http://www.bus.miami.edu

Departments

  • Accounting
  • Business Law
  • Business Technology
  • Economics
  • Finance
  • Health Sector Management and Policy
  • Management
  • Management Science
  • Marketing

Research Institutes

Institute for the Study of Quality in Manufacturing and Service

The University of Miami Institute for the Study of Quality in Manufacturing and Service (UMISQ) exists to advance the theory and practice of Quality Science. Its mission is to promote the improvement and innovation of quality on local, national, and international levels through the acquisition, dissemination, and application of knowledge in the areas of science, technology, and management as related to Quality Science in general, and Lean Six Sigma Management specifically.

Objectives

  1. To conduct research in Quality Science and to publish its results through appropriate professional and academic outlets.
  2. To educate and train management, labor, UM students, and others in the theories and practices of Quality Science in general, and Lean Six Sigma Management specifically.
  3. To create internships for M.B.A. students in which they can solve real world problems using Quality Science theory and practice in general, and Lean Six Sigma management theory and practice in particular.
  4. To provide a vehicle for Lean Six Sigma certifications.

The Institute pursues its objectives through involvement of faculty, students, and client organizations in all sectors of the economy.

Intelligent Computer Systems Research Institute

The Intelligent Computer Systems Research Institute is a center for research and information dissemination within the field of information business technology. The institute focuses on multi-disciplinary topics such as Big Data, Analytics, Cloud Computing, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Agent technology, ‘The Internet of Things’, Health and Legal Informatics, Business Intelligence, and embedded systems.

Objectives

  1. To encourage partnerships between academia and industry. Corporate partners can provide data, field studies, test environments, and other resources through which leading theoretical work can be developed tested in an applied environment.
  2. To conduct research for publication in leading academic and industry related journals, as well as working papers.
  3. To encourage industry partners to work with students through the creation of internship positions. These internships provide students the opportunity to act as a link between the teaching and research of the institute’s members and the field based applied environment.

The Graduate Business Student Association

The Graduate Business Student Association (GBSA) is a professional and social student-run organization. All graduate business students become members once enrolled in a business master’s or doctoral program and are encouraged to attend meetings and events. The GBSA organizes activities and events aimed at strengthening networking within the graduate business student body and the business community while enriching the academic and social experiences of its members. The GBSA is governed by a committee that consists of a president, vice president, treasurer, secretary, marketing director, community service director, networking director, and a wellness and athletics director. In addition, cohort representatives are elected per program to serve as a liaison between their respective cohort and the committee.

Financial Assistance

Graduate Business Scholarships and Fellowships

There are a limited number of merit-based graduate business scholarships which are awarded at the time of admission to qualified full-time MBA students entering in the fall semester only. A graduate business scholarship covers a portion of tuition for the MBA degree. Graduate business scholarships are not automatically renewed.

In addition to graduate business scholarships, there are a limited number of Emery Means Findley, Jr. Fellowships and scholarships which are awarded by Graduate Business Programs to applicants with outstanding academic credentials. Any applicant who wishes to be considered for a graduate business scholarship or a fellowship, must indicate this in the space provided on the application. Awards are available to both domestic and international students.

There may be a limited number of merit/need-based scholarships which are awarded following admission to Professional and Executive programs. Details on how to apply for these scholarships are provided at the time of admission.

Donor Scholarships

Several endowed scholarships are made available to incoming graduate business students through the generosity of alumni and friends of the University of Miami School of Business Administration. These donor scholarships are for the purpose of recruiting students of high academic merit. The total number and amount of scholarship awards vary from year to year.

Scholarships will be awarded based on the recommendations of the Faculty Admissions Committee on a first come, first served basis. Since the number of scholarships is limited, students who meet the minimum criteria are not guaranteed a donor scholarship award.

We regret that a student may be ineligible for financial awards if he/she receives tuition benefits from the University of Miami or accepts any assistantship, scholarship, grant or fellowship from the University of Miami, in addition to our offer. This includes employees, their spouses, and dependents.

BANK OF AMERICA - ENDOWED BUSINESS SCHOLARSHIPS1
Criteria: A graduate business school student based on a combination of scholarship and financial need, who will preferably specialize in Finance, Accounting, or Management.

JACK R. BORSTING - GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT
Criteria: Outstanding candidate for a master’s level business degree.

RYDER/PATRICK J. CESARANO – ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP1
Criteria: MBA student with a concentration in finance or management science/operations research. Based on academic excellence and financial need.

PAT & LON WORTH CROW - SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT1
Criteria: Graduate business student specializing in Finance, who possesses several years of work experience, preferably with an expressed interest in a career in banking or a banking-related field. U.S. citizen, preferably resident in South Florida community.

EMERY MEANS FINDLEY, JR. – ENDOWED GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS IN BUSINESS
Criteria: Outstanding candidates for Graduate Business Programs.

DEAN M. FOGEL BUSINESS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP
Criteria:  Graduate business student with financial need and priority is for a United States veteran.

ALBERT AND ESTHER GREEN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP
Criteria:  Graduate business student with a health challenge, or student studying or working in Health Administration.  

ALLAN M. HERBERT & PATRICIA M. HERBERT – ENDOWED GRADUATE BUSINESS SCHOLARSHIP1
Criteria: Outstanding graduate business student, well-rounded, willing to finance his/her own education, and who appreciates the value of work and strives to combine study, work and extra-curricular activities.

JAMES W. McLAMORE – GRADUATE BUSINESS FELLOWSHIPS
Criteria: To recruit and retain outstanding graduate business students.

E. BRUCE MCLAUGHLIN & CYNTHIA M. SWOL - ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP IN MARKETING1
Criteria: Graduate business student with concentration in Marketing, who has significant work experience prior to entering the MBA program. U. S. citizen, with preference given to female students with unmet financial need.

MERRILL LYNCH & CO. FOUNDATION, INC. – FELLOWSHIPS IN INTERNATIONAL FINANCE
Criteria: Graduate business student preparing for a career in International Finance.

CHARLES & ROSE NATIELLO AND THOMAS A. NATIELLO, JR. BUSINESS SCHOLARSHIP
Criteria: Full-time Graduate Business student who has completed one year and is enrolled in a two-year program with a 3.5 GPA or higher. 

PIECHOSKI FAMILY GRADUATE BUSINESS FELLOWSHIP
Criteria: Outstanding graduate business student. 

SOUTHEAST BANKING CORPORATION FOUNDATION – ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS1
Criteria: Graduate student in the MBA program who is a Florida resident. Based on academic excellence and financial need.

SOUVIRON FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP - Annual MBA Scholarship
Criteria: The annual scholarship is for a MBA student with financial need with a preference for an Eagle Scout, if someone meets that criteria.  If not, a qualified MBA student with need.

1

Essay Required: In 300 words or less, please explain why you need financial assistance to complete your MBA degree. The essay must be included with your application. 

Various other donor scholarships are available based upon need, merit, or other specified criteria.

Ziff Graduate Career Services Center

The Ziff Graduate Career Service Center’s mission is to provide the most current quality resources, career counseling, advising and coaching services that support all University of Miami School of Business Administration Graduate program participants, alumni staff, faculty and others who seek career guidance and coaching.  The Ziff Graduate Career Services Center continues to build, foster and maintain strong vibrant partnerships and corporate relationships in both the South Florida community and nationwide, which in turn exposes and engages students along their chosen career paths.

The Ziff Career Services Team is committed to providing each student with a personalized plan and the resources and skills needed to be competitive in the global business environment.  Developing graduates who will become principled leaders with innovative ideas in a more global society, is the most important challenge that the Ziff Team seeks to navigate for students.

This Ziff Career Services Team is the students’ premier frontline resource to assist in the development of an effective career strategy and the personal branding activities and initiatives that will prepare them for a successful job search at all levels of their career.  The personal branding effort includes a strategic resume, honing of interview skills through practice and mock interviews with selected employers and staff, networking opportunities and practices, understanding the generation and maintenance of contacts, and the preparation for a successful career transition.  Highlighting leadership, organization and continuous career management, while developing and enhancing an array of skill sets, is central to the mission of the Ziff Graduate Career Services Center.

The Ziff Graduate Career Services Center is located in the School of Business Administration complex on the first floor of the Jenkins Building.

On Campus Corporate Recruiting and Interviews

The UM-SBA recruiting initiatives begin in the Fall semester from mid-September through mid-December and continues in the Spring semester from mid-January through May. The Ziff Graduate Career Services Center provides ongoing events from Information Sessions to Workshops to Guest Speaker Events to Alumni Engagement to On-Campus Recruiters, all in an effort to expose students to HR professionals, company executives and real-world executives who contribute their time to present a variety of potential career pathways for graduates.

Mock Interviews are scheduled during the same Fall and Spring time frames, to ensure employers are available for students to gain experience with their interviewing skills. A mock interview is a simulation of a job interview which is a conversational exercise that resembles a real interview to the extent possible and practical, for the purpose of providing experience for candidates in a non-threatening scenario.

Networking Strategies, Approaches and Practices

Students are encouraged to join the School of Business Administration MBA groups via LinkedIn, Facebook and other social media outlets as an engaging way to reach out to contacts, companies, classmates, faculty and employers to build their own unique network. The ZIFF/SYMPLICITY website provides students with notices, agendas and listings and itineraries for seminars and work sessions key to the MBA majors.

The University of Miami Alumni Association allows students to register and create an account to access alumni throughout the United States and the larger global communities. 

The Ziff Graduate Career Services Center also provides networking opportunities through on campus career fairs, guest speaker series and events that encourage students to engage employers, recruiters and other working professionals in a variety of disciplines, sectors of business, and industry.  Additionally, the ZIFF/SYMPLICITY website provides access to UM-SBA MBA graduates who are available as a resource for students.

Internship Opportunities and Experience

The School of Business Administration encourages students to augment their classroom experience and curriculum through participation in an internship in summer or during Spring and Fall semesters if students can accommodate these with their schedule. The Ziff Graduate Career Services Center recruits a variety of employers to provide unique and targeted internship opportunities for students, all sourced on the ZIFF/SYMPLICITY website.

An internship assignment is a key positioning element for the post-MBA candidate’s career. The internship search is the graduate student’s main focus at the beginning of their enrollment in their specific MBA program.  The Ziff Graduate Career Services Center works with all graduate students to target their specific career choices and optimize the type of resources necessary and appropriate to improve the student’s fit for employers.

Registration for Ziff

UM-SBA graduate business students who are seeking employment opportunities post-graduation are required to register with the Ziff Graduate Career Services Center to establish an individual account that includes personal and academic profiles as well as career goals and objectives in order to access job postings, workshops, events, counseling, interviewing and more,  on the Ziff website

Ziff Graduate Career Services Center utilizes a software application that allows students to download an app to access all of the calendar services and resources on their smart phones or tablets. Students receive alerts about upcoming events, activities, resources for job searches, and other career-related opportunities and initiatives.  In addition, student Facebook and LinkedIn accounts are synched to this application.

