http://publichealth.med.miami.edu/

Dept. Code:  EPH

Degree Programs

  • Master of Public Health (MPH)
  • Master of Science in Public Health (MSPH)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Epidemiology (PhD)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Prevention Science and Community Health (PhD)

The Graduate Programs in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine are at the forefront of public health science with emphasis on research, education, and evidence-based public health service. The Graduate Programs promote an environment of learning and inquiry, stressing the scientific method as a way of generating knowledge about common pathways in health and illness. The mission of the Graduate Programs in Public Health is to develop leaders who can expand and translate knowledge into policy and practice to promote health and prevent disease in human populations.

Joint Degree Programs

Joint degree programs are also offered in conjunction with the School of Medicine (MD/MPH, MD/PhD), School of Law (JD/MPH), and the College of Arts and Sciences (MPA/MPH), (MAIA/MPH) and (MALAS/MPH).

Admission Requirements

  • Online Application applicants must submit their application online through SOPHAS, the centralized application service of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH)All application materials, including transcripts, test scores, personal statement, resume, and letters of recommendation, must be submitted online through SOPHAS.
  • Official transcripts from all previously attended colleges and universities. All foreign transcripts must be official and submitted in the original language. If the original language is not English, an official translation must be submitted along with the transcript. We do not accept evaluations from foreign credentialing service organizations. All non-US transcripts must be evaluated by the World Education Service (WES) using their ICAP Course-by-course evaluation service. Non-US transcripts are evaluated exclusively through WES. 
  • Official GRE test scores Applicants are required to submit GRE general exam scores taken within the last five years. Alternatively we accept the MCAT, LSAT, GMAT and DAT for the MPH/MSPH degree programs only. Applicants to the MPH/MSPH program who hold advanced degrees (MD, PhD, JD) are encouraged but not required to submit test scores.
  • TOEFL/IELTS International students whose native language is not English are required to submit TOEFL Or IELTS scores. 
  • Resume/Curriculum Vitae including employment, activities, community service, education, academic or professional honors.
  • Statement of purpose detailing your academic interest in our program as well as your future career goals. This statement should discuss any experience you have in public health including field experience, training, education, or other related qualifications. Discuss how earning this degree will contribute to your future and the future of public health.
  • Three letters of recommendation from people who are best able to assess your ability to be successful in a public health degree program. Ideally, your recommenders are recent professors, researchers, or employers in a related field. You will be asked for your recommenders’ contact information on the online application. They will be sent an online form to complete via email.

To obtain detailed program curricula on the MPH/MSPH, PhD in Epidemiology, and joint degree programs, please contact our offices at the address below or visit our website.

For further information, please contact:

Rick del Rosario, Director of Admissions
Graduate Programs Office
Department of Public Health Sciences
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (R-669)
P. O. Box 016069
Miami, Florida 33101
Tel: 305-243-7246
E-mail: publichealthadmissions@miami.edu
 

Doctoral Programs in Public Health

EPH 600. Introduction to Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This introductory course will provide students with the opportunity to explore and analyse contemporary public health issues and provide a history and a context that will allow students to better understand the field of public health, its core disciplines and their role as future public health professionals.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPH 601. Medical Biostatistics I. 4 Credit Hours.

Introduction to probability and statistics including descriptive statistics, tests of hypothesis, regression analysis, contingency tables, nonparametric tests, and life tables. Students gain hands-on experience in the analysis of medical data using several computer systems and at least one of the different statistical packages such as: BMDP, SAS, PSTAT, SYSTAT, and Minitab.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPH 602. Biostatistics II. 3 Credit Hours.

Continuation and elaboration of EPH601. Topics include design of factorial experiments, analysis of variance and variance components, multiple linear regression, and life tables.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 603. Applied Data Management and Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

The course is designed to introduce students to applied quantitative methods through both lecture-basaed and experimental strategies. Emphasis will be placed on data collection, data management, and conceptual use of various analytic techniques.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

EPH 604. Clinical Trials. 3 Credit Hours.

