from the American Heart Association prior to entry into clinical coursework.  The BLS certification must include content on Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs).

Refer to the Student Handbook or speak with a representative in the OSS for more information.

Grades

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for more detailed information on the SONHS' policies related to grades, progression, and dismissal.

Undergraduate nursing students must earn a C or higher in each clinical prerequisite and each nursing course to progress.

A C- or below is considered a failure in a clinical prerequisite or a nursing course.  Students are allowed to repeat only one failed clinical prerequisite and one failed nursing course.  A student who fails only one clinical prerequisite and/or one nursing course, retakes the failed clinical prerequisite and/or failed nursing course, and receives a passing grade on the second attempt at a failed clinical prerequisite and/or a failed nursing course may progress through the program but the original failure is still counted as a failed course.  Failure of two clinical prerequisites or two nursing courses with a grade of C- or below, or failure of the same clinical prerequisite or the same nursing course twice with a grade of C- or below, constitutes failure of two clinical prerequisites or two nursing courses, respectively, and the student will be dismissed from the nursing program.

When a nursing course must be repeated, progression in the nursing program will be altered in order for prerequisites to be met.  Such alteration will lengthen the time required to complete the BSN program.

Students who repeat a clinical nursing course must repeat both the theoretical and clinical components of the course.  Students are required to fulfill the course requirements in effect at the time of enrollment.  No special courses will be created for students who repeat a course.

Grade Point Averages (GPAs)

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for more detailed information on the SONHS' policies related to GPAs, progression, and dismissal.

Requirements to Declare

Current UM students who wish to switch into the Traditional BSN program must posses a minimum 3.0 UM GPA and a minimum 2.75 clinical prerequisite GPA to be considered.

Incoming transfer students who plan to enter the Traditional BSN degree must possess a minimum 3.5 transfer GPA and a minimum 3.3 clinical prerequisite GPA to be considered for admission.

Requirements to Continue

Students who are enrolled in the Traditional BSN program and who are not yet enrolled in their clinical coursework (i.e., third or fourth year) are strongly encouraged not to continue with the nursing major if they have less than a 2.5 UM GPA and/or less than a 2.5 clinical prerequisite GPA after 15 credits in the clinical prerequisites and/or second year nursing courses.

Requirements to Progress into Clinical Coursework

Students who enter the Accelerated BSN program enter directly into clinical coursework.  These students must posses a minimum 3.0 transfer GPA and a minimum 3.0 clinical prerequisite GPA to be considered for admission.

Current UM students enrolled in the Traditional BSN program must possess a minimum 3.0 UM GPA and a minimum 2.75 clinical prerequisite GPA to progress into their clinical coursework (i.e., third year).

Incoming transfer students who apply to transfer directly into the clinical components of the Traditional BSN degree (i.e., the third year) must possess a minimum 3.5 transfer GPA and a minimum 3.3 clinical prerequisite GPA to be considered for admission.

Requirements to Graduate

Students enrolled in the Accelerated BSN, RN-to-BSN, and Traditional BSN programs must complete their coursework with a minimum 2.0 UM GPA and a minimum 2.0 major GPA to graduate.

Prerequisuites and Corequisites

Students must successfully complete all specified prerequisites with a C or higher before entering a nursing course or with a C- or higher before entering a health science or public health course.  Students must also register for all required corequisites at the time of enrollment.  If students enroll in a health science, nursing, or public health course without the proper prerequisite or corequisite, they may be dropped from the course at the discretion of the course instructor, OSS, Associate Dean, or Dean.  Students should consult an academic advisor in the OSS to discuss any questions related to course enrollment.

Residency Requirements

Undergraduate nursing students must adhere to the general UM residency rules.  Once a student enrolls at the UM, all remaining clinical prerequisites must be completed at the UM unless special permission is obtained through an appeal to the Undergraduate Academic Standing and Admissions Committee (UGASAC).  Additionally, all courses in the nursing major must be completed at the UM.  Students should speak with an academic advisor in the OSS for more information on the residency requirements and on the UGASAC appeals process.

Transfer Credit

Students may transfer health science, nursing, or public health courses from other institutions to the UM with approval by the OSS.  Detailed course descriptions or syllabi must be be presented to the OSS for transfer equivalency reviews.

Degree Requirements

Listed in this section are the degree requirements for the Traditional BSN program.  The Accelerated BSN and RN-to-BSN requirements are listed under the "OVERVIEW" section of the "TRACKS IN BSN PROGRAMS" link for each of the respective programs.

