General Information

The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine enrolls approximately 200 students each year. It has been a long-standing policy of the School of Medicine to admit students with diverse backgrounds. Therefore, qualified non-traditional students, women, socio-economically disadvantaged students, and minorities underrepresented in medicine, are especially encouraged to apply.

U.S. Citizenship

All applicants must be US citizens or permanent residents of the United States with an alien registration receipt (green) card in their possession at the time they complete the AMCAS application. Applicants who apply as permanent residents will be required to submit a photocopy of their alien registration receipt card.

Florida Residents

Since the School of Medicine is no longer subsidized by the State of Florida, Florida residents are not given preference in admissions decisions. For tuition purposes, a Florida resident is one whose parents or guardians (or the applicant, if independent) have established legal residence in, and resided permanently in, the State of Florida for twelve consecutive months immediately prior to the first day of classes. Applicants cannot claim Florida residency simply based on the fact that they lived in Florida coincident with attending a college or university. To receive initial consideration as a Florida resident, applicants must declare Florida as their state of residence on their AMCAS application. Exceptions to this requirement will not be granted.

Residents of Other States

The Miller School of Medicine has made a significant commitment to enroll more students from outside the state of Florida. This departure from previous policy reflects the growing national prominence of the School of Medicine and the national and international reputation of our clinical facilities and specialty centers, and our outstanding research programs.

Financial Assistance Information

The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine is a private medical school. It has been a priority of the medical school to keep the tuition and fees very reasonable. Please visit our Financial Assistance Website. (http://mededu.med.miami.edu/contact-us/student- financial-assistance/)

Additional Information

For additional information, write, call, or send an email message to:

Office of Admissions (R-159)

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine PO Box 016159

Miami, FL 33101

(305)-243-3234

(305)-243-6548 (FAX)

med.admissions@miami.edu (admissions@miami.edu)

Curriculum Requirements

The NextGenMD curriculum is divided into 3 phases.  We discussed Phase 1 and Medicine as a Profession (MAP) in detail at our prior Faculty Senate presentation when Phase 1 including MAP was fully approved; the focus here is on Phase 2, Phase 3, and Scholarly Concentration.

Phase 1 is grounded in the foundational and translational sciences that are taught and learned in a case-based format that incorporates laboratory and clinical science, health systems science, social determinants of health, core clinical skills, and professionalism. Phase 1 is completed over 14 months, inclusive of 2 months of summer capstone work.

  • Phase 1a is 4 weeks and largely under the Medicine as a Profession longitudinal theme (see later).
  • Phase 1b is 12 weeks and is comprised of foundational, clinical, health systems sciences taught in the context of the healthy patient.
  • Phase 1c is 30 weeks and incorporates foundational, clinical, and health systems sciences taught in a symptom-based format.

Phase 2 consists of integrated clinical clerkships, where continued themes of foundational, clinical, and health systems sciences are embedded within clerkships. Each integrated clinic clerkship block has well defined core topics and learning outcomes mapped to the corresponding entrustable professional activities as defined by the AAMC.

  • Phase 2 is completed over 12 months and begins with an introductory “Transition to the Clerkships” course that covers core content areas: defining the medical student role, interprofessional teamwork, basic procedural skills, basic documentation skills, self-directed learning techniques, and how to be an effective learner in the clinical setting. Additionally, the course covers content that is reinforced throughout the entire phase including social determinants of health, patient safety, leadership and health advocacy, wellness promotion, and quality improvement.
  • Phase 2 is divided into four, 12-week integrated clerkships as follows: Medicine as a Profession (inpatient/outpatient Internal Medicine and its subspecialties), Women and Children’s Health (Obstetrics/Gyn and Pediatrics), From the ER to the OR (Surgery, Anesthesia, Emergency Medicine), and Mind, Matter and Medicine (Neurology, Psychiatry, Family Medicine). 
  • During each integrated clerkship block, foundational science and longitudinal thematic content is delivered using multiple modalities including online learning and interactive small group sessions, in addition to case-based collaborative learning that occurs in the introductory week and continues weekly during each clerkship block.
  • The foundational science content includes Anatomy/Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Microbiology/Immunology, Pharmacology, and Physiology; the longitudinal thematic content includes Oncology, Genetics, Radiology, and Pathology.
  • Multimodal assessment methods will be used during Phase 2 including objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE), National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject exams, quizzes, case discussions, case presentations with write-ups, faculty and housestaff evaluations, and journal article presentations, among others.
  • Each 12-week clerkship has intentional integration of core concepts across specialties, including dedicated time for specialty-specific boot camp experiences.
  • Scholarly Concentration and Medicine as a Profession content are delivered at pre-determined sessions during the integrated clinical clerkships as well as during Milepost weeks.