The registration process begins with the Pre-Onboarding Protocols as students are required to complete practical assignments prior to their SBA Orientation.

Online Resources

The Center’s online portal is where students can access through smart phone applications, career resources, job postings, tools for conducting employment searches, networking activities, informational sessions, career fairs, national conferences, professional networking and corporate presentations as they are promoted on the student’s calendars.  Updated and new employment search engines and the latest web-based tools are available for students to search types of companies/businesses and jobs, including compensation packages, qualifications, career ladders and  the competition for positions on a national or global basis.

Student Responsibilities

Ultimately, success in obtaining a job is defined by the student based on their individual set of circumstances, major, geographic preference and type of industry or business as well as their short and long term goals and objectives. Along with the Ziff Graduate Career Services Center as a partner, students can create a successful personal branding effort that will connect a network of contacts that will lead to interviews and job offers.  Participation in on-campus recruiting activities, MBA Club activities, participation in MBA career fairs, relevant workshops and other SBA-sponsored events is encouraged to broaden students’ exposure to individuals and environments that can assist them in their personal branding efforts.

Students are required to meet with a Ziff Graduate Career Services Center career adviser in their first term as an MBA to discuss their career goals and to develop a personalized Career Action Plan that will lay out a strategy and time frame for their goals.  This Career Action Plan and the ongoing strategies will be built through numerous advising/coaching sessions, workshops and participation in both SBA and external events or initiatives.

Please note, Ziff Graduate Career Services Center supports career outcome, however, it is the students’ personal commitment that truly leads to employment.

Students will be required to maintain a current Ziff Graduate Career Services Center profile, resume and goals for their selected career pathways. Students must complete an exit survey after graduation to report their employment information.

The Mentor Program

  1. The School of Business Mentor Program is designed to enhance the classroom experience by matching students with local professionals who have experience and expertise in the students’ area of career interest, or are versed in areas of professional development.
  2. Through personal interaction with experienced business professionals, students gain an understanding of corporate culture, career directions, and networking. Students also have the opportunity to interact with other mentors by attending regularly scheduled roundtables, hosted by the School.
  3. Graduate business students are encouraged to participate.
  4. Applications are available on our website

ACC 600. Accounting for Decision-Making and Control. 3 Credit Hours.

The course focuses on the use and understanding of basic financial and manageri al accounting reports. The course is oriented to the user of financial data rat her than the preparer of the data. Coverage of basic accounting assumptions and current issues affecting accounting processes and reporting are included, but detailed accounting procedures are not emphasized. Completion of the course should permit students to understand accounting information and to communicate with professional accountants. Does not satisfy any accounting requirements needed to sit for the CPA exam in Florida.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ACC 601. Trends in Present Day Accounting. 2 Credit Hours.

Recent developments in accounting thought and advanced accounting theory. The analysis of trends as disclosed by recent releases of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and the Financial Accounting Standards Board are discussed. Other topics include terminology, current trends in the measurement, presentation of third financial data to meet the needs of third parties, and surveys accounting literature.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ACC 602. Analysis of Financial Statements. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Course emphasizes the fundamental techniques of financial statement analysis. Building upon core accounting and investment concepts, the course covers the analysis (including ratio analysis) and interpretation of financial accounting information including the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. The course also examines the use of accounting information in investment and credit decisions.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ACC 603. Studies in Financial Reporting Issues. 2 Credit Hours.

An exploration of complex financial reporting issues using the case method.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ACC 604. Seminar in Cost Accounting. 2 Credit Hours.

Course covers four major segments. First, it reviews the basic concepts and too ls associated with management control systems. Second, it underscores the importance of decentralization and the impact it has on decision making. Third, it examines the strategic place for cost management. Examples include the adoption of the balanced score card, quality control, productivity, and environmental cost management. Fourth, the course brings costing and control tools into the discussion of decision making.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 606. Internal Auditing. 2 Credit Hours.

Course explores the unique issues associated with the internal audit function. Additionally, the ethical code applicable to internal auditors is discussed.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ACC 607. Financial Accounting & Reporting. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic concepts of accounting designed to increase understanding of the function of accounting statements and their limitations. The generally accepted principles governing the preparation of financial reports and the use of accounting information in investment and credit decisions. Does not satisfy any accounting requirement needed to sit for the CPA Exam in Florida. Limited to Executive MBA students only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring & Summer.

ACC 608. Managerial Accounting. 3 Credit Hours.

Current managerial accounting techniques and theories. Topics include the use of accounting data in making decisions and planning and control systems for implementation of decisions. Does not satisfy any accounting requirements needed to sit for the CPA Exam in Florida. Limited to Executive MBA students only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ACC 610. Financial Reporting Research. 2 Credit Hours.

The objective of the course is to familiarize students with researching financial information of publicly traded companies and to provide an introduction to accounting research related to the content and presentation in SEC filings. The course will emphasize searching and accessing as well as understanding and interpretation of financial information presented in SEC filings (e.g., 10-K, 10-Q, Proxy Statements). Accounting topics covered will include accounting information and the capital markets, earnings management, earnings quality, effect of recognition vs. disclosure in accounting reports and the role of the SEC in regulating financial reporting.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 611. Auditing Seminar. 2 Credit Hours.

Practical applications of auditing and research into audit matters. Emphasis of the course is placed on cases involving audit failures, appropriate auditing procedures, reporting, and exercise of audit judgment.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 616. CPA Review I. 3 Credit Hours.

The CPA Review is an essential ingredient of the accounting accelerated accounting track. Students must provide proof of satisfactory completion of an approved course of study for two parts of the CPA exam (Regulation and Financial Accounting and Reporting). This course cannot be used to meet the State of Florida's educational requirements for taking the CPA exam.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ACC 617. CPA Review II. 3 Credit Hours.

The CPA Review is an essential ingredient of the accounting accelerated accounting track. Students must provide proof of satisfactory completion of an approved course of study for two parts of the CPA Exam (Business Environment and Concepts, and Auditing and Attestation). This course cannot be used to meet the State of Florida's educational requirements for taking the CPA exam.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ACC 620. Accounting Controls in Information Technology. 2 Credit Hours.

Course develops students' understanding of the theory and practice of relational database management systems in the accounting view of enterprise-wide databases. With a focus on controls, students build accounting systems elements related to main accounting transaction cycles, the revenue cycle, and the purchase cycle.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ACC 622. Advanced Issues in Auditing. 3 Credit Hours.

Course covers advanced issues which arise in audit practice including audit reporting issues, fraud detection and reporting, attestation engagements, special reporting issues, compilation and review engagements, scope of services issues, and other new issues which have a significant impact in audit practice. Not open to students with credit in ACC 522.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 623. International Accounting and Taxation. 2 Credit Hours.

Course covers tax accounting and business considerations in the global business environment. U.S. tax issues involved in international transactions, working across national borders, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, money laundering and uses of accounting information in managing an international business. Not open to students with credit for ACC 523.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Summer.

ACC 624. Accounting for Governmental and Not-for-Profit Entities. 2 Credit Hours.

The course introduces accounting within the environment of modern government and not-for-profit organizations. Emphasis is placed on financial accounting and reporting, current accounting issues, and managerial activities. Not open to students with credit for ACC 524.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ACC 630. International Financial Reporting Standards. 1 Credit Hour.

This course provides an overview of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The course will begin with a study of IFRS Framework and will then examine a number of the major topics covered in the Intermediate Accounting courses. The perspective will be a comparison between IFRS and U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (U.S. GAAP).
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ACC 631. Advanced Financial Accounting Topics. 2 Credit Hours.

Coverage of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles governing business combinations, the preparation of consolidated financial statement including local and foreign subsidiaries, and other financial reporting topics.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 632. Intermediate Accounting I. 2 Credit Hours.

The accounting principles which shape the financial reporting practices followed by entities that prepare financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles are discussed. Course also includes the determination of income components and balance sheet elements with brief coverage of the statement of cash flows. Does not count towards the credits needed to graduate.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ACC 633. Intermediate Accounting II. 2 Credit Hours.

The accounting principles which shape the financial reporting practices followed by entities that prepare financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles are discussed. Course also includes the determination of income components and balance sheet elements with brief coverage of the statement of cash flows. Does not count towards the credits needed to graduate.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ACC 634. Cost Accounting. 2 Credit Hours.

Topics include basic cost concepts, product costing techniques including job-order and process costing, in-depth studies of techniques and issues surrounding cost allocation methods, basic approaches to solving complex accounting problems, standard cost systems and variance analysis, and variable costing. Additionally, activity-based costing concepts and methodology are introduced. This course does not count towards the credits needed to graduate.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ACC 635. Auditing. 2 Credit Hours.

Course provides an introduction to the field of auditing. It concentrates on conducting an audit of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards. Course covers accounting information systems, audit planning, audit risk and materiality assessments, evaluation of internal control, audit evidence, documentation, and audit reports. This course does not count towards the credits needed to graduate.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ACC 636. Accounting Systems. 2 Credit Hours.

Contemporary accounting systems are computer based. Course covers the nature, design, implementation, and controls in computerized systems as well as manual systems. Micro computers are used as a learning tool. This course does not count towards the credits needed to graduate.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ACC 639. Income Taxation and Business Entitles. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to be the second tax course students who are interested in the business applications of federal income tax laws, as they affect corporations, partnerships, and their owners. Emphasis is placed on tax planning aspects of formation, operation, liquidation, and distributions of corporations and partnerships. Not open to students with credit in ACC 404 or equivalent.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 640. Corporate Taxation 1. 2 Credit Hours.

Course covers treatment of the corporate form of organization, its related opportunities, and problem areas, including formation, tax formula, non-liquidating and liquidating distributions, capital structure, redemptions, alternative minimum tax.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 641. Corporate Taxation II. 2 Credit Hours.

An in-depth study of taxable and nontaxable corporate reorganizations. An introduction to affiliated corporations, requirements for consolidated returns, and their associated problems and opportunities are discussed.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 642. Seminar in Taxation. 2 Credit Hours.

Investigation of current topical areas in taxation.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ACC 643. Tax Research. 2 Credit Hours.

Study of the tax practice environment including the Treasury Department, the Courts, and the legislative history of the Internal Revenue Code. Ethics in tax practice are also examined. Course includes training in the use of tax services such as RIA Checkpoint and LEXIS, in performing tax research. A research methodology for solving tax problem cases is studied and cases to be researched are assigned.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ACC 645. Partnership Taxation. 2 Credit Hours.