The University of Miami's General Education Requirements (GERs) consist of the Areas of Proficiency, Areas of Knowledge, and Advanced Writing and Communication Skills requirements.  Through the completion of the GERs, graduates acquire essential intellectual skills and engage a range of academic disciplines.  The GERs provide students with the opportunity to study methodologies and achievements in all areas of human inquiry and creative endeavor, and to cultivate abilities essential for the acquisition of knowledge.  The GERs also allow students to create an integrative map for their academic careers, providing a context for more focused studies. 

All Areas of Proficiency, Areas of Knowledge, clinical prerequisites, and electives, except for the nursing major elective, must be completed prior to the clinical components of the Traditional BSN program (i.e., the third year).  Students should meet with an academic advisor in the OSS to discuss any questions related to degree, clinical prerequisite, or major requirements.

Areas of Proficiency

The Areas of Proficiency requirements ensure students either possess or develop the ability to express themselves effectively, to use mathematics with facility, and to reason cogently.

English Composition

Good writing facilitates clear thinking, and clear thinking is the foundation of effective communication.  The expectation is that students become adept at using the English language as an effective communication tool.  Effective writing skills are representative of an educated person because they are instruments to advance ideas efficiently and persuasively.  

Requirements

Students complete this requirement by completing ENG 105 and ENG 106 (Note: SAT or ACT verbal scores can be used to waive the ENG 105 requirement; credit will not be awarded for the waiver.  Students who enter UM with credits for ENG 105 or ENG 106 may take ENG 208 to finish this requirement).

Outcomes

By completing the English Composition requirement, students will be able to:

  1. gather information, synthesize data, compare various points of view, and present results in writing
  2. develop the ability to read texts critically and to use textual evidence to support a sophisticated written argument
  3. consider audience, tone, organization, and standard conventions in relationship to specific rhetorical tasks
Mathematics

In a world increasingly influenced by science and technology, it is important for students to acquire the capacity to use and understand essential mathematical applications.  The mathematics requirement helps students learn to use quantitative methods to solve problems by emphasizing the manipulation, interpretation, and application of quantitative data.

Requirements

Students complete this requirement by completing NUR 202.

Math placement criteria is established affected by the Department of Mathematics.  The following items may affect students’ math placement at the UM: SAT and ACT scores, ALEKS math placement scores, and AP, IB, dual enrollment, and transfer credits.  Students should review the information listed on the Department of Mathematics website and consult with an academic advisor in the OSS if they have any questions.

Outcomes

By completing the Mathematics requirement, students will be able to:

  1. select quantitative tools appropriate for solving problems
  2. use quantitative tools appropriate for solving problems
  3. interpret quantitative data in an appropriate manner for solving problems

Areas of Knowledge (Cognates)

The Areas of Knowledge requirement is designed to help students understand and appreciate intellectual achievements in major areas of human inquiry and creative endeavor.  The courses offered in the Areas of Knowledge provide a broad array of intellectual and cultural exploration.  In satisfying these requirements, students examine creative expression in the arts, literature, and philosophy; study human development and behavior; and explore the mathematical, scientific, and technological world.

Students fulfill the Areas of Knowledge requirement by completing a specific "cognate" in three distinct areas: Arts & Humanities, People & Society, and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM).  Cognates are groups of "at least three related courses for at least 9 credits" focused on a specific topic.  Majors and minors can be used to fulfill a cognate in its respective Area of Knowledge.  Each cognate used to fulfill one of the Areas of Knowledge must have a different Responsible Academic Unit (RAU).  Several cognates may include the same courses; however, one course cannot be used to complete multiple cognates.  For more information on cognates, go to the "General Education Requirements" section of the Academic Bulletin or visit http://www.miami.edu/cognates/.

Arts & Humanities

Arts & Humanities cognates engage students in the study of the most enduring and influential works of art, imagination, and culture.  Through study, creation, and performance, courses in this area enable students to understand the works of artists, musicians, novelists, philosophers, playwrights, poets, historians, and theologians.  These courses cultivate the ability to interpret, critically evaluate, and experience the creative products of human culture and expression.

Requirements

Complete one Arts & Humanities cognate. 

Outcomes

By completing the Arts & Humanities requirement, students will be able to:

  1. critically evaluate and interpret the creative products of humanistic and artistic expression, applying appropriate vocabulary and concepts for their description and analysis
  2. understand the creation and performance of art
People & Society

People & Society cognates help students understand and analyze the organization of society and the patterns of social change, in the past and in the contemporary world.

Requirements

Complete one People & Society cognate.