Planning, design, analysis, and data management for clinical therapeutic and prophylactic trials. Illustrations are provided through case examples.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

EPH 605. Graduate Pre Semester Writing Seminar. 1 Credit Hour.

This course serves as a foundation for incoming graduate students in the Department of Public Health Sciences to develop the written skills and proficiency necessary for graduate level writing. This mandatory online course is offered to students through an established partnership with the University of Miami Writing Center.
Components: DIL.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPH 606. Graduate Pre Semester Math. 1 Credit Hour.

This course serves as a foundation for incoming graduate students in the Department of Public Health Sciences to develop the skills and proficiency necessary for graduate level math. This mandatory online course will assess and strengthen students' analytical readiness to ensure successful comprehension of graduate level numerical elements present in all graduate public health courses.
Components: DIL.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPH 607. Public Health Scientific Communications. 3 Credit Hours.

The focus of this course is the development of written and oral presentation skills that will enable you to effectively communicate concepts and results to diverse scientific and public health audiences. Class time will largely be devoted to the development of these skills. You will also master tools that can be used to enhance these skills including bibliographic database searching, reference management software, presentation software, and graphics development tools. The course is also designed to allow you to fine-tune skills directed at broader public health audiences (e.g., policy briefs) or scientific audiences (submitting papers to journals for peer review) depending on your career interests. Students will also have the opportunity to become more comfortable and confident with writing and oral communications.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 608. MPH Professional Development. 3 Credit Hours.

This 3-credit seminar will be dedicated to providing students with opportunities to gain experiences with professional skills such as job interviewing, public speaking, preparing budgets, grant proposal writing, and working with community organizations. The course will be interactive, where I will talk about skills that are important in the public health workforce and students will then practice the skills in pairs or groups.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPH 609. Tobacco Control and Health: Consumption, Health Effects and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide students with an overview of the research in the field of tobacco control, enable students to have an understanding of the patterns, determinants, and consequences of tobacco use, as well as understand how public health policies have worked to reduce tobacco related morbidity and mortality.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 610. Public Health Surveillance Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to make students aware of all aspects that must be considered when designing or working with a Public Health Surveillance System (PHSS). The lectures will concentrate on the different types of PHSS, data base structures, practical design elements, data gathering strategies, quality control and evaluation considerations and the role of PHSS within the public health community. Additionally, students will be given the opportunity to utilize their analytical skills and demonstrate their mastery of statistical software packages by performing three preliminary analysis of a real PHSS data set.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 612. Global Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar examines current global public health issues, governance and decision-making challenges for the 21st Century across developing, transitioning, and developed countries. Topics of discussion include new actors for world health in the era of globalization; linking human development, poverty and health inequities; social, cultural and ethical considerations for health planning; role of industry, trade and public health; evidence based research for improved global health initiatives; foreign policy and health security challenges associated with emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases and public and private partnerships in global health. Open only to EPH majors.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 614. Global Outbreak. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar examines current global public health issues and provides an overview of global outbreak investigations and disease surveillance. Participating in epidemiological/outbreak investigations in international settings provides unique opportunities to learn about health challenges in different ecologic, cultural and resource limited settings. This seminar will also allow students to gather insight into public health surveillance and understand the utility of the ongoing systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of data for use in planning and evaluation of pubic health intervention programs.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPH 617. Introduction to Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce students to the science of prevention and health pro motion. More specifically, through didactic presentations, group discussions, article readings and critiques, and a term project, this course will focus on providing students with an overview of: the top preventable causes of disease in the U.S., the etiology of disease (with a focus on the top preventable causes of disease in the U.S.) across the lifespan, the role of prevention theories in the development of preventive interventions, and the role of methodology in prevention science. The course will also provide an overview of efficacious/effective preventive interventions, including (but not limited to): family community, and school level interventions. Examples from the fields of obesity, drug use, smoking, and HIV will be used to illustrate the course learning objectives detailed below.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 620. Health Education and Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Educational processes with special emphasis on the social and cultural determinants of health behavior, health education as a process of social change, and community based health education organizations. Open only to EPH majors.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 621. Fundamentals of Epidemiology. 3 Credit Hours.