Taxation of partners and other flow-through entities. Partnership formation, termination, distribution, liquidation, and sales of partnership interests are covered. Limited partnerships in conjunction with their use as tax shelters are discussed as well as family partnerships, limited liability companies, and LLPs.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 647. Estates and Gift Taxes. 2 Credit Hours.

Estate and gift planning for shifting wealth from one individual to another by death, gift, or by the use of trusts. Property included in the decedent's gross estate valuation methods, gifts in contemplation of death, jointly held property, life insurance, transfers with retained life estates, bequests, revocable transfers, the marital deduction, powers of appointment, gifts of present and future interest, and gifts to minors are covered.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ACC 648. Financial Reporting Implications of Income Taxes.. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide the foundation necessary to understand the financial accounting and reporting of book-tax differences. The course will cover the preparation of the income tax provision and related financial statement disclosures in conformity with U.S. GAAP (FASB ASC 740)
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 649. Issues in Tax Policy. 2 Credit Hours.

This course looks at the process through which our tax laws are created and the important policy issues inherent in individual and corporate income taxes, consumption taxes, and wealth transfer taxes. Topics in this course are not limited to U.S. taxation and include an examination of systems used in other countries (such as the VAT) as possible alternatives to our current tax.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

ACC 650. Accounting Internship. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Student is individually assigned to operating business firm or other organization to gain insight into management practice in area of career interest. Periodic reports and conferences required.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ACC 660. Managerial Accounting in Healthcare Organizational. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers Managerial Accounting concepts applied to healthcare organizations. Topics include cost allocation and management control systems.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ACC 662. Taxation of Multinational Corporations. 2 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the fundamental tax concepts underlying U.S. taxation of international transactions. Topics include the taxation of U.S. corporations with income from foreign sources, intercompany pricing, anti-tax avoidance provisions, and tax treaties.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 664. Global Mergers and Acquisitions: Accounting and Related Issues. 2 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the financial, cultural, and strategic aspects of international mergers and acquisitions (M&A) activity and has a global, cross-cultural perspective. It presents a strategic view of the M&A process, examining managerial decision making in the planning, execution. and post-merger phases.
Prerequisite: ACC 402 or equivalent.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ACC 670. Financial Reporting and Analysis. 2 Credit Hours.

The course focuses on the analysis and use of financial accounting information in the evaluation of corporate performance. The course initially demonstrates the accounting process and resulting generation of financial statements. Building on these core accounting concepts, the course emphasizes the understanding of financial statements prepared under U.S. and International Accounting Standards and the analysis of these financial statements including common size analysis, ratio analysis, the impact of taxes, and credit analysis. Completion of the course enhances the student's ability to read, interpret, and analyze financial statements for making investment, credit, acquisition, and other evaluation decisions. Limited to MBA students and Executive MBA students. Does not satisfy any accounting requirements needed to sit for the CPA Exam in Florida.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ACC 671. Accounting for Decision Making. 2 Credit Hours.

The course focuses on the use of accounting information in reporting managerial performance and making business decisions. The course covers the preparation and use of managerial accounting information for use in planning, budgeting, control, break-even analysis and pricing, including the impact of taxes. Completion of the course will enhance the student's ability to understand managerial accounting reports and use this information in making business decisions. Limited to MBA students and Executive MBA students. Does not satisfy any accounting requirement needed to sit for the CPA Exam in Florida.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ACC 672. Advanced Financial Analysis. 2 Credit Hours.

Advanced Financial Analysis and Valuation builds on the analytical techniques developed in the basic financial statement analysis course, Accounting 670: Financial Reporting and Analysis, to augment your understanding of more complex financial reporting issues and to introduce you to the valuation of equity investments. The viewpoint is that of the user of financial statements, particularly from the standpoint of an equity investor or purchaser of a business, We discuss each financial reporting issue in terms of its effect on assessments of a firm's profitability and risk. This course is designed primarily for students who expect to be intensive users of financial statements as part of their professional responsibilities.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 673. Taxation for Business and Investment Decisions. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to be the first tax course for students who are interested in acquiring the basic knowledge that all executives and investors should have about our federal income tax system. It studies basic concepts of federal income taxation applicable to all taxpayers. The basic income tax formula is studied including income exclusions, inclusions, statutory deductions, exemptions, and credits as well as property transactions. Completion of this course will enhance the students' appreciation of the role of taxation in making investment, employment-related, and business decisions. Not open to students with credit in ACC 403 or equivalent.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ACC 675. Compensation, Incentives and Strategic Control. 2 Credit Hours.

Internal control is the process by which owners influence manager's of organization to implement the organization's strategies. They key idea is that different organizations typically have different strategies which in turn require different control systems for effective implementation. Internal control involves both formal systems and informal processes. Accounting 675 will begin by describing the formal aspects of management control such as the design of responsibility centers, budgets and standards, performance reports and management compensation. We will then explore the economic and financial reporting consequences (perhaps unintended) of various performance measurement mechanisms. In particular, we will focus on issues of short-termism, earnings, management, and attendant control failures that plague Corporate America today . Finally, we will discuss some of the regulatory changes brought about in recent times (e.g., Sarbanes Oxley) to address the apparent widespread control system failures.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 677. Forensic Accounting. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of fraud perpetrated against an organization, including employee theft, vendor fraud, customer fraud, and management fraud. You will learn how to investigate and quantify fraud, and how it can be detected and prevented as well as the accountants' role in litigation, such as acting as expert witness.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ACC 681. Introduction to Financial and Managerial Accounting. 4 Credit Hours.

The first half of the course explores the role of accounting in providing financial information about an enterprise to decision-makers. Emphasis is placed on understanding financial accounting from both a preparer as well as user perspective. Course covers the reporting of financial position including coverage of assets, liabilities, equity accounts, the results of operations, and cash flows. Topics covered in the second half include various product costing techniques, analysis of cost behavior patterns, budgeting, and the use of accounting information in decision making from a managerial perspective.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 682. Intermediate Accounting. 4 Credit Hours.

The accounting principles guiding the financial reporting practices of entities that prepare financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles are discussed. The course begins with a detailed discussion of the components of the income statement as well as the balance sheet followed by more complex accounting applications such as leases, post retirement benefits, accounting for income taxes, and other topics. Additionally, the course includes coverage of the statement of cash flows.
Prerequisite: ACC 681.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 683. Taxation. 4 Credit Hours.

The course begins with a discussion of basic concepts of federal income taxation applicable to all taxpayers. The principles of individual income taxation, the tax consequences of property transactions, and an introduction to the impact of income taxes on corporations and partnerships are discussed. Emphasis is placed on study of the basic income tax formula including income exclusions, inclusions, statutory deductions, exemptions, and credits. This is followed by a study of Federal income tax laws and regulations as they affect corporations, partnerships, their owners, and employees. Emphasis is placed on tax planning aspects of formation, operation, distribution, and liquidation of corporations and partnerships.
Prerequisite: ACC 682.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 684. Accounting Information Systems. 4 Credit Hours.

Course covers the nature, design, and implementation of accounting information systems. The objective of the course is to develop students’“”•–—˜ understanding of the theory and practice of relational database management systems in the accounting view of enterprise-wide databases. With a focus on controls, students build accounting system elements related to main accounting transaction cycles, the revenue cycle, and the purchase cycle.
Prerequisite: ACC 682.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 685. Financial Statement Analysis and Valuation. 4 Credit Hours.

This course emphasizes the fundamental techniques of financial statement analysis. Building upon core accounting and investment concepts, the course covers the analysis and interpretation of financial accounting information including the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. The course also examines the use of accounting information in investment and credit decisions including the valuation of equity investments. The viewpoint is that of the user of financial statements, particularly from the standpoint of an equity investor or purchaser of a business.
Prerequisite: ACC 682.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 686. Auditing. 4 Credit Hours.

Course focuses on conducting an audit of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards. Course covers accounting information systems, audit planning, audit risk and materiality assessments, evaluation of internal control, audit evidence, documentation, and audit reports. This is followed by discussion of advanced issues which arise in audit practice including audit reporting issues, fraud detection and reporting, attestation engagements, special reporting issues, compilation and review engagements, scope of services issues, and other new issues which have a significant impact on audit practice.
Prerequisite: ACC 682.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 687. Advanced Cost Accounting. 4 Credit Hours.

The course focuses on the use of accounting information in reporting managerial performance and making business decisions. The course covers the preparation and use of managerial accounting information for use in planning, budgeting, control, pricing, and in making other business decisions. Topics include in-depth studies of techniques and issues surrounding cost allocation methods, approaches to solving complex accounting problems, standard cost systems and variance analysis, and variable costing. Additionally, the formal aspects of management control such as the design of responsibility centers, budgets and standards, performance reports and management compensation will be discussed.
Prerequisite: ACC 682.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 688. Advanced Accounting and Financial Reporting. 4 Credit Hours.

The primary focus of the course is on business combinations and preparing consolidated financial statements. Additionally, the accounting principles and practices applied to foreign operations and partnerships will be discussed along with foreign currency translation issues. This will be followed by an exploration of complex financial reporting issues of contemporaneous interest.
Prerequisite: ACC 682.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 689. Current Issues in Accounting. 4 Credit Hours.

Current issues in accounting focuses on international financial reporting standards and accounting for governmental and not-for-profit organizations. This course introduces core concepts and tools of accounting and financial reporting for managers of global, governmental, and not-for-profit organizations.
Prerequisite: ACC 682.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ACC 690. Fraud and Forensic Accounting: Ethics & Legal Environment. 4 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on conducting fraud examinations and includes discussion ofprocedures used in forensic accounting examinations -and the rationale supporting suchprocedures.
Requisite: ACC 682 And ACC 685.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ACC 698. Selected Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of specialization.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ACC 699. Directed Readings. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Individually supervised research projects in selected fields. Approval of supervising professor as to topic and evaluation of project required at time of registration.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ACC 701. Empirical Accounting Research. 3.00 Credit Hours.

This is the first course in Empirical Accounting Research for Ph.D. students. The course introduces students to the data sources; currents techniques for accessing and analyzing accounting data; research methods employed in hypothesis testing; and the literature on positive accounting theory, accounting anomalies, institutional accounting, and disclosure. The emphasis will be on current research with a historical perspective.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 702. Empirical Accounting Research II. 3.00 Credit Hours.

This is the second course in Empirical Accounting Research for Ph.D. students. In this course, students will explore research on analyst estimates and stock recommendations, industry research in accounting, and empirical research on compensation. The course will critically evaluate the theory, research design, and methodology employed in these studies. PREREQUISITE: ACC 701 TOPICS IN EMPIRICAL ACCOUNTING RESEARCH I, OR PERMISSION FROM THE INSTRUCTOR.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ACC 823. Topics in Empirical Accounting Research I. 3 Credit Hours.