Outcomes

By completing the People & Society requirement, students will be able to:

  1. analyze the organization of society
  2. analyze patterns of social change
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

STEM cognates develop students’ abilities to think critically about mathematical, scientific, and technological issues by understanding the processes and methods of scientific inquiry involved in experimentation, observation, and quantitative analysis.  The STEM cognates nurture literacies that enable students to make informed decisions in an increasingly complex world.

Requirements

Complete one STEM cognate.  The nursing major may be used to fulfill this cognate area.

Outcomes

By completing the STEM requirement, students will be able to:

  1. understand the use of quantitative tools, experimentation, and observation to analyze and solve mathematical, scientific, environmental, and technological problems
  2. interpret quantitative data and draw useful conclusions

Clinical Prerequisites

Refer to the "Clinical Prerequisite Requirements" section below for information on the clinical prerequisites required for the Traditional BSN program.

Major

Refer to the "Major Requirements" section below for information on the courses required for the Traditional BSN nursing major.

Advanced Writing and Communication Skills

The Advanced Writing and Communication Skills requirement empowers nursing students to develop their communication skills, both written and verbal, enabling them to better articulate information relating to health science, nursing, and public health.  Several designated writing-intensive courses are built into the nursing major to satisfy this requirement.

Required Communication domains

Students must communicate effectively using English in clinical and classroom settings.  A student must be able to elicit information from patients, describe changes in mood, activity, and posture, and perceive nonverbal communications.  A student must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients.  Communication includes not only speech, but reading and writing.  Students must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently with all members of the healthcare team in both immediate and recorded modes. Throughout the curriculum students are expected to achieve skills in the following communication domains:

Therapeutic Communication

Therapeutic communication between the nurse and patient is a cornerstone of effective nursing care.  This communication style is goal-oriented and focused on learning and promoting growth.

Example content: principles of therapeutic use of self; therapeutic communication techniques; health education/teaching; reflective journals

Technical Communication

Technical communication encompasses the specific methods used by the nursing profession to communicate information necessary for nursing practice.

Example content: use of clinical information systems (e.g., electronic health record, physician order entry); application of standardized health care terminology; use of data and data systems

Inter- and Intra-Professional Communication

Effective communication among all members of the healthcare team is essential for delivering high quality, safe patient care.

Example content: teamwork/cooperative learning; scopes of practice; conflict resolution; group dynamics and evaluation

Scholarly Written Communication

Scholarly writing is a formal means of communication in which the writer communicates synthesized knowledge about a topic while also demonstrating original thought and unique perspectives.

Example content: scholarly papers; research critiques; application of APA publication style

Scholarly Verbal Communication

Scholarly verbal communication is a formal way of speaking with the intended audience to provide and/or elicit information in a systematic manner.  Primary methods of scholarly verbal communication involve verbal presentations/lectures and formal data gathering processes such as interviews.

Example content: scholarly presentations; key informant interviews

Minimal writing proficiency standards

Writing proficiency is evaluated throughout the BSN plan of study.  Three primary categories of writing are required:

  1. scholarly papers (NUR 400/NUR 401, NUR 440, and NUR 453)
  2. patient care documentation (NUR 304, NUR 308, NUR 318, NUR 320, NUR 411, NUR 448, and NUR 453)
  3. reflective journals (NUR 306 and NUR 453)

Each writing component is evaluated as part of the grading rubric for the associated course.  Feedback and revisions are required.

Plan for assessment

Content to meet the required communication domains and minimal writing proficiency standards is provided across the curriculum.  The table below outlines the specific communication domains covered in each course as well as the assessment/outcome criteria used to measure them.  In addition to demonstrating skills across the five required communication domains, students must complete ENG 105 and ENG 106 or their equivalents to provide the foundation for the development of more advanced writing and communication skills.