Principles and methods of epidemiology. Descriptive epidemiology, environmental and other risk factors, detection of outbreaks, basic demography, and etiologic studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPH 622. Obesity And Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

Nearly two thirds of the United States is now considered overweight or obese and the associated medical costs are placing an unsustainable burden on our health care system. However, the issue of overweight/obesity extends beyond behavioral choices and medical costs. This course will take a deeper look at the complex interactions between our environment, behaviors, and policies, and how they jointly contribute to the obesity epidemic. This course will provide an interdisciplinary perspective of the biological, psychosocial, ecological, and economic determinants that contribute to obesity and the resulting pathways to chronic disease and disability. Finally, current evidence-based public health programs currently will be discussed to stimulate critical thinking necessary to implement effective obesity prevention and control programs.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 623. Determinants of Health and Health Disparities Across the Life Course. 3 Credit Hours.

This course builds on the concepts and methods examined in EPH 614, delving further into risk and protective processes related to health outcomes across the life course, from the prenatal period to older adulthood. Class readings and discussions will examine examples of common risk pathways contributing to various diseases, including pathways hypothesized to be related to health inequities and disparities, such as: economic and educational disadvantage, stress, sedentary behavior and poor behavioral regulation, social isolation. Common protective pathways that promote health are also reviewed, such as: positive parenting and family relations, and social support.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 625. Ethical Issues in Epidemiology. 3 Credit Hours.

The course identifies and analyzes ethical issues in epidemiologic practice and research. Issues include data acquisition and management, confidentiality, valid consent, advocacy, public policy, subgroup stigma, research sponsorship, conflicts of interest, communication of risk, and international and intercultural difference.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 626. Health Equity. 3 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to cover health disparities from multiple perspectives and levels of analysis. We know that the same ethnic, social, and cultural groups are characterized by disparities in many different health outcomes---including "voluntary" behaviors such as crime, violence, sexual risk taking, and substance abuse as well as " involuntary" outcomes such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease. These disparities are rooted in the same structure of how groups relate to each other, in the physical built environment, in the quality of education provided to children, and in access to quality health care. We will cover all of these (and other) determinants in this course .
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 631. Public Health Administration. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of the historical background, philosophy, and purpose of public health. Relationship between government, law, and public health. Organization, management, and intergovernmental relationships of public health agencies in the United States at the federal, state, and local level. Basic principles of management, decision making, and prioritizing in public health are discussed. Overview of programs and services provided by public health organizations with emphasis on current public health issues and problems are also included. Open only to EPH majors.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 632. US Health Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the multiple systems that define, describe, and shape the delivery of health care in the United States. Using case studies and presentations of major issues, this course will give the learner an appreciation of the dilemma confronting policy makers, providers, and patients: how to balance cost, quality, and access.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 639. Ecology and Control of Vector-Borne Diseases. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will provide students with an overview of the epidemiology of major vector-borne diseases in the U.S. (e.g., Lyme Disease, West Nile Virus) and globally (e.g., malaria, dengue, filariasis, leishmaniasis, and other arboviruses), field and lab-based methodologies for vector studies to incriminate vector species and assess transmission dynamics, vector and disease surveillance, and "cutting-edge" vector control technology. A major focus will be on the ecology of vectors in their local environments and how transmission dynamics are affected by changes in land use, urbanization, and climate. Students will learn about new WHO-approved strategies for integrated Vector Management (IVM) and how they are applicable for the prevention and control of all vector-borne diseases.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 640. Urban Environment and Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

Where we live, where we work, where we go, and how we get there may all impact our behaviors and ultimately our health and well-being. This course examines the urban environment - in particular, those aspects of urban/suburban/semi-rural environments created by humans. This includes how homes, neighborhoods, cities and regions impact public health challenges such as obesity, chronic disease, mental health, infectious disease, and injuries. This course will teach students to translate scientific findings to design healthy communities, and develop interventions to promote urban health. Students will learn how to map neighborhood characteristics such as food outlets, parks and walkability, and to develop recommendations for policymakers.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 641. Integrated Aspects of Environmental Health. 3 Credit Hours.