This is the first course in Empirical Accounting Research for Ph.D. students. The course introduces students to the data sources; current techniques for accessing and analyzing accounting data; research methods employed in hypothesis testing; and the literature on positive accounting theory, accounting anomalies, institutional accounting, and disclosure. The emphasis will be on current research with a historical perspective.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ACC 824. Topics in Empirical Accounting Research II. 3 Credit Hours.

This is the second course in Empirical Accounting Research for Ph.D. students. In this course, students will explore research on analyst estimates and stock recommendations, industry research in accounting, an empirical research on compensation. The course will critically evaluate the theory, research design, and methodology employed in these studies.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ACC 825. Comprehensive Test Preparation. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Doctoral students who are preparing for their qualifying examinations may use this course designation.Enrolled students must develop, with the approval of their advisor, a "Plan of Study" for these credits.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ACC 830. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Required of all candidates for the PhD. The student will enroll for credit as determined by their advisor, but not for less than a total of 24. Not more than 12 hours of ACC 730 may be taken in a regular semester, nor more than six in a summer session. Where a student has passed their qualifying examinations they may take the maximum allowable credit stated above.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BSL 612. Legal Aspects of International Business. 3 Credit Hours.

International legal framework, transactional legal issues in finance, marketing, management, distribution, and a review of theory and practice of negotiations. Case studies on such topics as legal implications of GATT, European Competition, C.I.S.G., and Export Import Rules are also included.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

BSL 624. Negotiation: Theory & Practice. 2 Credit Hours.

This experiential course is designed to introduce graduate business students to the theory and practice of negotiation. The lectures and readings will discuss negotiation theory, equipping students with the concepts and terminology to prepare and execute value-creating, interest-based negotiations. Negotiation exercises will provide the student with an opportunity to apply the theoretical elements of the course in live, simulated negotiations. Extensive review of these simulated negotiations through classroom discussion and film analysis will assist students in cementing their understanding of the use of negotiation theory in practice. Although negotiation theory is applicable to a wide variety of academic contexts, this course focuses on negotiations in the practice of law and business.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BSL 675. Advanced Business Law. 2 Credit Hours.

Advanced Business Law focuses on the following substantive subject areas commonly encountered by Certified Public Accountants and tested on the Uniform Certified Public Accountancy Examination: business ethics, contracts (including formation, performance, breach, and remedies), commercial transactions under UCC Article 2, commercial paper, agency principles, and secured transactions. Special attention is given to the areas tested on Regulation section of the Uniform CPA Exam.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

BSL 685. Legal Aspects of Health Administration. 3 Credit Hours.

Derivation of rule of law governing health providers, vicarious liability of administrative and medical personnel, informed consent, and other related problems are discussed.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BSL 690. Legal and Ethical Implications of Business Decision Making. 2 Credit Hours.

The course provides an introduction to our legal and governmental regulatory system, as well as a review of constitutional considerations for businesses. Morality and ethics are defined and distinguished. Applied philosophy is then introduced, to give the student a foundation upon which to analyze the ethical dimensions of common business questions. The relationship between the letter and the spirit of the law is examined. Specific business topics and their legal and ethical aspects are then addressed. This includes, but is not limited to, discussion of the following areas: consumer relationships; business organizations; the balancing of corporate vs. individual power (employee rights and responsibilities, employment discrimination); and the emerging ethic of a global economy.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BSL 691. The Public Corporation: Legal Perspectives. 2 Credit Hours.

The Public Corporation: Legal Perspectives reviews the laws governing the formation, operation, regulation, and governance of the public corporation with the objective of providing the graduate business student a sophisticated examination of the legal and social aspects of managing the money of others. Further, the course examines the rules and regulations governing the raising of capital from the public through the sale of securities for the development of and investment in a private enterprise.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BSL 692. Legal Implications of International Business Transactions. 2 Credit Hours.

International legal framework, transactional legal issues in finance, marketing, management, and distribution. Case studies in substantive international legal topics such as international sales contracts, international documentary sale, international terms of trade, legal implications and substantive rules governing international finance, collections, payments, and letter of credit, the resolution of international disputes with a particular emphasis and examination upon the management of litigation, enforcement of foreign judgments, and alternative dispute resolution are also included.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BSL 694. Real Estate Law. 2 Credit Hours.

Real Estate Law focuses on the U.S. legal system as it relates to the buying, selling, and financing of real property. In addition to traditional text material, the analysis of U.S. court cases is used to detail the legal factors of ownership rights and liabilities, specific interests in real property, contracting issues related to the purchase and sale of real property, as well as financing and closing the real estate transaction. The course provides a problem-solving experience, which is intended to develop graduate students' critical thinking process as well as their skills in oral and written communication.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BSL 695. Legal Implications in Executive Decision Making. 3 Credit Hours.

Law and legal process are examined as they mix with the politics and ethics of business, including the weight given to legal implications in the executive decision-making process.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

BSL 696. Legal and Ethical Implications in Executive Decision Making. 3 Credit Hours.

Business and public administration cases requiring identification of the legal, ethical, and social elements as well as the determination of the weight such elements should have in setting policy are discussed. Integration of law and ethics with public and business administration is also included.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

BSL 698. Selected Topics. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of specialization.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

BUS 600. Fundamentals of Critical Thinking and Effective Writing. 1 Credit Hour.

Critical thinking skills are developed by studying questions that transcend any single business discipline. Utilizing a variety of written formats, students hone analytic and persuasive skills, with emphasis on identifying critical issues, developing reasoned positions, and making compelling written arguments.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BUS 601. Mba Math Module. 3.00 Credit Hours.

This course provides the student with the necessary mathematical skills to progress toward an MBA degree. The course begins with a review of algebra and continues with the fundamentals of differential and integral calculus. The focus is on applying these concepts in solving business problems.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BUS 602. Critical Thinking and Effective Writing. 1 Credit Hour.

Critical thinking skills are developed by studying questions that transcend any single business discipline. Utilizing a variety of written formats, students h one analytic and persuasive skills, with emphasis on identifying critical quest ions, developing reasoned positions, and making compelling written arguments.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BUS 603. Critical Thinking and Effective Speaking. 1 Credit Hour.

Builds on critical thinking and writing skills acquired in BUS 602. Topics include oral persuasion, prepared and impromptu speeches and dealing with the media, defending one's view before adversarial audiences, display of data, and effective use of visual aids.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 604. Career Development and Enrichment. 1.00 Credit Hour.

This course will expose students to a variety of academic and industry career lectures, events, and workshops to enhance their MBA experience. The focus is to establish added-value to an MBA student through real world and relevant access to information and resources beyond the traditional curriculum.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 605. Residential Session Abroad. 1-6 Credit Hours.

One two-week session of the Global Executive MBA program is held abroad. During this corporate and international experience students attend lectures and institutional visits. This experience exposes students to other cultures and different perspectives on business issues, and widens international networking opportunities.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BUS 620. Exchange Program: IE Business School-Madrid Spain. 1-16 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BUS 622. Global Business Project (GBP) - CIBER. 1-6 Credit Hours.

The Global Business Project (GBP) is a collaborative course offered by participating CIBER schools to their MBAs and other interested graduate students. Students in related disciplines work in teams both virtually and in person on real business issues with multinational and local businesses and not-for-profits. Project supervision and final grade provided by Country Lead Professor CIBER.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 624. Asian/Pacific Business Environment- International Trip. 1-4 Credit Hours.

Course content, dates and location will vary from semester to semester at selected universities.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 625. Latin America Business Environment - International Trip. 1-4 Credit Hours.

Course content, dates and location will vary from semester to semester at selected universities.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 628. Multidisciplinary Action Projects. 2-4 Credit Hours.

The Multidisciplinary Action Projects core course (MAP) places students with organizations throughout the world to address pressing organizational challenges. Students work in teams with guidance from faculty advisors to develop actionable and valuable recommendations for sponsors. For students, MAP provides an opportunity to augment and integrate knowledge of fundamental business concepts and tools learned in classroom settings. MAP also offers opportunities to develop and test both critical thinking and leadership skills through practical experience with real business challenges. For sponsoring organizations, MAP offers access to a high-caliber team of 4-6 students, the latest business concepts and tools, an external viewpoint, and rapid turnaround. The ultimate deliverable to the sponsor from a MAP project is a set of actionable, data-driven recommendations. MAP projects are based on sponsor needs and address a wide range of business issues –—˜ from identifying new processes and improving existing operations to launching new products and targeting new growth opportunities. Sponsors come from many different industries –—˜ from alternative energy to business process outsourcing to consumer products to financial services to healthcare to real estate to telecom. Sponsoring organizations may be large corporations, small entrepreneurial start-ups, or non-profit organizations. While each MAP project is different in context, all have essential features in common. All confront students with a real business challenge of significant importance and no existing solution. All require applying concepts and tools from multiple disciplines to successfully complete. All require dynamic sense-making, fact-based decisions, and high-performance teamwork. All unfold in unpredictable ways. All conclude with teams presenting actionable recommendations to project sponsors and faculty advisors.
Components: EXP.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BUS 629. Graduate Business Exchange Program. 1-16 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 630. Fundamentals Of Economics, Accounting And Finance. 4 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of business economics, accounting, and finance. Economic themes primarily focus on microeconomic topics such as demand, supply, elasticity, and forms of competition. Accounting concepts include corporate financial statements, cost-volume-profit analysis, and traditional and activity-based cost accounting. Finance topics include time value of money, capital budgeting basics, foreign exchange, risk and return, modern portfolio theory, and financial markets. The course includes an integration of many of these concepts through an exposure to business plan development.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

BUS 631. Business Analytics And Operational Excellence. 4 Credit Hours.

This course combines three disciplines that form the basis of a modern analytical approach to business management: statistics, optimization, and operations management. Many of the concepts covered are cross-disciplinary and can be applied to a variety of business functions and situations. Although specific examples will be used during the course to illustrate each concept, instruction will focus on the general applicability of the material. Topics to be covered include: numerical and categorical data, population/sample, parameter/statistic, introduction to excel, frequency distributions, histograms, pie charts, measures of variability, pivot tables, measures of association, random variables and distributions, sampling, types of hypothesis and of statistical errors, linear programming, network models, sensitivity analysis, integer and goal programming, forecasting, inventory management and location analysis.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

BUS 632. Introduction To Strategy, Market And Management. 4 Credit Hours.