Course Commication Domain Assessment/Outcome (exemplars)
ENG 105 and ENG 106 or their equivalents Serves as a prerequisuite to other skills Serves as a prerequisuite to other skills
HCS 212 and HCS 213 Technical Communication Examinations
HSC 215 and HSC 216 Technical Communication Examinations
NUR 306 Technical Communication Dietary journals
Therapeutic Communication Dietary Analysis System
Reflective Paper
NUR 202 Technical Communication Examinations
NUR 300 Inter/Intra Professional Communication Simulation/Scholarly Papers
NUR 317 Therapeutic Communication Reflective Journals
Scholarly Verbal Communication Scholarly Presentation
NUR 304 Technical Communication Examinations
Therapeutic Communication Patient Care Documentation
Inter- and Intra- Professional Clinical Evaluations
Communication Simulation
NUR 307 Technical Communication Examinations
NUR 311 Therapeutic Communication Scholarly Papers
Inter- and Intra- Professional Scholarly Presentation
Communication Wiki Postings
Scholarly Written Communication
Scholarly Verbal Communication
NUR 314 Technical Communication Examinations
Therapeutic Communication Simulation
NUR 315 Technical Communication Examinations
NUR 308 Technical Communication Examinations
Therapeutic Communication Patient Care Documentation
Inter- and Intra- Professional Clinical Evaluations
Communication Simulation
NUR 318 Technical Communication Examinations
Therapeutic Communication Patient Care Documentation
Inter- and Intra-Professional Communication Clinical Evaluations
Health Teaching Project Simulation
NUR 320 Technical Communication Examinations
Therapeutic Communication Patient Care Documentation
Inter- and Intra-Professional Communication Clinical Evaluations
Health Teaching Project Simulation
NUR 411 Technical Communication Examinations
Therapeutic Communication Patient Care Documentation
Inter- and Intra-Professional Communication Clinical Evaluations
Scholarly Verbal Communication Scholarly Presentation Simulation
NUR 440 Therapeutic Communication Examinations
Technical Communication Clinical Evaluations
Inter- and Intra-Professional Communication Health Teaching Project
Scholarly Written Communication Key Informant Interviews
Scholarly Verbal Communication Surveillance Data
Scholarly Paper
Scholarly Presentation Simulation
NUR 441 Therapeutic Communication Examinations
Technical Communication Clinical Evaluations
Inter/Intra-Professisonal Communication Health Teaching Project
Scholarly Written Communication Key Informant Interviews
Scholarly Verbal Communication Surveillance Data
NUR 448 Therapeutic Communication Examinations
Technical Communication Patient Care Documentation
Inter- and Intra-Professional Communication Clinical Evaluations
NUR 400 and NUR 401 Scholarly Written Communication Scholarly Paper
Scholarly Verbal Communication Scholarly Presentation
NUR 430 Therapeutic Communication Examinations
Intern- and Intra-Professional Communication
NUR 453 Therapeutic Communication Examinations
Technical Communication Patient Care Documentation
Inter- and Intra-Professional Communication Clinical Evaluations
Scholarly Written Communication Reflective Journals
Scholarly Paper Simulation
Elective (BIL, BPH, HCS, HST, or NUR course at the 200 level or above) Varies Varies

Electives

Students must earn a minimum of 120 credits to complete the Traditional BSN degree.  Students may need to take varying numbers of elective credits beyond the degree requirements listed above to reach the 120 credit threshold.

Clinical Prerequisite Requirements

Accelerated BSN

All clinical prerequisites must be completed prior to matriculation into the Accelerated BSN program and within the last 10 years.  The clinical prerequisites include:

CHM 103
CHM 105
Chemistry for Life Sciences I (Lecture)
and Chemistry for Life Sciences I (Laboratory)
4
HCS 212
HCS 213
Human Anatomy
and Human Anatomy Laboratory
4
HCS 215Principles of Systemic Physiology3
MIC 320Introduction to Microbes and the Immune System for Nurses3
NUR 202Introductory Statistics in Health Care3
NUR 306Principles of Nutrition3
NUR 317Theories in Growth and Development3
PSY 110Introduction to Psychology3

RN-to-BSN

Students must meet specific admission criteria to be considered for the RN-to-BSN program.  If admitted, any required coursework must be completed prior to matriculation.

Traditional BSN

All clinical prerequisites must be completed prior to the clinical components of the Traditional BSN program (i.e., the third year) and within the last 10 years.  The clinical requirements include:

BIL 150
BIL 151
General Biology
and General Biology Laboratory
5
CHM**4-5
HCS 212
HCS 213
Human Anatomy
and Human Anatomy Laboratory
4
HCS 215Principles of Systemic Physiology3
MIC 320Introduction to Microbes and the Immune System for Nurses3
MTH**3
NUR 202Introductory Statistics in Health Care3
NUR 306Principles of Nutrition3
NUR 317Theories in Growth and Development3
PSY 110Introduction to Psychology3

(*) = Chemistry is satisfied by CHM 103/CHM 105, CHM 111/CHM 113, or CHM 121/CHM 113.

(**) = MTH 101, MTH 107, or mathematics placement higher than MTH 107.  Note: MTH 107 is a pre- or co-requisite for BIL 150.

Students can transfer equivalent clinical prerequisites to the UM as long as they comply with the general UM and the SONHS residency rules (see "Residency Requirements" section above).  Students must provide the documentation listed in the "Transfer Credit" section above to the OSS for any health science, nursing, or public health transfer equivalency requests.  For transfer equivalency reviews of any other clinical prerequisites, students must present any necessary documentation to the respective academic unit for their consideration.