Interdisciplinary scope of environmental health problems. Development of a practical, dynamic model for integrating fundamental concepts from a variety of environmental disciplines. Open only to EPH majors.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 642. Oceans and Human Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with introductory knowledge of the broad and rela tively young field of Oceans and Human Health. The focus is the present, futur e, and potential effects of oceanic processes and marine organisms on human hea lth and wellbeing. These diverse factors reflect the physical, chemical, bioti c and social processes which require an integration of information and knowledg e from the medical, marine, and social sciences. Of growing concern in this rap idly-developing area of study is the human health effects from exposure to subs tances that occur widely in marine ecosystems including synthetic organic chemi cals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAs), metals (both introduced and anth ropogenic), marine toxins, and pathogens.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 643. Introduction to Occupational Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a general introduction to major concepts and issues in occupational health and safety from local to global, addressing fundamental topics and current controversies. The course covers core topics that prepare students to more fully understand and address occupational health issues: toxicology, exposure assessment, occupational epidemiology, risk assessment/risk management, prevention of workplace injury and disease, health promotion of adults and protection of worker populations from environmental hazards.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

EPH 644. Fundamentals of Program Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours.

Fundamentals of Program Evaluation was developed as a survey course directed specifically at providing an overview of the broad area of program evaluation. At its base, program evaluation is the investigator of a program's characteristics and merits. In context of health care, the purpose of program evaluation is to provide information in the effectivness of programs or interventions so as to optimize the outcomes, efficiency and quality of health care. Evaluation of a program is an essential part of the successful implementation and conduct of any health care project or intervention, and should ideally be designed along with the project itself. Program evaluation activities can use a wide range of methodologies (e.g., qualitative, quantitative), analyze different aspects of a program (e.g., structure, activities, organization), and have a large number of intended outcomes (e.g, achivement or program's goals objectives, extent of program impact, program cost).
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 645. Behavioral Epidemiology. 3 Credit Hours.

A sub-discipline of epidemiology with a principal focus on lifestyle behaviors that are health-enhancing or health-compromising. With a focus on health behavior rather than disease endpoints, behavioral epidemiology has a primary prevention orientation. This course explores epidemiologic approaches to description/intervention upon dietary behaviors, exercise, substance use behaviors (cigarettes, alcohol, illicit drugs), and sexual behaviors.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 647. Community-based Participatory Research. 3 Credit Hours.

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is methodology, increasingly popu lar in public health and other disciplines, which invites community collaborati on throughout the research process from conceptualization of study focus to dis semination of findings. This course will provide an opportunity for medical and graduate students to better understand the process by which community members and academic researchers work collectively to address health disparities and in fluence social change.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 649. Survey Methods: Planning and Conducting Health Surveys. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this class is to introduce students to theories, principles, methods, and best practices of survey design, measurement, and sampling as applied to health surveys. Students develop an understanding of the survey research process including problem definition, strengths and limitations of survey research, survey design, survey sampling techniques, data entry and management, data analysis, and proper reporting of results.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 650. Health Economics for Evaluation and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course centers on a discussion of the criteria used to evaluate the allocation of resources and analyze the behavior of two of the principal actors-consumers and firms. The principles of microeconomics are presented in the context of health care systems and markets. Numerous real-world issues and case studies are used to demonstrate economic decision-making techniques, especially for health care organizations and consumers.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 651. Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Purpose of the course is to provide students with a sound understanding of the fundamental concepts and methods for conducting public health research. After a brief introduction to the philosophy of science, the major emphasis in the early portion of the course is on research conceptualization, design and measurement, with a particular focus on the logic of minimizing rival alternative explanations of finding for experimental and quasi-experimental studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPH 652. Health Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Part I will examine seven models encompassing different perspectives on public health: philosophy, political theory and politics, law, economic, science and information culture and religion, and organization and management, including how they relate and their relevance in formulating, implementing, and evaluating public policy. Part II will examine the policy making process including how issues reach the government agenda, how laws are formulated, and how the process affects substance. Part III describes the core elements of policy analysis including: problem definition; background; political, economic, and social landscape; development of policy options; and recommendation. It will also include discussions of how to find and analyze documents and data as well as discuss the financing of health care.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 653. Leading Changes In Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This new transition course at the end of the second year will prepare students for their more advanced experiences in community and public health in the third and fourth years. The objective of this course is to provide students with an opportunity develop essential skills in leading change in public health while linking their academic work in epidemiology and public health for real world application in public health practice. Students will receive didactic presentations on topics such as leading change, interest based negotiation, and leading from the middle as well as lectures on the health disparities and the social determinants of health. These lectures will be integrated with interactive discussions and hands-on small group exercises to explore how practitioners can translate public health and community knowledge into sustainable solutions. Leading Change in Public Health Moving From Talk to Action will provide students with 21st century leadership skills that prepare them to tackle public health issues in our society from the most simple to very complex. Participants will be challenged to think differently on many levels and prepare them to be agents of change for future generations.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