This integrated course focuses on the external environment in which business firms operate and on the management techniques through which managers organize and motivate human resources to support strategic initiatives. It emphasizes in particular three critical sets of actors: customers, competitors, and employees. The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to basic conceptual frameworks and analytic models that managers use to a) identify and understand the customer segments that make up a marketplace, b) formulate strategies that achieve a competitive advantage within that marketplace, and c) lead and motivate employees in the execution of competitive strategies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

BUS 633. Business Plan Fundamentals And Communications. 4 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the fundamentals in the development and preparation of a business plan, as well as of oral and written business communications. Students, after exploring new venture opportunities, will develop a comprehensive business plan, including its functional components (marketing, finance, operational, human and intellectual capital plans), the support with which to secure the needed financial and human resources, and the organization to manage the new venture. Students will also enhance their communication skills with which to identify critical issues, develop reasoned positions, display data, use visual aids effectively, state persuasive and compelling arguments for written documents as well as prepared and impromptu speeches, and deal with the media.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

BUS 634. Research Project. 1-6 Credit Hours.

Individually supervised research project in selected field. Scope of work must be approved by supervision instructor prior to registration. Total enrollment may not exceed six credits.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BUS 635. Research Project. 1-6 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BUS 640. Quantitative And Analytical Fundamentals For Finance. 1-4 Credit Hours.

This four-credit course provides graduate students with an intensive review of the fundamentals of financial accounting and finance, and as well as microeconomic concepts and quantitative skills, needed as appropriate foundation to pursue the Master of Science in Finance degree or other master degrees that entail taking an elective course in finance. Topics include: Math concept review (functions, exponents, notation, weighted average, derivatives as applied to maximization/minimization); Measures of central location, variability, and association; Supply and demand curves, elasticity; Profit maximization; Markets: perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly; Economic role of Government (monetary and fiscal policy, regulation, taxation); Basic financial statements (income statement, balance sheet, statement of cash flow, statement of changes in shareholders’“”•–—˜ equity); Working capital, noncurrent liabilities and owners’“”•–—˜ equity, investments and long-lived assets; Common size and ratio analysis; Principles in finance; Time value of money; Valuation (including bonds and stocks); Fixed income securities; Term structure of interest rates; Interest rate risk and duration; Capital markets, how securities trade, intermediaries; Capital market efficiency, arbitrage; Risk and return, portfolio math; Diversifiable vs. non-diversifiable risk; Asset Pricing Models (CAPM, beta, Fama-French); Capital structure; Capital budgeting; Cost of capital; Foreign exchange and global investing; Introduction to derivatives. The course will be taught over taught over a two-week period, primarily in lecture, homework, and test format.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

BUS 641. Business Analytics Capstone Project. 2 Credit Hours.

including data collection and analysis. The description of the problem in question, the approach used to address it, and the findings obtained by the group are to be described in formal written reports. The reports will be evaluated both on their quantitative value and on the quality of the writing.
Prerequisites: MAS 631, MAS 632, MAS 637, MAS 639 or equivalent.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 650. Introduction To The Miami Emba For The Americas. 1 Credit Hour.

This course provides incoming Executive MBA students an orientation to program tools and resources central to program success. Students will receive training in Blackboard, learn to access e-materials and navigate the business fundamental virtual modules, and increase their knowledge of business networking and influence. Students will also be introduced to business information resources and research strategies that they will use throughout the program. They will partake in Case Study preparation and receive an overview of the Integrated Project from Global Management, Global Enterprise, and Global Strategic Marketing perspectives. Students will also receive guidance on operating in teams both virtually and during the residency components of the program. Students will also participate in a corporate visit. This orientation also helps build a sense of affiliation among students and with the University.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall.

BUS 651. Global Strategic Marketing. 4 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the theories and practice of strategic marketing management in the Americas. This course will enable the student to understand markets, develop strategies to capture value, and develop marketing plans based on the nature of national as well as international markets. Specifically, the issues of strategic marketing in the context of firm level strategy will be addressed, as well as issues of value capture and delivery, customer life-time value, pricing, distribution, branding and communication in markets.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BUS 652. Global Strategy. 2 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to change how the strategic environment is viewed, how students think about their own organizations and other others, and how strategy and its execution is viewed. This course will help the student: understand organizations as complex systems embedded in a set of evolving cooperative and competitive economic relationships; identify the distinct resources and capabilities that form the foundation of an organization's competitive advantage; formulate business strategies that anticipate imitation and competitor response; evaluate the relationship between a firm's competitive advantage and its growth opportunities; understand the role of the corporate center in supporting and enhancing the competitive success of operating divisions; and see the interplay of organizational structures, systems, networks, and influence centers that form the basis of effective strategy implementation.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BUS 653. Global Institutions Infrastructure And Environment. 4 Credit Hours.

This course considers how a country’“”•–—˜s legal and economic institutional arrangements influence managerial strategy involving goods, services and financial flows across nations. The course addresses how economic problems are dealt with by institutional arrangements in different ways around the world. Discussions will emphasize the influence that these institutional arrangements have on managerial project strategy when firms operate across borders. Specific emphasis will be placed on legal, economic and financial institutions in the Americas.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

BUS 654. Corporate Financing And Investing. 4 Credit Hours.

This course considers financing and investing within the corporation. As such, it will consider the theoretical structure of the problem, the boundaries that management faces and how these decisions are made by management. The inter-residency portion will focus on the theoretical development and computational aspects of solving the problems. The residency portion will emphasize case discussion and simulation to demonstrate the practical implementation as well as integrating these concepts into the overall management picture. The objective of the course is to develop your understanding of the principles that define financial decision making in the firm. These topics are an important component of the strategic planning and top-level management of the firm. The course will guide you through the theory and computational aspects applying the theory, then through application to situations that will enhance and cement your understanding. Finance theory is universal and therefore does not apply to any given country or system. All of the applications will be international, multinational, or global in context. A central theme of the course is decision making. Specifically we will focus on the financial aspects of major strategic decisions. We will build on previous courses to understand how institutions, accounting, legal structures and more, affect these decisions.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 655. Public Policy and Health. 3 Credit Hours.

Development of public policy at the federal, state and local level. Policy process, models of policy analysis, policy development in several government service areas, and plans for policy change. Special emphasis on health policy formulation, implementation and the use of epidemiological tools in health policy analysis.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

BUS 656. Integrated Business Project. 1-6 Credit Hours.

The Integrated Project course (IP) requires students to formulate, develop and implement three business projects that address pressing organizational challenge, over the 17-month duration of the EMBA for the Americas. Students may work in teams or individually to develop actionable and valuable recommendations for their chosen organization and present project outcomes to faculty advisors during the February, June and October residencies. For students, IP provides an opportunity to augment and integrate knowledge of fundamental business concepts and tools learned in classroom settings. IP also offers opportunities to develop and test both critical thinking and leadership skills through practical experience with real business challenges.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 657. Optimizing Human Capital. 4 Credit Hours.

The 21st century workplace has often been characterized as the “”•–—˜Age of Intellectual Capital,”•–—˜ a time in which competitive advantage is linked intricately to optimizing human resources in distinctive ways. In this dynamic, global marketplace, Darwin rules. To survive, organizations must provide the best products, the best services with the best labor or risk extinction. Contextual factors including changing demographics; global social, economic, and regulatory issues; and technological innovations have created major challenges for organizational sustainability. In a recent publication based on survey results from 94 countries, talent acquisition, retention, management, and engagement were viewed as “”•–—˜urgent”•–—˜ global trends for the 21st century. Utilizing a variety of pedagogical approaches, this course will focus on the ways in which human capital can be leveraged to create sustainability as well as work environments that engage the minds and hearts of participants to achieve strategic initiatives.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

BUS 658. Business Analytics. 4 Credit Hours.

One of the strengths of Business Analytics is its broad applicability. The skills learned in this module can be used in virtually any context of business, including but not limited to: finance, marketing, strategy, operations, logistics, transportation, health care, real estate, sports, manufacturing, etc. For that reason, rather than focusing on a single central theme, as do other modules in the MEMBAA program, the Business Analytics module touches on a variety of themes that illustrate its potential.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 660. High Performance Leadership. 4 Credit Hours.

The High Performance Leadership course was developed to help executives build a high?performance work environment and effectively operate in the multi?cultural environment of the Americas and the World. The course is divided into two parts. The first part, the inter?residency will concentrate on the facets of high?performance leadership. It will explore the fundamentals of leadership; investigate the major leadership theoretical concepts; explore a wide?range of leadership research; convey practical leadership implications; and share lessons in conquering self?leadership. This section will be taught online through readings, discussion boards, and case and leader analyses. The emphasis will be on building a sound grasp of good practice, and on developing the ability to apply such knowledge to actual business problems. The theories will be applied to specific situations. The second part of the course, the residency concentrates on the cross?cultural environment of the Americas (and global markets) and addresses four main topics. The first session focuses on Cross?Cultural Communication in Business and allows executives to understand culturally?specific communication patterns, negotiation styles, expectations, cues, and norms. The second session addresses Leadership Issues in OrganizationalControl and participants will explore ethical and moral dilemmas, and external communications by senior executives. The third session focusses on Cross Cultural Issues in Leadership and examines effective leadership across cultures. The final session addresses Guanxi and Doing Business in China. China is currently or will soon become the world’“”•–—˜s largest economy (PPP basis) and is increasingly becoming important to the Americas. This session addresses critical thinking, cultural understanding, solutions to problems, and evaluating different options when doing business with China.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 661. Enhancing Global Operations. 4 Credit Hours.

This course focusses on how to manage more complicated global networks; how to optimize service and quality levels of performance; and, how to minimize risks yet maintain required capacities. Operational transformation requires commitment and expertise in strategy and execution to achieve lasting improvements. This course draws on research and real world issues confronting manufacturing and service companies today, providing strategic frameworks to enable executives to make smart choices so that their firms can deliver the products and services they are committed to providing their customers.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 662. Decision Making in Global Environment. 4 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with a systematic way to carefully think about decisions to arrive at more informed choices while doing business globally and specifically in the Americas. The course covers structuring decisions, creating alternatives, making tradeoffs among conflicting objectives, accounting for uncertainties and risk tolerance, and analyzing and evaluating alternatives. The course is intended to make participants aware of decision making issues surrounding global business, the dynamic issues surrounding their context, and how these affect managerial strategy. An objective of the course is to increase participants’“”•–—˜ competence in managerial decision making related to globalization, institutions, incentives, corporate governance, regulation, business law, international finance and accounting, organizations and management (including culture), and international trade.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 663. Entrepreneurship & Innovation. 4 Credit Hours.

This course considers entrepreneurship and innovation within the Americas, together with a special emphasis on the Latin American context. The course covers the building blocks of the entrepreneurial process and pays special attention to the family business model where ownership is closely held. The objective of the course is to develop an understanding of the venture formulation process within the Americas and the processes that surround this. The topics of innovation; venture capital; venture formulation; human capital; market dynamics; technological readiness; role of government, regulation, and culture will be assessed. An objective of the course is to consider new models for venture design such as the agile model of development and the creation of the business canvases, a lean version of the traditional business plan.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 698. Selected Topics. 1-6 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of business.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

BUS 801. Introduction To Commercial Real Estate: Analysis And Field Experience. 3 Credit Hours.

