http://www.as.miami.edu/anthropology

Dept. Code:  APY

Introduction

Anthropology is the scientific study of humankind, from its beginnings to the present. Of the many sciences that study aspects of humans and their behavior, only anthropology attempts to understand and integrate the entire panorama of human culture and biology in all times and places.

The Anthropology Department offers a wide range of courses for students in pursuit of the Bachelor of Arts degree, from the basic four fields of cultural anthropology, linguistics, biological anthropology, and archaeology, to advanced study of topics such as  Maya archaeology, non-Western medical practices, primatology, gender and sexuality, and the evolution of language, among many others.

Anthropological training concentrates on broadly transferable skill areas such as understanding human diversity, building research skills for collecting and making sense of information, and communicating effectively.  The skills developed through completing a degree in anthropology are useful for living and working in today’s globalized world, which increasingly means interacting with people from many different cultural backgrounds and nations.

The field is especially suited to a multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, and multi-cultural urban center such as Miami, and the research programs of the department faculty reflect the compositions and concerns of our larger community.

Anthropological knowledge has taken an increasing role in the solution of practical problems in public health, cultural resource and heritage management, international business, legal and human rights issues, and many other areas.  The anthropological view challenges ethnocentric perspectives and encourages the rigorous exploration of the world's cultural diversity.

Educational Objectives

Students who graduate from our program in anthropology will have achieved:

  1. Basic familiarity with each of the four subfields of our discipline: archaeology, cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and physical or biological anthropology.
  2. Extended familiarity with one or more of these subfields in terms of knowledge of content, e.g. area ethnology in Latin America and/or the Caribbean; topical knowledge such as substance use and abuse, gender, food, primate behavior, art, ritual, museums and collections, material culture, and/or world languages;  and methodological skills involving field research in one or more of the subfields.
  3. The ability to articulate the anthropological view of the human condition in terms of an operational definition of culture and a holistic perspective on how humans behave.
  4. Sufficient skill in research to be able to produce a research paper based on  original anthropological investigation.

To satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences writing requirement in the discipline, students majoring in anthropology should take at least two courses designated as W (writing intensive) offered in the department.

Degree Programs

The Department of Anthropology offers a major and a minor in the University’s array of Bachelor of Arts Degrees.

Departmental Honors

A student with junior or senior standing and a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher may earn honors in anthropology by completion of  a qualifying senior thesis encompassing an original research agenda under the direction of a member of the faculty in the Department of Anthropology.  The scope of work will be set in a thesis proposal approved by at least two faculty (one may be from outside the Department) which will result in a submitted (although not necessarily accepted) manuscript/conference paper.  Students who wish to complete a senior thesis shall enroll in senior thesis/independent study classes for at least two semesters (with three being ideal, or two plus summer), such that one semester could be devoted to a directed reading, one to data collections/analysis, and the final semester to writing. 

Extraordinary Anthropology majors are also recognized via an invitation to join Lambda Alpha, the international honors society for anthropology.  Lambda Alpha was founded with the purpose of encouraging and recognizing outstanding scholarship and research in anthropology.  Each year the Department recognizes a graduating senior with the highest academic achievement both in and outside of the classroom with the Zora Neale Hurston Award in Anthropology.

Major in Anthropology

Minor in Anthropology

APY 100. Introduction to Forensic Investigation. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will go into the field to gain an introductory understanding about skelatal identification and crime lab processes.
Requisite: Plan of Summer Scholar Program.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 101. Introduction to Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

A broad overview of archaeology, cultural anthropology, biological anthropology , and linguistics.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

APY 105. HIV: Sex, Science, and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

The important role that science plays and has played in amellorating suffering for mankind. We will include an analysis of the scientific, human, and policy-related issues associated with HIV/AIDS.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 109. Anthropology of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Through themes such as myth, word and text, symbol, gender, pilgrimage, embodiment, and ritual, students learn about lived religion through anthropological research and field methods. The course also exposes introductory-level students to diverse world religious traditions: Korean folk religion, Indonesian Islam, Hinduism in diaspora, Judaism across cultures, Japanese temple Shinto traditions, and more.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.

APY 200. Introduction to Forensic Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will learn the basics of the human bone structure and how it relates to anthropology and forensic studies.
Requisite: Plan of Summer Scholar Program.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 201. Principles of Archaeology. 3 Credit Hours.