EPH 654. Ethics And Law In Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on key concepts of law and ethics, economics and epidemiology, and policy analysis, as applied to public health; and it seeks to demonstrate with both current and historical examples how theses perspectives empower and constrain public health decision-making and actions. The organizing framework is legal structure, but approached from the perspective that a society's established laws are the clearest exemplars of societal notions of ethics.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 655. Health Economics and Financing. 3 Credit Hours.

Health economics studies economic principles, methods of decision making, and the allocation of resources within health care systems and markets. This course will provide students with an understanding of the flow of funds and services throughout the U.S. health care system and how the structure and financing of health care impacts population health status. We will use numerous real-world issues and case studies to demonstrate economic decision-making techniques, especially for health care organizations and consumers (patients, providers). Students are not expected to have familiarity with economic concepts and principles prior to taking this course. In addition, students are not expected to use calculus in this course. However, students are expected to have an understanding of basic algebra, and graphical analysis will be used often throughout the class.
Requisite: MD/MPH Four Year/Regional Med Camp.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 660. Public Health Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

The Public Health Seminar is designed to explore contemporary issues, problems, and controversies in public health through an interdisciplinary perspective. Upon the completion of the course students will be able to: 1) understand key public health problems, their distribution, and prevention strategies, 2) examine the complex tapestry of social, economic, political, and environmental factors that affect public health outcomes, 3) understand the complexities inherent in improving health locally and on a global scale, 4) examine the major determinants of, and responses to, poverty and health, 5) analyze public health disparities through a social justice perspective, 6) understand and analyze the roles and agendas of major stakeholders in local, state, national, and global public health, 7) understand the link between global and local health issues, 8) discuss selected interdisciplinary, cross-cutting issues in public health, 9) explain the interrelationships among the five core areas of public health. This course is only open to MD/MPH students.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 661. Public Health Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides a dynamic, interactive approach to public health designed to prepare students in basic policy, epidemiology, and health education related to nutrition. Recognizing the multiple social, cultural, environmental, and physiological factors leading to nutritional disease. The course includes experts from a variety of disciplines. Public health nutrition addresses issues germane to the public's health by elucidating their extent, determinants and consequences, and the policies and programs to address them. Open only to EPH majors.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 662. Child Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will focus on U.S. federal child policy. This course has been designed to provide a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary (e.g., public health, public policy and social work), and cross-sector perspective (e.g., government, private and philanthropic sectors) on child and family policies. Sessions will cover varying approaches and include presentations from a wide range of experts.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 671. Maternal and Child Health. 3 Credit Hours.

Preventative and therapeutic concepts pertinent to the reduction of morbidity and mortality among mothers and their children.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 680. Practical Field Experience. 3 Credit Hours.

Practical field experience requirement for MPH students. Students are placed in health-related settings (local, national, and international) to work on projects of mutual interest to both the field organization and the student.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPH 681. Capstone Experience Project. 3 Credit Hours.