Major Requirements

Nursing must be a student's first major.  There is no additional major offered in nursing.

Visit the "TRACKS IN BSN PROGRAMS" link to learn more about the major requirements for the SONHS' BSN programs, which are listed under the "OVERVIEW" section for each BSN program.

Minor Requirements

BSN students are not required to complete a minor.

There is no minor available in nursing.

Classes Not Applicable Toward SONHS Degrees

The following courses do not count toward the 120 credits required of the BSN degree: DAN 101-104, ENG 103, and MTH 099.  Based on their ENG or MTH placement scores, students may need to complete ENG 103 or MTH 099 before enrolling in higher-level requirements.  Even though the courses listed above cannot count toward graduation, they can count toward the 12 credits required to be considered a full-time student.

Pre-immersion Course

Prior to enrollment in clinical nursing courses, students must complete a mandatory online pre-immersion course.  The pre-immersion course is listed in students' first term of clinical enrollment but it does not affect students' GPAs.  Failure to complete the pre-immersion course may delay entry into the clinical nursing courses.  Information about the pre-immersion course will be provided to eligible students by the OSS. 

Senior Assessments

In line with the SONHS’ ongoing accreditation efforts, seniors with a major in the health science, nursing, and public health may be required to participate in general or major-specific senior assessments lasting up to several hours each.  Scores on senior assessments will not affect students’ GPAs or ability to graduate, but failure to complete required assessments may delay or prevent students’ ability to graduate.

HESI Exams

Mandatory HESI exams are required throughout the undergraduate nursing programs.  For further details, refer to the Student Handbook.

RN Licensure Exam (NCLEX-RN)

Students who successfully complete the Accelerated BSN or Traditional BSN program at the SONHS are eligible to sit for the RN licensure exam referred to as the NCLEX-RN.  For additional eligibility requirements, refer to the appropriate state board of nursing website.

Research Experience

Students may participate in research experiences through the SONHS or the Office of Undergraduate Research and Community Outreach during their time at the UM.  Students should speak with the academic advisors located in the OSS to learn more about the research opportunities available to them at the UM.

Required Coursework and Sample Plans of Study

Visit the "TRACKS IN BSN PROGRAMS" link to learn more about the academic requirements for the SONHS' BSN programs and to view sample graduation plans, which are listed under the "OVERVIEW" and "PLAN OF STUDY" sections, respectively, for each BSN program.

NUR 100. Introduction to Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an introductory course to explore the various roles and responsibilities of the professional nurse in American health care. Major issues within health care today will be discussed and the impact they have on professional nursing will be explored.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 200. Process of Health Promotion. 3 Credit Hours.

Healthcare: A process of health promotion, maintenance, rehabilitation, and preventative medicine.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

NUR 202. Introductory Statistics in Health Care. 3 Credit Hours.

Application of descriptive and inferential statistics. Principles and methods of summarizing data including tables, graphs, percentile ranks, central tendency, variability, normal distribution. Basic concepts of probability, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variance. Examples and problems from nursing and health sciences.
Corequisite: MTH 101. Or Requisite: ALEKS > or = 55 or SAT Score > or = 630 or ACT > or = 28.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

NUR 205. Personal Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours.

Principles of nutrition integrated with cultural dietary patterns across the lifespan. Not for nursing majors or minors.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 207. Introduction to Pharmacology. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the basic principles of therapeutic pharmacology. Special consideration of cultural beliefs and folk medicine included. Emphasis is on the understanding of the different classes of drugs and their application in various health care settings.
Prerequisites: BIL 150 and CHM 103 or 111 or 121 and HCS 212/215.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 300. Seminar in Inter-Professional Health Care. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will introduce the core competencies of inter professional collaborative practice using guidelines from the Institute of Medicine, Quality and Safety Education for Nurses and the Inter professional Education Consortium. Concepts of team based care will be discussed. The course will offer online activities as well as face-to-face team based activities with other healthcare professionals.
Requisite: Nursing Major and Sophomore Standing or Higher.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Summer.

NUR 301. Human Sexuality and Vulnerable Populations. 3 Credit Hours.

The study of human sexuality via multidisciplinary theoretical perspectives and research. Students will examine the complext relationships of the physiological, psychological, cultural, gender, religious, historical, and political aspects of human sexuality. Human sexuality in the context of health disparities will form the foundation for the course. WRITING COURSE
Prerequisite: BPH 206 or Requisite: Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 303. HIV/AIDS And Health Maintenance For Health Care Providers. 3 Credit Hours.