History, methods, and theory of archaeology with an outline of the main characteristics of the prehistoric record throughout the world.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

APY 202. Principles of Cultural Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

Cultural anthropology, including such topics as economics, politics, kinship and families, health systems, religion, and personality.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

APY 203. Principles of Physical Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

The origin and biological development of the human species; human evolution explored by means of the fossil record of prehistoric population; differentiation and adaptation of contemporary populations in various world environments; the comparison of humans and other primates with respect to biological and behavioral variability.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

APY 204. Principles of Linguistic Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

Human linguistic principles of phonology, morphology, and grammar to construct a framework for understanding the operation of language in cultural context. The functions of human language in structuring ideological, economic, and political realms.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 205. Medicine, Health Care In Society. 3 Credit Hours.

A sociohistorical analysis of the intersection between medicine, health care and society, using examples throughout the world. It will reflect on 'taking-for-granted' concepts such as the 'body, risk, illness and healing' and their relationships to culture, power, and society, as well as the plurality of narratives and discourses on health and healing practices.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

APY 208. Short-Changed in the City. 3 Credit Hours.

Marginalization plagues sub-populations in almost every large city. An anthropological view of this problem and its origins, presented through readings, discussions, lectures and field trips.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 230. The Sounds of the World's Languages. 3 Credit Hours.

The range of sounds produced by the speakers of the world's languages. An introduction to phonetics, with a focus on acoustically-oriented methods used in contemporary phonetics.
Prerequisite: APY 204.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 300. Societies and Cultures in Latin America and the Caribbean. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to give students an understanding of issues related to social and processes in Latin American and Caribbean societies, with emphasis on history, class, gender, ethnicity, religion, politics and power, family and migration processes as well as literary and artistic creations. We will begin our study by analyzing the sociohistorical 'production' of these regions, subject formation and processes of political organizing.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 301. World Prehistory. 3 Credit Hours.

The global prehistoric record, with emphasis on the development of social complexity and ancient states.
Prerequisite: APY 201.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 302. Ethnographies of Black Life. 3 Credit Hours.

Themes that have shaped Anthropology's engagement with Black Life. Critique between Black Studies and the social Sciences with particular focus on the discipline of anthropology, interrogation of the methods and theoretical frameworks employed to empirically distill the social conditions and political formations of black diasporic peoples.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 306. Human Evolution. 3 Credit Hours.

The macroevolution of humans using the fossil record of vertebrates, including the development of uniquely human behavioral and anatomical adaptations, and of diversity in living populations.
Prerequisite: APY 201 or APY 203.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 307. Human Adaptation. 3 Credit Hours.

Human biological adaptation to different environments and stress is examined anthropologically within an evolutionary framework. Mechanisms of adaptation to temperature extremes and other climatic variables, high altitude, disease, nutritional stress, urbanization, extraterrestrial conditions, and other environmental challenges are described in relation to biological and behavioral variations among human populations. The limits of human performance and human adaptive potential in the present and future are explored.
Prerequisite: APY 201 and APY 202 and APY 203 and BIL 101 and BIL 109.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 309. Evolution of Human Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Origins and evolution of human behaviors as determined by fossil and archaeological evidence, primate research, and the cross-cultural analysis of behavioral variations in contemporary societies. The interaction of human biological and behavioral evolution.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 310. Primate Behavior and Adaptation. 3 Credit Hours.

The taxonomy, distribution, anatomy, social behavior and adaptations to habitats of human and non-human primates as seen from an evolutionary perspective.
Prerequisite: APY 203 and BIL 150.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 315. Folk and Alternative Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

Historical and cultural backgrounds of health therapies, including theoretical bases of traditional ethnomedical, nonwestern, and complementary medical systems.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 320. The Evolution of Language. 3 Credit Hours.

Popular contemporary hypotheses on the origins and development of language.
Prerequisite: APY 204.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 340. Marine Archaeology. 3 Credit Hours.

Location, excavation, and study of submerged sites.
Prerequisite: APY 201.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 345. Blood And Chocolate: Ancient Civilizations Of Mesoamerica. 3 Credit Hours.

An archaeological approach to understanding the major pre-Columbian cultures of Mesoamerica, from Olmec to Aztec periods, with emphasis on the ancient Maya. The particular accomplishments of this area such as the domestication of chocolate and corn, hieroglyphic writing, and elaborate sacrificial rituals will be explored.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 356. Florida Archaeology. 3 Credit Hours.