Between Phases 2 and 3, students are provided dedicated time to prepare for and take USMLE Steps 1 and 2CK.

Phase 3 occurs over 17 months and allows all students to develop a personalized pathway of excellence in a specialized area of interest, including scholarly work, dual/joint degree pursuits, or an early transition to residency. All students are required to select a pathway of emphasis for their scholarly work or obtain a dual degree from a selection of existing 4-6-year dual/joint degrees in addition to new 4- year dual/joint degrees being developed. A select group of students who meet defined competencies can enter residency early after 3 years. The accelerated pathway to residency is available to no more than 10% of the class and includes residency programs within our institution. Phase 3 is dedicated to career exploration, advanced integrated science selectives, advanced clinical selectives, a critical care experience, a sub-internship, and preparation for internship. Students have opportunities to explore their interests through a variety of elective experiences both at University of Miami and other accredited medical schools. Scholarly pathways start in Phase 1 will continue in Phase 3 and culminate in the presentation of a capstone project. Dual and joint degree students will complete their degree requirements during Phase 3.  Below are the required courses in Phase 3.

1) Sub-Internship: The sub-internship (sub-I) experience offered during Phase 3 (to start January 2023) is intended to provide a learning experience for the students that prepares them to serve as competent interns and effective members of an interdisciplinary team. All sub-internships are expected to provide an opportunity for students to learn and demonstrate competency in core objectives (available in a supplemental document). The sub-internship is a 4 week inpatient experience.

2) Advanced Integrated Science Selective: Phase 3 students who have successfully completed Phase 2 clerkships are required to choose one selective (4 weeks duration) from a variety of advanced integrated science options that explicitly translate foundational science to clinical practice and allow students to reinforce important foundational science concepts taught in Phase 1 and 2. These selectives emphasize interactive teaching methods and explore basic science topics that are related to students’ career choices or academic interests.  This is a 4 week experience.

3) Advanced Clinical Selective: The student will be given the opportunity to exercise critical clinical thinking and patient care skills (e.g. diagnosis, prognosis, and management) while under the direct supervision of attending physicians and senior residents/fellows. The attending and resident physicians will model the principles and commitments of a physician’s professional life. Students will follow the care of assigned patients with the responsible physician. The students must be able to work up and manage the medical or surgical care of selected patients under the supervision of residents and attending physicians. This may include both outpatient and inpatient experiences and is 4 weeks in duration.

4) Critical Care Selective: All students are required to complete a 2 week rotation in a critical care setting of their choice (SICU, MICU, CCU, NICU, Pediatric ICU) to become comfortable with the basics tenets of the care of acutely ill patients.

5) Transition to Internship/Residency: In the semester of Phase 3, students will have a 2-week didactic and experiential course to review content necessary for becoming an effective intern. An additional 2 weeks will be spent in a specialty-specific course learning the tools needed by an intern in a boot camp within their career of choice.

The Scholarly Concentration houses formalized research pathways and the Dual and Joint degree programs. Each student is required to either complete a second degree or participate in a pathway program, culminating in a capstone research project. The goal is to create well-rounded, transformational leaders in academic medicine through a formalized program of topical study paralleling every medical student's clinical training. Every student will have a basis in practical applications of population health, and a fundamental understanding of research methodology and practical application.  There are currently 26 Pathways and 3 four-year dual/joint degree programs with more being developed and 5-8 year dual/joint degrees also available.  Pathway students are required to complete a 2-credit course in the Spring semester of Year 1 (Introduction to the Pathway) which includes didactic instruction and the beginning of mentored research, 1 credit of mentored research (Capstone Research) in the summer of the first year, and a 3 credit advanced clinical research elective in Phase 3. The mentored research project culminates in the generation of a scholarly concentration portfolio comprising a written report and a public poster presentation in the final Spring semester. Accelerated Pathway to Residency students have a slightly different schedule for completion of these credits due to the varied requirements for completion of Phase 3 (5 months rather than 17 months). Students enrolled in a dual or joint degree program must complete the MD curriculum and that of their second degree for graduation and therefore are not required to participate in a Pathway. These degree programs generally require at least 30 credits, including 3-6 credits for research; such activities thus fulfill the requirements for scholarly concentration work required of students enrolled in Pathways of Emphasis.  Research training and mentorship in NextGenMD are part of the formalized curriculum to both alleviate pressure on students as well as improving the quality of their research education. 