Definition, diagnosis, management, and care of diverse patient populations with HIV infection and AIDS. Course is presented and discussed from an interdisciplinary health care perspective.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 304. Adult Health I: Fundamentals of Nursing Practice. 6 Credit Hours.

This clinical course emphasizes the supervised application of health assessment skills, nursing process, and clinical nursing techniques in the clinical laboratory, community, and acute care settings.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

NUR 305. Issues in Health Disparities. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will be an introduction to the general research on health systems and health disparities. Emphasis will be placed on social, biological, economic and social policy issues that impact on the health of minority populations. Concepts associated with epidemiology, poverty, racism, public policy and international politics will be explored. WRITING COURSE
Prerequisite: BPH 206 or Requisite: Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

NUR 306. Principles of Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours.

Principles of nutrition integrated with cultural dietary patterns for client adaptation across the lifespan.
Requisite: Sophomore Status or Permission of Instructor.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

NUR 307. Pharmacology. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the basic principles of therapeutic pharmacology. Special consideration of cultural beliefs and folk medicine included.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

NUR 308. Adult Health II. 7 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the nursing management of the client throughout the adult life cycle who experiences alterations and/or adaptations in physiologic defense mechanisms. Teaching strategies to be utilized include lecture, discussion, critical thinking exercises.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

NUR 310. Global Health. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the concepts of global health and the critical links between public health and social and economic development. Determinants of health and patterns of disease and health outcomes across the globe are critically examined. The course reviews the determinants of health status in terms of biology, demography, epidemiology, culture, sociology, economics, and politics. Key concerns regarding reproductive health, child survival, nutrition, communicable diseases, and chronic diseases are examined. health care delivery in developed vs. undeveloped regions of the world are emphasized.
Prerequisite: BPH 206.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

NUR 311. Theories and Concepts of Nursing. 2 Credit Hours.

An introductory nursing course explaining the philosophy of baccalaureate nursing using the major concepts of person, environment, health, and nursing with a multicultural focus.
Requisite: Nursing Major and Sophomore Standing or Higher.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

NUR 314. Health Assessment and Promotion. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to health assessment using a lifespan approach. Emphasis is on the development of data collection and basic decision-making using health assessment findings.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

NUR 315. Pathophysiology. 3 Credit Hours.

The study of the physiologic and biologic manifestations of disease and disease processes. Emphasis is placed on physiology of altered health within the context of disruptions of structure and function of the human body as a whole.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

NUR 317. Theories in Growth and Development. 3 Credit Hours.

Application of growth and development theories through the lifespan with a case study approach to issues commonly encountered nursing practice in a variety of clinical settings.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

NUR 318. Women's Health Nursing. 4 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the use of the nursing process in the care of women and the care of mothers and newborns with an emphasis on health promotion, illness prevention and nursing clinical management of chronic and acute conditions.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

NUR 319. Contemporary Issues in Bioethics for Health Care. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will cover bioethical issues in the health care environment, including ethical principles, theories and decision making strategies. WRITING COURSE
Prerequisite: BPH 206.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 320. Child and Adolescent Health Nursing. 4 Credit Hours.

This course focuses in the use of the nursing process to develop and implement nursing management strategies for children and their families experiencing acute, chronic, and critical multi-system health alterations within a multicultural content. Use of the nursing process to expand and develop appropriate clinical interventions and a member of the health care team. Students will build on foundation skills in critical thinking, collaboration, and leadership in the provision of nursing care.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

NUR 350. Pathophysiology/Pharmacology for RN-to-BSN. 4 Credit Hours.

This course presents the study of the physiological and biologic manifestations of disease and disease processes, and introduces the basic principles of therapeutic pharmacology. Emphasis is placed on the physiology of altered health within the context of disruptions of structure and function of the human body as a whole. Special consideration of cultural beliefs and folk medicine is included.
Requisite: Must be in the RN to BSN program.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 390. Advanced Placement Practice I for RN-to-BSN Students. 10 Credit Hours.

Nursing Management of the client throughout adulthood who experiences altercations and/or adaptations/maladaptions in physicologic defense mechanisms; complex alteration and/or adaptations in organ system function. The client in this course is identified as the individual, family or significant others. Course content empasizes concepts of infection, the surgical client, immunity and altered cell growth, utilizing the nursing theories and the nursing process. Assists adult clients to adjust to multisystem alterations/adaptations/maladaptions in the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immunological and hemopoeitic, nervous, musculoskeletal, digestive, and renal urinary systems. Specific models are utilized to enhance the teaching of critical thinking. Research findings are utilized to support nursing interventions.
Requisite: Must be in the RN to BSN program.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 400. Theories, Research and Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Credit Hours.