The capstone project is intended to build upon EPH 680 field work and will provide students with an opportunity to apply public health academic theory and acquired skills to community health problems.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPH 684. Special Topics. 3.00 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to allow the listing of special topics withing the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health and cross-list topics with other departments' offerings.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPH 698. MSPH Thesis Proposal. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an independent study course. Students in the MSPH track may register for this course with an approval from the Capstone Manager and the Faculty Advisor. The purpose of this course is to develop the MSPH Thesis Proposal, form a thesis committee with at least two members: 1st reader (an expert in the field) and 2nd reader (the faculty advisor) and obtain proposal approval from the committee members. This MHPS Thesis Proposal is required and must be approved prior to start data collection and analysis.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.

EPH 699. Public Health Projects. 1-6 Credit Hours.

Research and/or design projects. Individual investigation of current public health problems. Required of all MPH students.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPH 700. Professional Development Seminar. 1 Credit Hour.

This course covers fundamental topic areas in professional development for PhD students in the public health sciences. Topic areas include: presenting research at conferences, writing manuscripts for publication, preparing the dissertation, the PhD comprehensive exams, effective teaching and mentoring, and getting a job in academia. Through interactive workshops, in-class exercises, brief presentations and assignments, students will have an opportunity to practice and strengthen necessary skills, including effective communication (oral and written), conflict resolution, and developing collaborations.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

EPH 702. Public Health Scientific Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

The focus of this course is the development of written and oral presentation skills that will enable you to effectively communicate concepts and results to diverse scientific and public health audiences. Class time will largely be devoted to the development of these skills. You will also master tools that can be used to enhance these skills including bibliographic database searching, reference management software, presentation software, and graphic development tools. The course is also designed to allow you to fine-tune skills directed at broader public health audiences or scientific audiences depending on your career interests. Students will also have the opportunity to become more comfortable and confident with writing and oral communications. Because public health is a collaborative endeavor students will also work collectively to support the development of these skills.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 703. Statistical Methods in Epidemiology. 4 Credit Hours.

Advanced statistical methods used in analyzing data from epidemiologic investigations. Topics include Mantel-Haenszel chi-square, interaction, standardization of rates, incidence density, logistics regression, and other special topics.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 705. Statistical Methods in Epidemiology II. 3 Credit Hours.

Continuation and elaboration of EPH 703. Advanced statistical methods used in analyzing data from epidemiologic investigations. Topics include Kappa statistics, life tables, survival analyses, logistic regression, Poisson regression, log linear models, clusters, meta-analysis, and other special topics.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 711. Cancer Epidemiology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the basic epidemiology of cancer. Major sites and exposures are stressed, highlighting descriptive, etiologic and preventive aspects. A major course project and one final exam are included.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 717. Integrating Behavior Health Theories and Models. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for synthesis and integration of knowledge regarding the phenomenon of health behavior. The focus is on critical examination of theoretical and empirical work in the area of health behavior from a public health perspective.
Prerequisites: EPH 617 or EPH 620. Or Requisite: Permission of Instructor.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 720. Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention. 3 Credit Hours.

Course aims to teach and train MPH students in the epidemiology and prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases which are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among the adult U.S. population. Essential knowledge for those working in the area of public health is emphasized.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 721. Chronic Disease Epidemiology. 3 Credit Hours.

The major chronic diseases (e.g. Heart Disease, Cancer, diabetes) their population impact and methods of prevention. Specialized problems associated with chronic disease studies are also included.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 722. Common Pathways: Infectious Diseases. 3 Credit Hours.

This course emphasizes surveillance, investigation, control and global health problems related to infectious diseases. Emphasis will be on the biology of infectious disease systems, development of study designs, epidemiological and biostatistical methods, and the employment of epidemiological methods for addressing major public health issues in international research.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 723. Epidemiology and Public Health Aspects of Diabetes Mellitus. 3 Credit Hours.