Students enrolled in the Accelerated MBA in Real Estate program are required to participate in a one-week, four module, on-campus class followed by a full-time internship at a local Commercial Real Estate Institution during the first summer of the program. Module I: Students are introduced to the complexities of commercial construction techniques used in South Florida and the important links between architectural plans and economic value to owners and tenants. Module II: Students are introduced to the terminology and financial analysis of commercial real estate. Module III: Students are introduced to the application of real estate finance and valuation principles using ARGUS Valuation –—˜ DCF. Module IV: Students participate in a required internship at a local Commercial Real Estate Institution. Regarded as a full-time student.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

BUS 802. Commercial Real Estate Field Experience. 3 Credit Hours.

Students enrolled in the Accelerated MBA in Real Estate program are required to participate in a full-time internship at a local Commercial Real Estate Institution during the first fall semester of the program. This internship is subsequent to their previous summer internship (BUS 700). Regarded as a full-time student.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

ECO 600. Econometrics. 3 Credit Hours.

Statistical methods for estimating and testing mathematical models of economic relationships.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ECO 601. Graduate Macroeconomic Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

The primary objective of this course is to introduce the student to the mathematical presentation of the major Classical, Neo-classical, Keynesian, and Neo-Keynesian macroeconomic models.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ECO 602. Advanced Microeconomic Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the mathematical approach to microeconomic theory. Topics include consumer/household behavior, the theory of the firm, resource allocation, welfare economics, and uncertainty theory.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ECO 603. Monetary Theory and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Current monetary theory and its use and application in fiscal and monetary policymaking. Topics include the rational expectations hypothesis, time inconsistency, and the role of the government budget constraint.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ECO 604. Topics in Applied Macroeconomics. 3 Credit Hours.

Course acquaints students with current substantive issues in macroeconomics. Topics include consumption determination, savings behavior, bequest behavior, fiscal policy effects on interest rates, consumption, real exchange rates, trade balances, and inflation.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ECO 610. Mathematical Economics And Applications. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will focus on specific applications of microeconomic theory, which may vary each semester. Topics may include choice under uncertainty, game-theoretic models of insurance markets, principal-agents problems, and basic auction theory. The discussion of each application will be preceded by a discussion of the mathematical tools required. The mathematics topics covered may include basic theory of sets and functions, concave / convex functions and their role in optimization, expectations, conditional probability, Bayes rule, and order statistics.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ECO 611. Labor Economics (III). 3 Credit Hours.

The formulation and testing of models of labor markets. The application of the tools of microeconomics and econometrics to the analysis of labor markets. Leading contributions in the areas of dynamic analysis of labor markets, human capital investment, the determinants of the wage structure, time allocation and search models, dual and internal labor market models, and analysis of government policy are discussed.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ECO 612. Economic Strategies for Firms and the Industry. 3 Credit Hours.

This course shows how modern economic techniques can be used to identify optimal managerial decisions and industrial developments. Diverse real-world applications are examined.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ECO 620. Advanced Econometrics. 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced econometric methods including advanced techniques in multiple regression, Bayesian methods, maximum likelihood estimators, distributed lag models, spectral analysis, and Monte Carlo studies are discussed.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ECO 621. Advanced Macro Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Theory of the determination of national income, employment, and price levels. Course emphasizes mathematical solutions of Classical, Keynesian, and other economic models.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ECO 625. Applied Econometrics. 3 Credit Hours.

Practical applications of econometrics are surveyed. Computer packages are used to examine economic data. Topics include the series analysis, limited dependent variable modes, pooling cross section and time series data, model selection, and rational expectations models.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ECO 633. Advanced Micro Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Theory of the behavior of firms and households and the determination of prices and resource allocation in a decentralized economy.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ECO 634. Advanced Micro Analysis II. 3 Credit Hours.

Continuation of ECO 633. Advanced analysis of theory of the household and firm emphasizing recent approaches. Analysis of decisions over time, duality relationships, advanced demand theory, risk and uncertainty, behavioral theories of the firm, and technological change are covered.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ECO 645. Regulations Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines public policies for dealing with problems arising in markets in which competitive forces are weak. The focus is on monopolies, oligopolies, cartels, and other environments where market mechanisms are unlikely to produce outcomes that benefit consumers more than the alternatives involving costly government intervention.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ECO 675. Latin America And The Global Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis of the economic, political, and social forces at work in the changing economies in Latin America.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

ECO 680. Essentials of Economics. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the core concepts of economics. Topics include allocation of scarce resources by the laws of supply and demand, use of the market place as the principle organizing and distribution tool of the economy, externalities, and market failure. Pollution of the environment is treated as a needed correction to be done by public regulation through taxation and legislation. The principal forms of firm organization and dissolution are also discussed. Applications of the laws of supply and demand are made to forecasting demand and analyzing cost structure. The entry and exit of firms and the valuation of the firm is also covered.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ECO 685. Managerial Decisions in a Global Economy. 2 Credit Hours.

Modern techniques of economic analysis and decision science are applied to the management of the firm in a global environment. Business planning and the determinants of supply and demand are an integral part of the course. The principal forms of business organization and dissolution are reviewed. The major issues confronted by the firm: Principal-agent problem (or how to motivate managers to act in the best interest of the owners, the shareholders), moral hazard, discounting of free cash flow and terminal value, economies of scale and scope, and strategic management decision making are covered.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

ECO 690. Essentials of Economic Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

An economic study of the environment in which the decision making process takes place in management and the functional areas. Structured especially for students without an undergraduate background in economics. Credit not applicable toward 36-credit professional MBA component.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ECO 691. Managerial Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Application of economic analysis to the formulation and solving of management problems and the determination of business policy.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ECO 692. Applied Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is to provide practice in applying economic principles for graduate students with a basic understanding of economic theory.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

ECO 695. Global Economics. 2 Credit Hours.

This is a course in global economics with focus on economic policies and country risk. We study the aggregate behavior of macroeconomics variables that are relevant for business decisions. We take into account the interaction of the national economy with the rest of the world. In other words, we do global economics and study the roles of monetary and fiscal policies in an open economy, foreign direct investment, and the exchange rate.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring & Summer.

ECO 698. Selected Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of specialization.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ECO 750. Research in Residence. 3 Credit Hours.

Used to establish research in residence for the Ph.D. and D.A., after the student has been enrolled for the permissible cumulative total in appropriate doctoral research. Credit not granted. May be regarded as full-time residence as determined by the Dean of the Graduate School.
PRE-REQUISITE: ECO 602 AND ECO 633.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ECO 830. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Required of all candidates for the Ph.D. The student will enroll for credit as determined by his/her advisor but not for less than a total of 12. Not more than 12 hours of ECO 730 may be taken in a regular semester, nor more than six in a summer session. Where a student has passed his/her (a) qualifying examinations, and (b) is engaged in an assistantship, he/she may still take the maximum allowable credit stated above.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

ECO 860. The Theory of International Trade. 3 Credit Hours.

This course presents rudiments in trade theory and open macroeconomics. International arbitrage as well as determination of the values of currencies and stocks.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FIN 602. Fundamentals of Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a core MBA course in our executive MBA program, devoted primarily to the area of finance. No prior background in finances is assumed. The course objective is to provide students with a conceptual framework for appreciating and understanding the problems facing the financial manager.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

FIN 603. Advanced Corporate Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

Applications in corporate finance. This class builds on the core MBA courses in our executive MBA program, especially Fundamentals of Finance (Finance 602). Topics include working capital management, financial planning, basic option valuation, agency theory, capital structure management, mergers and acquisitions, liabilities management and leasing. Note: required for Finance concentration.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

FIN 613. Intermediate Corporate Finance and InvestmentS. 4 Credit Hours.


Prerequisite: BUS 640.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

FIN 614. International Finance, Valuation, & Financial Statement Analysis. 4 Credit Hours.


Prerequisites: BUS 640, FIN 613.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

FIN 615. Financial Decision Making. 4 Credit Hours.


Prerequisites: BUS 640, BUS 613, FIN 614.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

FIN 616. Advanced Corporate Finance. 4 Credit Hours.


Prerequisites: BUS 640, BUS 613, FIN 614.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

FIN 617. Derivatives and Financial Modeling. 4 Credit Hours.


Prerequisites: BUS 640, BUS 613, FIN 614.
Components: DIL.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

FIN 618. Quantitative Finance and Microstructure. 4 Credit Hours.


Prerequitites: FIN 613 and FIN 614.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

FIN 619. Advanced Portfolio Management and Alternative Investments. 4 Credit Hours.


Prerequitites: FIN 613 and FIN 614.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

FIN 620. Investment Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

This course deals with theory and application of investment analysis. Topics i nclude general stock trading, portfolio and risk-return theory, models of stock valuation, portfolio diversification, market efficiency, options and futures, bond valuation and bond portfolio strategy, general commodity investing, and pe rsonal financial planning.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FIN 621. Portfolio Construction and Management. 3 Credit Hours.

The evolution of portfolio theory and practice and its role in modern investment management. Individual constraint models within the general capital market theory are included as well as empirical evidence, theoretical discussion, and practical exercises.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 622. Financial Options and Futures. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the theoretical development of models for pricing contingent claims in the field of finance. Application of theoretical results to the hedging of current and future assets and liabilities and to speculative strategies for the risk-averse, profit-maximizing entity are included.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 630. International Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

The financing of international trade and capital placements. Restrictions on capital retrieval and problems of international liquidity related to the U.S. and non-U.S. firms is discussed as well as current developments in international banking, theory, and policy. Cases involving foreign capital commitments and transactions, especially Latin America are also included.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 631. International Financial Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Sources and uses of long and short term capital for international business applications and foreign currency markets. Financial decisions associated with international cash and capital budgeting, capital repatriation and taxation strategies, capital exposure and coverage, and multinational firm financial strategies are discussed. Lectures and cases are included.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 641. Valuation and Financial Decision Making. 2 Credit Hours.

Basic financial valuation. This is one of the core classes in finance for our regular MBA program. Topics include the financial environment; the time value o f money; capital market efficiency; basic security valuation; risk, return and asset pricing; cost of capital; and an introduction to capital budgeting.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 642. The Financial Environment. 2 Credit Hours.

A continuation of FIN 641. Topics include an introduction to the global securit ies markets and foreign exchange, basic derivatives, real options, the securit trading process, fixed income securities markets, the term structure, investmen t banking, and short-term financial management and planning.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 643. Quantitative Finance & Market Microstructure. 2 Credit Hours.