Course emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the research process and application of research findings in community-based practice in multicultural settings. Course focuses on the relationship between theory, research, practice, and the development of competencies to become an informed consumer of research. Writing Credit.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

NUR 401. Evidence-Based Nursing Practice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines evidence-based practice in nursing. Focuses on the research process; location, critical appraisal, and evaluation of evidence; application and evaluation of evidence-based practice changes; and quality improvement.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Summer.

NUR 402. Global Health Disparities Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a 4 week intensive educational experience that prepares students to be successful conducting supervised health disparities research as part of the MHIRT program at a foreign institution, disseminating findings, and applying to graduate school. The training program is broken into a preparation phase (3 weeks prior to leaving to their host country), and a dissemination phase (1 week after they return). Students will be working as a research assistant at a foreign site for eight weeks in between the preparation and dissemination phases of this training program. Students will learn about the influence of culture and healthcare policy on health and health disparities, research design, statistics, communicating research findings and careers in health disparities research.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 403. Advanced Placement Practice II for RN-to-BSN Students. 10 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the nursing process in the care of pediatric clients and families, the obstetrical client, and women's health. Emphasis is on the use of the nursing process to assist clients to adapt to health alterations requiring care in secondary health care settings. This course covers care of the pediatric client and the childbearing client and women's health.
Requisite: Must be in the RN to BSN program.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 405. Professionalism and Career Pathways. 3 Credit Hours.

This nursing course focuses on the assessment and development of a career pathway for registered nurses seeking a Bachelor’s in the Science of Nursing professional nursing practice. There will be a focus on concepts of professionalism, roles in nursing, advanced practice, diversity, culture and a critical analysis of legal, ethical and political dimensions of nursing practice.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 408. Genetics and Healthcare. 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of basic knowledge in genomics, understanding of social, cultural and psychological implications of genetic services, health prevention and promotion.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

NUR 411. Adult Health III. 5 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the adult experiencing complex multisystem alteration/adaptations in organ and system function. Emphasis is on the use of the nursing process to assist adult clients to adapt to system related insults.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

NUR 412. Epidemiology for Population-Based Care. 2 Credit Hours.

During this course students will examine the principles of epidemiology including, the historical evolution of epidemiology, the natural history of disease, epidemiologic models, and epidemiologic research. Health and disease is conceptualized as a complex interaction between individual relationships, community and socio-economic-politico level factors with unique considerations for target populations across the lifespan. The process of disease surveillance is discussed including trends in communicable and non-communicable disease as well as the measures of morbidity (e.g., incidence and prevalence) and mortality. Factors, or determinants of health, that contribute to distribution of disease in populations are discussed. The effect of health care policy and health economics on disease distribution is considered. How the interaction of the determinants of health, health care policy, and health economics contribute to health disparities is also examined. Disease surveillance and health promotion are examined from a global perspective. The impact of the environment on health is also discussed. Finally, introductory disaster management concepts are reviewed as they relate to the care of populations affected by disasters.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Summer.

NUR 414. Advanced Placemment Practice III for RN-to-BSN Students. 10 Credit Hours.

Content emphasizes concepts and themes of families and communities and the use of the nursing process to assist in promoting and maintaining health. The behavioral health focusses on psychotherapeutic processes across the life span Emphasis is on planning nursing care for individuals, families and groups and p rofessional and theraputic communication skills and techniques. Explores the influence of neuro-physiology and psychopharmacology on the development of psychiatric and mental health services and the evolution of the role of the psychiatric nurse.
Requisite: Must be in the RN to BSN program.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 415. Perianesthesia Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

The focus of this course is on the use of the nursing process to develop and implement nursing management strategies for patients and families undergoing a surgical and/or special procedure. Emphasis is placed on the use of a multicultural nursing perspective to plan and implement nursing interventions. This course highlights Perianesthesia nursing care of surgical patients.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 417. Pre-Immersion Course for Accelerated Option Students. 0 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to facilitate personal and professional success; this course introduces students to the purposes and processes of nursing. An emphasis is placed on study, communication, and critical thinking skills that support academic achievement. Students also examine the relationship between learning and motivation.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: DIL.
Grading: NON.
Typically Offered: Spring & Summer.

NUR 418. Pre-Immersion for Traditional Option Students. 0 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to facilitate personal and professional success; this course introduces students to the purposes and processes of nursing. An emphasis is placed on study, communication, and critical thinking skills that support academic achievement. Students also examine the relationship between learning and motivation.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: NON.
Typically Offered: Fall.

NUR 424. Math Essentials for BSN Students. 0 Credit Hours.