This course presents an overview of the epidemiology and public health impact of an important chronic disease, diabetes mellitus (DM). Topics include the classification and descriptive epidemiology of DM and associated health complications, disease screening, evaluation of risk factors, methodological issues associated with DM research, DM among special populations, and the public health impact of DM in the U.S.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 728. Social Epidemiology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview and understanding of key concepts and theoretical frameworks relevant to the study of social determinants of population health and health disparities. The interdisciplinary course will cover methodological considerations and methods relevant to the field of social epidemiology, such as lifecourse epidemiology and multilevel determinants of health. A major emphasis will be on biological pathways by which social factors “”•–—˜get under the skin”•–—˜, and the role of social policies in improving population health. The course will involve lectures, presentation of epidemiologic research by faculty researchers, class discussions, and class projects.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 730. Drug Abuse Epidemiology. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to educate students how to design, implement, and conduct studies of drug abuse epidemiology and its related scientific disciplines.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 731. Developing, Adapting and Evaluating Interventions. 3 Credit Hours.

This course builds on the substantive and methodological competencies acquired inpreceding prevention science courses by preparing students to develop and adaptpreventive interventions.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 732. Introduction to Dissemination and Implementation Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of Dissemination and Implementation (D&I) Sciences. Topics include the importance and language of D&I science; designs, methods and measures; differences and similarities across clinical, public health, and policy settings; selected tools for D&I research and practice; and future issues. The focus of this course will be on implementing prevention programs, strategies.and policies that are ready for application, testing and scale up, rather than developing interventions from scratch.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 740. Basic Pathology and Patho-physiology. 3 Credit Hours.

The course emphasizes basic patho-physiological mechanisms and diseases of particular interest to students of public health. Students obtain an understanding of basic pathological processes, nomenclature of pathological findings, and common natural and unnatural diseases affecting various body systems. Observations of autopsies and the gross pathology of selected organs are also incorporated in the course.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 751. Survival Analysis in Clinical Trials. 3 Credit Hours.

Statistical methods for analysis and interpretation of survival data arising from clinical trials. Topics include survival curves, estimation of sample size, survival curves, proportional-hazard models, time dependent variables, and prognostic indices.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 752. Advanced Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a survey course in advanced quantitative methods for research and evaluation in prevention science. The course will provide students with an introduction to research methodology, matching research questions to specific methods, applying methods to real world data, and presenting the application of a method to a broader audience.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 774. Advanced Epidemiologic Methods I. 3 Credit Hours.

This is the first course of a two part course in advanced epidemiologic methods. The fundamental principles, and methods of epidemiologic study designs, practical issues in the design, conduct of epidemiologic studies, and interpretation of research findings will be discusses. Emphasis will also be set on the application of epidemiologic methods in the form of journal article critique and a research design project.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

EPH 776. Advanced Epidemiological Methods II. 3 Credit Hours.

This is the second course of a 2-part course in advance epidemiologic methods. The fundamental concepts, principles, and methods of epidemiologic study designs will be presented at an advanced level. In addition, the practical issues in the design, conduct and analysis of epidemiologic studies and interpretation of research findings will be discussed. The emphasis will also include on application of the epidemiologic methods in the forms of journal article critique and research proposal development. The goal of this course is to present the advanced epidemiologic methods and their theoretical backgrounds to PhD students in fulfilling part of the PhD in Epidemiology degree.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Spring.

EPH 782. Advanced Individual Study. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Individual work on a special project under faculty guidance.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPH 825. Continuous Registration--Master's Study. 1 Credit Hour.

To establish residence for MPH students who are preparing for project presentation. Credit not granted. Regarded as full time residence.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPH 830. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Required of all candidates for the PhD. The student will enroll for credit as determined by his/her advisor but not for less than a total of 24. Not more than 12 hours of EPH830 may be taken in a regular semester, nor more than six in a summer session.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPH 840. Doctoral Dissertation- Post Candidacy. 1-12 Credit Hours.


Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

EPH 850. Research in Residence. 1 Credit Hour.

Used to establish research in residence for the Ph.D., after the student has been enrolled for the permissible cumulative total in appropriate doctoral research. Credit not granted. May be regarded as full-time residence as determined by the Dean of the Graduate School.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.