This course exposes students to the fast growing field of market microstructure. Students will learn about different trading mechanisms encountered in financial markets today, how information affects prices and liquidity, what algorithms practitioners use to implement their trading strategies, and some basic models of market microstructure. The course ends with a brief description of several common quantitative trading strategies.
Prerequisites: FIN 641. FIN 642.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FIN 644. Real Estate Investment and Appraisal. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce students to the theoretical concepts and analytical techniques used to make a decision to purchase an ownership interest in a commercial real estate project. There is heavy reliance on Excel applications and the use of the Argus database that is a standard resource in the commercial real estate market.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FIN 645. Real Estate Finance. 2-3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce students to the theoretical concepts and analytical techniques used to make a decision to loan money for the purchase or development of a commercial real estate project. Students will complete projects that require them to evaluate the financing and investment potential of a small commercial site of their choice and to evaluate a lease vs. buy decision using a plot of land in Miami-Dade County from the perspective of a publicly-traded corporation.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

FIN 647. Introduction to ARGUS. 1 Credit Hour.

ARGUS software is used extensively in the development, financing and management of commercial real estate, especially in the office, industrial and retail sectors. The introduction to ARGUS class exposes the student to the basic concepts and terminology in the commercial real estate market and to the typical inflows and outflows an owner who invests in real estate faces over the life of the investment.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 648. Advanced ARGUS. 1 Credit Hour.

At the end of the Advanced ARGUS class the student will be able to assess the viability of detailed rent and operating expense assumptions, make decisions about the impact of financing on investor returns and critically evaluate the investment potential of leveraged office and retail property.
Prerequisite: FIN 647.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

FIN 649. Non-Profit Consulting Project. 1-4 Credit Hours.

This course is designed for students completing the Accelerated MBA in Real Estate. The course allows graduate students in real estate to synthesize and apply the concepts learned in real estate coursework to a real-life problem where the results will benefit a local organization in the non-profit sector. The supervising professor guides the students’“”•–—˜ efforts but the course topics and resources are driven by client needs and students skills.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FIN 650. Financial Investment. 2 Credit Hours.

This course builds on FIN 641 and FIN 642 to provide a more advanced knowledge of the field of investments, particularly the fixed income markets, portfolio construction, assest pricing, and behavioral biases affecting financial decisions.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 651. Advanced Topics in Investments. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is about applying finance theory to the practice of investments. Topics include building a term structure model, building a fixed income portfolio , peformance standards and measurement, and the role of futures and options in portfolios.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 653. Alternative Investments. 2 Credit Hours.

The course provides an advanced theoretical and practical understanding of various alternative investment strategies, with a specific focus on derivatives (e.g., interest rate and credit derivatives), venture capital and private equity investments, and real estate investments. The course also examines how macro-economic, technological, labor market, taxes and regulatory issues affect specific investment decisions. In addition, the students learn about valuation, investment and risk management strategies of sophisticated investors and recent chronology of events that affect market participants.
Prerequisites: FIN 641. FIN 642. FIN 650.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

FIN 655. Smif Fund Analyst I. 1 Credit Hour.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 656. Smif Fund Analyst Ii. 1 Credit Hour.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 657. Smif Fund Portfolio Manager I. 1 Credit Hour.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 658. Smif Fund Manager Ii. 1 Credit Hour.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 660. International Finance. 2 Credit Hours.

This course builds on FIN 641 and 642, and introduces students to the concepts that are important in today's dramatically changing global economy. The course covers the international monetary system; the interrelationship between national economies through the balance of payments; the economic relationships that determine a currency's value relative to other currencies and real goods; the markets and instruments of international finance; currency crises and contagion; the hedging of international risk exposure; and international portfolio investment. Master in International Studies Students Only.
Requisite: Master in International Business Studies Students Only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 661. Advanced Topics in International Finance. 2 Credit Hours.

This course builds directly on Finance 660 and on the MBA core classes, Finance 641 and 642, using a variety of techniques, including group projects an d class discussion. A number of special topics are covered including measuring and managing the many additional risk exposures faced by a multi-national enterprise, investment decisions in a global framework, and financing the multi-national firm.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 663. Ad Corporation Fin. 3 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.

FIN 670. Corporate Finance. 2 Credit Hours.

This course builds on Finance 641 and 642 and focuses on financial decision making from a corporation's perspective. Issues addressed include capital structure, management of corporate liabilities, leasing and other asset-based financing techniques, advanced treatment of capital budgeting and some of the complex issues involved, and corporate mergers and acquisitions.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 671. Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance. 2 Credit Hours.

This course builds directly on Finance 670 and on the MBA core classes, Finance 641 and Finance 642,and relies mainly on the analysis and vigorous class discussion of a variety of real-world cases. The cases cover a broad range of topics , including short-and long-term financing, capital budgeting decisions, corporate valuation, hedging with options and futures, divident policy and share repurchases, corporate financial strategy, and other current issues in corporate finance.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 674. Financial Analysis of Mergers and Acquisitions. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to develop an understanding of (1) the economic and financial issues involved in the acquisition of a company; (2) the analytical valuation tools used to evaluate an acquisition; and (3) potential and empirical stock market reaction to an acquisition. Students are then asked to apply their understanding of the issues to analyze cases involving various aspects of acquisition.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

FIN 679. Private Equity and Venture Capital. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will cover the private equity (PE) industry, composed of both venture capital (VC) and buyouts (BO). The course will provide students with an understanding of corporate finance by applying central concepts and tools to a new and increasingly important industry. The course will also introduce students to the institutions of the PE industry and the valuation process used by PE investors.
Prerequisites: FIN 641. FIN 642. FIN 670.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

FIN 681. Financial Institutions. 2 Credit Hours.

This course builds on FIN 641 and 642 and focuses on the management of financial institutions, such as banks. Topics include risk management, deposits and deposit insurance, liquidity, reserve requirements, capital adequacy, liability management, investment interest rate risk, and current issues connected with financial institutions.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 683. Financial Modeling. 2 Credit Hours.

This course takes a variety of finance topics and implements them using practical spreadsheet models. Students will use the intent and financial databases to obtain input data for their models. Students will learn Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to design functions and macros that will enhance their models. In addition to class time, this course will meet in a "computer lab" (a classroom) for hands-on instruction. Students are presumed to have a working knowledge of Windows and Excel.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FIN 685. Mathematics of Financial Derivatives. 2 Credit Hours.

This course builds on Finance 650 and 670. This course provides an in-depth mathematical treatment of derivatives and is divided into three parts: (1) options; (2) futures and forwards;and (3) other derivative instruments,which include options on futures, foreign currency derivatives, swaps, exotic options, and financial engineering. The emphasis is placed on equity instruments, although there is also some coverage of short- and long-term interest bearing instruments.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 686. Financial Decision Making. 2 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to use decision-making theory to better understand why investors, money managers, and corporate managers often make suboptimal economic and financial decisions. The first part of the course focuses on the basic techniques and models that a manager or an investor can use to make effective financial decisions. The second part of the course focuses on the psychological, social, and cultural determinants of suboptimal investor and managerial behavior. In addition, the course examines the impact of those mistakes for financial markets (e.g., price bubbles) and the overall economy. The course should be useful to individuals who work in a corporate setting or at a money management firm (mutual funds, hedge funds, pension funds, etc.).
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

FIN 698. Selected Topics in Finance. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of specialization.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 699. Directed Readings and Study. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Individually supervised research or reading projects in selected fields. Evaluation of project and subject by the supervising professor is required at the time of registration.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 705. Financial Economics I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introductory Ph.D. level course on the fundamental theories of asset pricing. Specifically, it consists of three parts. The first part focuses on individual choice under uncertainty. The second part develops equilibrium asset pricing theories, which include mean­ variance efficiency and the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), as well as the Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT). The third part reviews recent development in asset pricing by introducing some stylized facts and new theories.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 706. Theory of Corporate Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

The aim of this course is to expose students to some of the important papers that constitute the theoretical foundations of corporate finance. The course will try to give you a working understanding of the key papers and give you a flavor of the techniques for setting up and solving models, which you could possibly apply in your own research. The later part'of the course leans more towards empirical work and discusses the connections and gaps between theoretical and empirical corporate literature.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 707. Empirical Methods in Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

The objective of this course is to give you an introduction to empirical research in finance. This class is not designed like an econometrics class where the emphasis is the statistical specification of tests and the derivation of underlying asymptotics. The focus in this class is the understanding of the technique and the actual implementation in finance. The goal is to provide you with a toolbox of techniques that you can use to answer empirical questions in corporate finance and asset pricing.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 708. Financial Economics II. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a second course on asset pricing. The class is divided in two independent modules. The first module covers discrete time asset pricing models with frictions. These frictions include, among others, asymmetric information, slow-moving capital, delegated portfolio management, and short-sale constraints. The second module is an introduction to continuous time finance. Topics include introduction to stochastic calculus, derivative pricing and hedging, optimal portfolio choice, and equilibrium asset pricing.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 709. Behavioral Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will cover selected topics from the field of behavioral finance. Issues related to both asset pricing and corporate finance will be discussed. The main objective of the course is to help you identify a few interesting research ideas and execute one of these ideas into a completed paper, which could be part of your dissertation.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

FIN 715. Pe-Seminar Doctoral Students Workshop in Finance. 1 Credit Hour.


Components: RSC.
Grading: NOG.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

FIN 830. Pre-Dissertation Research. 1-6 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MAS 601. Applied Regression Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Theory and practical application of regression modeling and analysis. Computer control language, text editing, data base manipulation, and use of various data scales are covered. Understanding the role and responsibility of a statistician is also included.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MAS 610. Statistical Analysis for Managerial Decision Making. 3 Credit Hours.

Data analysis, probability concepts, distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression and correlation analysis. Required of all MBA students unless satisfied by a waiver examination or equivalent undergraduate course or courses.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

MAS 611. Principles of Quality Management. 3 Credit Hours.

The definition of quality management, its history, and comparison of various schools of thought. An introduction to the theories of systems, variation, knowledge, and psychology as they relate to quality management. Deming's fourteen points for management are studied through examples and cases.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MAS 612. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

The application of probability theory to the formulation and analysis of mathematical models for decision making. Applications are taken from inventory control, forecasting, waiting lines, quality control, production, and operations management.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

MAS 629. SAS Programming for Business Analytics. 2 Credit Hours.