Archaeological remains of ancient cultures in the Florida pensinula, from initial occupation to the Colonial Period.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 360. Anthropology of Food. 3 Credit Hours.

Evolution of human diet, basic nutrition, food taboos, effects of domestication , effects of diet on skeletal remains, analysis of your own food habits, and the impact of certain foods on our biocultural evolution of our species.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 361. Gender and Language. 3 Credit Hours.

The ways in which language is used in the constitution of gender from a cross-cultural perspective. Course is co-listed with WGS 361
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

APY 362. The Languages of the World. 3 Credit Hours.

The world's languages. The primary focus is on major differences and similarities among the structural properties of languages from diverse regions and linguistic families. In short, an introduction to linguistic typology.
Prerequisite: APY 204.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 376. Economic Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

The structure and operation of the small-scale economy in the social system is examined. The interrelationship between social and economic systems, and the formation of non-market economies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 377. Anthropology of Political Systems and Discourse. 3 Credit Hours.

Political systems and processes in tribal societies, with special emphasis on dispute settlement, the organization of political control, and the use of oratory. Case studies from Latin American and African examples.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 384. Caribbean Archaeology. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of human lifeways in the Antillean archipelago from first settlement through the development of complex socio-political structures in the Late Ceramic Age and ultimately the arrival of European and African migrants.
Prerequisite: APY 201.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 385. Caribbean Cultures. 3 Credit Hours.

Caribbean societies, including ethnic diversity, production and exchange, domestic organization, and belief systems.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 391. Gender in Ancient Cultures. 3 Credit Hours.

A cross-cultural examination of the role gender played in ancient complex culture areas, such as Mesoamerica, Mesopotamia, and the Mediterranean, with emphasis on using the archaeological record to reconstruct social roles.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 392. Sex and Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

A cross-cultural examination of sex roles and sexuality; gender identity, division of labor, functions of marriage, sexual practices, reproductive control, and political relationships between the sexes.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 393. Drugs and Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

Cross cultural review of human drug use with special attention to the use of drugs in cultural context.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 394. Comparative Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

A cross-cultural investigation of differing levels of religious belief systems examined from both etic and emic points of view.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 395. Gender, Race, & Class. 3 Credit Hours.

To explore human differences, we will interrogate common sense as: thinking about gender, race, and class. Certain queries will be addressed. What roles do scientific practice, political systems, and popular media play in shaping our thinking about differences? Where do we draw the line between biological fact and social construction? How do these facets of identity intersect and inform individuals' everyday experiences? How might knowledge allow us to speak truth to power when institutional oppression occurs? An anthropological perspective will provide the central frame, though feminism, history, medicine, biology, psychology, and law will inform our considerations.
Prerequisite: APY 202 or WGS 201.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 396. Youth Culture, Identity and Globalization. 3 Credit Hours.

Youth cultural practices and experiences in various urban contexts in the world. Particular emphasis is placed on marginalization, identity and commodification of violent practices as embedded in the globalization processes.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 397. Violence And Ritual. 3 Credit Hours.

Various theories of ritual and violence with reference to ethnographically- based topics. It will explore the role of symbols, rituals and ideologies in shaping and contesting power within nations and other political communities.
Prerequisite: APY 202.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 398. Coastal Cultures. 3 Credit Hours.

Fishermen and their special relations to the environment, from Thailand and Sri Lanka to Alaska and the West Indies. Decision-making processes among fishermen, business concepts, responses to technology and myths of the sea.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 399. The Anthropology of Kinship and Family in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Theories of kinship and the family. It will examine emergence of new patterns of kinship networks and construction of individuals. Ethnographic materials will be drawn from the Americas and the Caribbean, particularly Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica and the United States.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 405. Readings in Anthropology. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Supervised readings on special topics in Anthropology.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 406. Readings in Anthropology. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Supervised readings on special topics in Anthropology.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 413. Medical Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

Cross-cultural and historical perspectives on health and illness in human evolution. Effects of heredity, environment, and culture upon human disease ecology. Biological and behavioral adaptations to disease.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 414. Forensic Anthropology I: Human Osteology. 3 Credit Hours.

Identification and interpretation of the human skeleton, including age, sex, hard tissue pathology and traumas.
Prerequisite: APY 203.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 415. Forensic Anthropology II: Fieldwork. 3 Credit Hours.

The investigation, analyses, and legal aspects of human remains recovered from crime scenes and mass disasters.
Prerequisite: APY 203 or APY 414.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

APY 416. Bioarchaeology-Peopling the past. 3 Credit Hours.