This course supports students with basic to advanced medical math concepts. Topics include calculating dosages, using scientific formulas and basic statistical principles.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 426. Leadership & Management in Nursing. 5 Credit Hours.

Analysis and synthesis of the application of professional concepts in a variety of multicultural health care delivery systems. Emphasis is placed on personal, professional, and organizational growth. Individualized and integrated clinical experiences are provided through direct clinical supervision by preceptors.
Requisite: Must be in the RN to BSN program.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

NUR 430. Leadership in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

Theoretical and applied concepts of transition to the nursing role within the healthcare setting are explored in this course. The focus is on practice issues and responsibilities in contemporary professional nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the transition to practice and nursing care systems with increasing responsibility through discussion of practice theory and styles, empowering, mentoring, managing change and striving for excellence. Seminar discussion topics will focus on the issues of successful transition to the practice environment as new nurse.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

NUR 435. Clinical Express Undgr. 5.00 Credit Hours.

This course is an online orientation for clinical faculty at the School of Nursing and Health Studies. The content is specific to clinical instructors who will be supervising BSN nursing students at various clinical sites used by the School of Nursing and Health Studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

NUR 440. Population Focused Nursing. 4 Credit Hours.

The focus is on population-focused nursing and community-oriented approaches to understanding and addressing major public health concerns across the life spam. Emphasis is on assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating programs for a variety of communities both domestically and internationally. Health and dis ease is conceptualized as a complex interaction between individual, relationship, community and socio-economic-politic level factors. Epidemiology, sociology, behavioral sciences and nursing theory and practice are integrated throughout. Special attention is given to addressing the unique needs of vulnerable populations and cultural groups, the elimination of health disparities, and social justice.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 441. Public Health Nursing. 2 Credit Hours.

The focus of this course is on public health nursing and community-oriented approaches to addressing major public health concerns across the life span. Emphasis is on assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating programs for a variety of communities both domestically and internationally. The provision of knowledge related to epidemiology, sociology, behavioral sciences and nursing theory and practice is required throughout this process. Special attention is given to addressing the unique needs of vulnerable populations and cultural groups, the elimination of health disparities, and social justice considering the population aggregate’s determinants of health. Finally, the varying roles of the public health nurse are examined, including that of the public health nurse in disaster response.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

NUR 448. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing. 4 Credit Hours.

The focus in on psychotherapeutic processes across the life span. Emphasis is on planning nursing care for individuals, families, and communities with a variety of psychiatric and mental health problems in various settings (inpatient, outpatient, community). Professional and therapeutic communication skills and techniques are important components of this course.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

NUR 453. Role Transition. 5 Credit Hours.

Theoretical and applied concepts of transition to the nursing role within the healthcare setting are integrated in this course. The course is a synthesis of previously learned knowledge, incorporating the components of physiological, psychological, and developmental concerns in the care of the client. Seminar discussion topics have a focus on the issues of successful transition to the practice environment as a nurse generalist, with the ability to exercise clinical reasoning and evidence-based practice.
Requisite: Must be a Nursing Clinical Major.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

NUR 461. Health Disparities Research Practicum. 1-4 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide opportunities for students across all levels of higher education to participate in health disparities research. Students will be mentored by a health disparities researcher with an active research project. Objectives will be established by the research mentor and the student according to educational level, interests and opportunities. Students will be incorporated into the research team and expected to attend project meetings. They will also be expected to participate in scholarly work that could contribute to the success of the project. Examples of scholarly work include co-authoring research papers and presentations, developing recruitment materials, assisting in compiling/developing data collection measures, or any other product deemed appropriate by the mentor.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 487. International Health: Transcultural Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

Collaborative clinical venture between the University of Miami, School of Nursing and an International School of Nursing. Students will exchange supervised western clinical experiences, knowledge and skills for the care of clients and families in specialty areas including Medical-Surgical, Surgery, Intensive Care and/or Emergency nursing units. This course will allow students to apply and synthesize basic science knowledge and skills that foster ethical, legal and culture specific health care.
Requisite: School of Nursing Health Studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 498. Selected Topics. 6.00 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 499. Selected Topics. 6.00 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

NUR 536. U.S. Health Care Crisis: Politics and Policies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore key health policy issues within the U.S., along with the politics and interest groups which shape them. Fundamental concerns within the health care system such as: cost, quality and access to care will be analyzed. Major topics of discussion will include: Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, the nursing shortage, and prescription drugs. The politics and policies surrounding issues such as bioethics, globalization, and infectious disease will also be considered.
Requisite: Junior Status and no IP Credit.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

NUR OOO. Nursing. 1-30 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.