MD Curriculum

Phase 1: Pre-Clerkship
MDR 550Introduction to the Medical Profession3
MDR 526Biomedical Principles of Health I5
MDR 527Biomedical Principles of Health II5
MDR 531Medicine as a Profession 14
MDR 532Medicine as a Profession 24
MDR 533Medicine as a Profession 31
MDR 520Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 13
MDR 521Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 24
MDR 522Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 36
MDR 523Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 43
MDR 524Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 56
MDR 525Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 65
MDR 535Introduction to Scholarly Concentration2
MDR 536Scholarly Concentration I0
MDR 537Scholarly Concentration II1
Phase 2: Integrated Clerkships
MDR ### Transition to Clerkship1
MDR 715Integrated Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology12
MDR 716Integrated Surgery, Emergency Medicine, and Anesthesiology12
MDR 717Integrated Medicine12
MDR 718Integrated Psychiatry, Neurology, and Family Medicine12
MDR ### Medicine as a Profession Clerkships 11
MDR ### Medicine as a Profession Clerkships 23
MDR ### Medicine as a Profession Clerkships 32
Phase 3: Advanced
MDR ### Sub-Internship4
MDR ### Clinical Selective4
MDR ### Integrated Science Selective4
MDR ### Critical Care Selective2
MDR ### Transition to Residency2
MDR ### Specialty Boot Camp2
Electives14
MDR ### Scholarly Concentration3
Total Credit Hours142

Accelerated Pathway

Phase 1: Pre-Clerkship
MDR 550Introduction to the Medical Profession3
MDR 526Biomedical Principles of Health I5
MDR 527Biomedical Principles of Health II5
MDR 531Medicine as a Profession 14
MDR 532Medicine as a Profession 24
MDR 533Medicine as a Profession 31
MDR 520Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 13
MDR 521Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 24
MDR 522Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 36
MDR 523Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 43
MDR 524Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 56
MDR 525Symptoms, Signs, and Disease 65
MDR 535Introduction to Scholarly Concentration2
MDR 536Scholarly Concentration I2
MDR 537Scholarly Concentration II6
Phase 2: Integrated Clerkships
MDR ### Transition to Clerkship1
MDR 715Integrated Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology12
MDR 716Integrated Surgery, Emergency Medicine, and Anesthesiology12
MDR 717Integrated Medicine12
MDR 718Integrated Psychiatry, Neurology, and Family Medicine12
MDR ### Medicine as a Profession Clerkships 11
MDR ### Medicine as a Profession Clerkships 23
MDR ### Medicine as a Profession Clerkships 32
Phase 3: Advanced
MDR ### Sub-Internship4
MDR ### Clinical Selective4
MDR ### Integrated Science Selective4
MDR ### Critical Care Selective2
MDR ### Transition to Residency2
MDR ### Specialty Boot Camp2
MDR ### Scholarly Concentration3
Total Credit Hours135

Plan of Study

Mission

The NextGenMD curriculum strives to empower learners to transform lives and inspire learners to serve the global community. The curriculum will produce transformational leaders who will shape the future of medicine, direct health systems, and champion discovery and its translation into clinical interventions.

Goals

The NextGenMD curriculum emphasizes:

  • Active, case-based, collaborative learning with early clinical experiences
  • Integration of basic sciences, clinical medicine, and health system sciences throughout all phases of the curriculum
  • Personalized areas of scholarly concentration including options for 4-year dual/joint degrees or an accelerated transition to residency after three full years of medical school
  • Opportunities to study social and cultural determinants of health in South Florida to address health disparities
  • Graduates of the program will demonstrate knowledge, skills, and attitudes/behaviors in four core domains: 1) Professionalism and Interpersonal Skills; 2) Health Systems Sciences; 3) Biomedical Knowledge and Clinical Care; and 4) Practice Based Learning 

Student Learning Outcomes

Students will demonstrate a mastery of biomedical knowledge (e.g. anatomy, biochemistry, immunology, etc) required to enter residency training through internal and external assessment methods including at 7 Milepost weeks throughout the curriculum.

Students will demonstrate a mastery of clinical skills through internal and external assessments methods including at 7 Milepost weeks throughout the curriculum.

Students will demonstrate application of knowledge and skills to clinical decision-making and the practice of medicine, including organizing clinical data, formulating differential diagnoses, synthesizing clinical information, and creating diagnostic and therapeutic plans.  There will be internal and external assessments methods including at 7 Milepost weeks throughout the curriculum.

Students will meet the following institutional educational objectives in four domains:

Professionalism and Interpersonal Skills

            Develop and maintain a professional identity

            Maintain emotional, physical, and mental health in pursuit of continual personal and professional growth

            Collaborate as a member of an interprofessional team (including patients and caregivers)

Health Systems Science

            Work as a leader in the health care delivery system

            Recognize and address social and environmental determinants of health for patients and populations

Biomedical Knowledge and Clinical Care

            Obtain, organize, and communicate clinical data

            Apply foundational science to analyze and prioritize clinical data

            Recommend management for core clinical experiences

Practice-Based Learning

            Construct, pursue, and revise an individualized learning plan

            Identify and investigate problems in the natural, social, and health systems sciences that influence patient health and well-being

            Form clinical questions and retrieve evidence to advance patient care