Contextualization of bodies in space, cultural milieu and time are the primary focus of this course. Students will explore bioarchaeology's history, development and major topical concerns.
Prerequisite: APY 201 or APY 203.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 417. Archaeometry: The Science Of Material Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

The archaeological application of a physical science (physics, chemistry, geology, etc.) techniques to answer pertinent anthropological questions about past societies.
Prerequisite: APY 201.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 418. Seminar in Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

Consideration of special topics in physical anthropology, linguistics, archaeology and ethnology and their interrelationships.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

APY 419. Politics of the Past. 3 Credit Hours.

The intersection of archaeology, politics, capitalism, and discrimination to consider the presentation, misconstrual, revision, and reclamation of the past. Lecturing will be kept to a minimum, as the bulk of the class will be devoted to discussion and debate.
Prerequisite: APY 201.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 420. Archaeology, Architecture, and the City. 3 Credit Hours.

Ancient architectural remains in the global anthropological perspective, emphasizing the role of architecture in shaping the evolution of social and political interactions.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 421. Interpreting Bodies. 3 Credit Hours.

Perceptions, represenations, and regulation of the physical body as a gendered and sexual site, as a source of pleasure, as a means of social validation, and as an object of coercion. Writing Credit. Lecturing will be kept to a minimum, as the bulk of the class will be devoted to discussion and debate.
Prerequisite: APY 202 and WGS 201.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 422. Pseudoscience in Archaeology. 3 Credit Hours.

Reconstructions of how people lived in the past that claim scientific validity, use the terminology of science, but are unsupported by evidence, can be called pseudoscientific. This course critically evaluates the field of pseudoscientific archaeology by applying the scientific method, logic, and common sense.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 423. Paleopathology: Health and disease in ancient peoples. 3 Credit Hours.

Paleopathology aims to familiarize students with the range of health conditions that present in preserved human remains and to explain the linkages between disease prevalence and culture, economics, and politics.
Prerequisite: APY 414 and APY 416.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 435. Anthropology of Nature and Environment. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the anthropological investigation of nature, biology, and environment. Taking examples from cultural anthropology and the subfields of environmental anthropology, political ecology, and the anthropology of science, the course builds an understanding of the various ways in which ideas about nature and human nature and nature making practices shape our contemporary world: its places, spaces, life forms, and forms of life.
Prerequisite: APY 202.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 480. Undergrad Internship Anthrology. 3-9 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the undergraduate internship is practical application of coursework to hands-on learning with field and laboratory research conducted in partnership with an academic, governmental, non-profit and/or private sector business entity. The goal is to acquire and practice skill sets required for advancement in professional careers. Students may elect to participate in more than one internship because of the four-field approach of the discipline of Anthropology.
Prerequisite: APY 201 or APY 202 or APY 203 or APY 204.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

APY 484. Anthropological Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

Theoretical frameworks directing data collection and research methodology in anthropology.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 485. Archeological Theory and Technique. 3 Credit Hours.

Theoretical traditions that shape modern archaeological research design and interpretation.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

APY 486. Advanced Colloquy in Black Feminist Theory and Praxis: Major Works of 7 Black Feminist Thinkers. 3 Credit Hours.


Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

APY 501. Methods of Anthropological Research. 3-6 Credit Hours.

Concentration on research methods for Cultural, Archaeological, Linguistic, and/or Biological Anthropology.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 502. Field Studies in Anthropology. 3-6 Credit Hours.

Field research in advanced topics in Cultural, Archaeological, Linguistic and/or Biological Anthropology. Preparation of data for professional presentation and publication is stressed.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

APY 505. Museum Internship. 3 Credit Hours.

Field work and on-site experience in museum studies conducted in conjunction with the major museums in Miami. Training and research in methods and techniques in museology.
Prerequisite: APY 201.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

APY 506. Workshop in Anthropology. 3-6 Credit Hours.

This course is designed for upper level and graduate students to participate in special topics in Anthropology and related fields.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

APY 511. Artlab At Lowe. 3 Credit Hours.

Organizing an art exhibition at the Lowe Art Museum. Taught by a different faculty member each year.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

APY 512. Advanced Medical Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

Applications of theories and methods of medical anthropology to problems in human health and disease.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

APY 518. Advanced Seminar in Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

Specialized topics in Anthropology to involve students into current research specializations.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.