SAS (Statistical Analysis System) is considered a world leader in business analytics software. This course provides the student with the tools necessary to program in SAS at an intermediate level necessary for data scientists in many Fortune 500 companies in the pharmaceutical, financial, manufacturing and health care industries.The course begins with an introduction to Base SAS software, including the reading, manipulation and transformation of data. Techniques for restructuring data files, merging and concatenating data sets, creating summary reports as well as the utilization of basic statistical procedures will comprise the first half of the course.The middle of the course will focus on intermediate SAS skills for Data Management. The topics include error checking, report generation, date and time processing, PROC SQL, SAS Graph, SAS Macros, and the ODS (Output Delivery System) for production quality output.The last third of the course will include SAS statistical procedures most often utilized by data analysts and covered in the SAS Certified Statistical Business Analyst Credential.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MAS 630. Quality Management in Practice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course presents administrative systems necessary for an organization or an individual to pursue quality management. The course presents a functional model for quality management.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MAS 631. Statistics for Managerial Decision Making. 2 Credit Hours.

This course aims to familiarize the student with statistical theory, tools, and methods required for business systems analysis and improvement. Topics include descriptive methods, elementary probability, random variables and the distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, statistical modeling, and regression.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MAS 632. Management Science Models for Decision Making. 2 Credit Hours.

This course aims to familiarize the student with Management Science tools for business systems analysis and improvement. The coverage includes linear and integer programming models, project management, simulation, queuing, and decision analysis. Some widely used software are illustrated through examples and case studies derived from business applications.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

MAS 633. Introduction to Quality Management. 2 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the major elements of Dr. Deming's theory of management, including Dr. Deming's System of Profound Knowledge and Fourteen Points for Management. Additionally, participants are introduced to "Six Sigma" tools and methods. These tools and methods have been adopted with great success by many of the largest organizations in the world, for example, General Electric, Allied Signal, Dupont, American Express, and J.P. Morgan. Additionally, the course is a prerequisite for the "Six Sigma" Green Belt certification examination.
Requisite: Master of Science in Business Analytic Students Only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MAS 634. Administrative Systems for Quality Management. 2 Credit Hours.

This course presents a model to pursue quality management (QM). It features administrative systems and structures necessary for Quality Management. The administrative systems and structures presented in this course are required to sit for the Six Sigma Management "Green Belt" certification examination.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MAS 635. Design of Experiments. 2 Credit Hours.

This course presents tools and methodology useful in conducting experiments that provide valid answers to questions of interest to the experimenter. The course discusses an overall approach to obtaining and analyzing experimental data, the advantages of using structured multi factor experiments to screen for important factors, ways of minimizing the amount of data points needed to obtain desired information, and how to identify values of experimental factors that optimize the value of measured responses. Factorial designs, fractional factorial designs, screening designs, and response surface designs are presented. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge required for proper application of these methods through many examples in business and quality management.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MAS 636. Statistical Process Control and Reliability. 2 Credit Hours.

This course aims to introduce some fundamental concepts of statistical process control and reliability with an emphasis on business applications. The first part of the course focuses on control charts and other tools that are used to monitor and improve business processes. The second part of the course introduces some basic ideas of reliability models and presents methods used in identifying failure modes in products and in business systems.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MAS 637. Applied Regression Analysis and Forecasting. 2 Credit Hours.

This course aims to familiarize the student with statistical prediction. It covers simple and multiple regression methods as well as time series and forecasting models in business. Instead of theoretical development, the course emphasize s the application of these methods in business systems analysis and improvement.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MAS 638. Management Science Consulting. 2 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to enhance students' consulting skills in management science. In addition to skills of modeling and choosing appropriate tools f or analysis, these include the communication skills of presenting quantitative and analytical material in business settings. The course is structured around a set of case studies that are based on real applications of management science models and methods discussed in MAS 631 and MAS 632.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MAS 639. Data Acquisition, Preparation And Visualization. 2 Credit Hours.

This course teaches using statistical computing software to get a better understanding of what problems can occur (and what solutions exist) when dealing with a variety of data types and sources. It will also discuss how to address data visualization and how to leverage current methods and software to best communicate with results and decision with stakeholders.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MAS 640. Applied Time Series Analysis and Forecasting. 2 Credit Hours.

Time series data occur when a single experimental unit or process is observed repeatedly over time. Data of this type are common in finance and economics. Statistical methods that assume independence are inappropriate for time series data. This course will provide the students with the basic theory and tools for the statistical analysis and interpretation of time series data. Broadly, the methods may be categorized into time-domain and frequency-domain methods. Time-domain methods develop explicit models for the evolution of a process over time. Frequency-domain methods equivalently model the correlation structure of the time series. Other topics include methods for model-based estimation, model selection, diagnostics, forecasting, and computing as they relate to time series analysis.
Prerequisites: MAS 637 or MAS 601.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MAS 641. Operations Research Models in Management. 3 Credit Hours.

The application of Operations Research techniques in Management. Topics include linear programming, PERT/CPM, queuing theory, forecasting, inventory models, statistical quality control, decision theory, and Simulation.
Prerequisites: MAS 631, MAS 632, MAS 637, MAS 639 or equivalent.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

MAS 647. Computer Simulation Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to discrete-event computer simulation and hands-on development of simulation models. Topics include introduction to queuing theory, input and out put analysis, random number generation, and variance reduction techniques. Students practice their modeling skills using commercial state-of-the-art simulation software. Assigned readings of real-life simulation projects complement the material learned in the classroom. Lecture, 3 hours.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MAS 648. Data Mining and Knowledge Acquisition. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the principles and techniques of data m ining. Topics covered include the data mining process, data preprocessing, dat a mining techniques and data mining evaluation. The course will involve a comb ination of lectures, labs, projects and case studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

MAS 649. Big Data Analytics. 3 Credit Hours.

As firms have the ability to access and store large amounts of customer and business data, they are faced with the complexities associated with Big Data. Big Data refers to very large data sets that can be analyzed to reveal important patterns, trends, and associations, especially relating to customer behaviors and business processes. This class will discuss the changes that are needed when handling, visualizing, and/or analyzing Big Data to solve business critical questions.
Prerequisite: MAS 601 and MAS 639.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MAS 650. Management Science Internship. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Student is individually assigned to operating business firm or other organization to gain insight into management practice in area of career interest. Periodic reports and conferences are required. Permission of department chair is required prior to registration.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

MAS 663. Project Management and Modeling. 2 Credit Hours.

This course considers the various methods, techniques, and software tools of project management and modeling with special emphasis on real estate projects and development. Topics include: project selection and strategy, risk assessment, conflict and negotiation, budgets, costs, and resource allocation, monitoring and information systems, project control and auditing, and project closure. The course is designed to show the integration of the various roles of owners, developers, builders, architects, and engineers in the project management process.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

MAS 680. Spatial Statistics. 3 Credit Hours.


Prerequisite: ECO 520.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

MAS 691. Topics in Management Science. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of specialization.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

MAS 692. Topics in Management Science. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of specialization.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

MAS 693. Directed Study in Operations Research. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Investigation and research in special areas of interest. Offered by special arrangement.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MAS 695. Directed Study in Operations Research. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Investigation and research in special areas of interest. Offered by special arrangement.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MAS 696. Directed Study in Statistics. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Investigation and research in special areas of interest. Offered by special arrangement.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MAS 699. Directed Study. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Offered by special arrangement.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MAS 720. Research in Residence. 0 Credit Hours.

Used to establish research in residence for the thesis for the master's degree after the student has enrolled for the permissible cumulative total in MAS 710 (usually six credits). Credit not granted. May be regarded as full time residence.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MAS 725. Continuous Registration--Master's Study. 0 Credit Hours.

To establish residence for non-thesis master's students who are preparing for major examinations. Credit not granted. Regarded as full time residence.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MAS 810. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Credit Hours.

The student working on his/her master's thesis enrolls for credit, in most departments not to exceed six, as determined by his/her advisor. Credit is not awarded until the thesis has been accepted.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MAS 830. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Required of all candidates for the Ph.D. The student will enroll for credit as determined by his/her advisor but not for less than a total of 24. Not more than 12 hours of MAS 730 may be taken in a regular semester, nor more than six in a summer session. Where a student has passed his/her (a) qualifying examinations, and (b) is engaged in an assistantship, he/she may still take the maximum allowable credit stated above.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MAS 850. Research in Residence. 0 Credit Hours.

Used to establish research in residence for the Ph.D., after the student has been enrolled for the permissible cumulative total in appropriate doctoral research. Credit not granted. May be regarded as full-time residence as determined by the Dean of the Graduate School.
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MGT 600. Managing Responsible Behavior in Organizations. 3 Credit Hours.

For Executive MBA students only. Course covers organizational behavior and utilizes cases and lectures to explore topics such as personality, motivation, leadership, group processes, organizational structure/design, and social responsibility.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

MGT 602. Human Resource Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Modern personnel administration: job analysis and design, evaluation and appraisal, recruitment and interviewing, training and development, wages and benefits, and health and safety. Unionization, regulation of wages, hours and working conditions, financial security for workers, job anti-discrimination legislation, and manpower planning is also discussed.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 603. Leading Teams. 3 Credit Hours.

The objectives of this course are to develop interpersonal communication and conflict management skills necessary to work in teams and/or exercise leadership in teams. Topics include team development, decision making, and diagnosing team process issues.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 617. Leading Across Cultures. 2 Credit Hours.

This course examines what constitutes "effective" leadership across cultures. Skills and behaviors that are perceived as effective leadership in one culture are not necessarily those that will be effective in a different culture. By exploring the ways in which specific cultural values and leadership prototypes are seen across different cultures, students will be prepared for cross-cultural adjustment and effective leadership. These skills may be applied to work assignments in a culture that is not their own or to leading diverse followers in their home country. The goal of the course is to help prepare students for leadership in multicultural environments.
Prerequisites: MGT 600 or MGT 620 or MGT 651.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 618. Leading Change In Organizations. 2 Credit Hours.

Charles Darwin aptly noted, “”•–—˜It is not the strongest species that survive, not the most intelligent, but the ones who are most responsive to change.”•–—˜ The primary goal of this course is to help you learn how to lead and manage the challenges associated with organizational change processes. Together we will identify the opportunities that require change programs; discuss ways to overcome the inevitable obstacles to change; learn how to build successful coalitions to support change efforts; analyze strategies for implementing change; and examine ways to consolidate the results of such efforts to ensure that changes are sustainable over time.
Prerequisites: MGT 600 or MGT 620 or MGT 651.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 619. Leading With Power And Influence. 2 Credit Hours.

One of the realities of organizational life is that people continually attempt to control the actions of others and to successfully influence their behavior. This reality leads to a wide array of organizational activities aimed at enhancing one's own or one's group's personal agendas. This course focuses on preparing graduates for the challenges and "realities" they will ultimately face as leaders. Given that most students will eventually be leading the efforts of others, it is essential that they understand how to acquire power and, within ethical bounds, exercise influence.
Prerequisites: MGT 600 or MGT 620 or MGT 651.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 620. Managing Through People. 2 Credit Hours.

This core course in the MBA program introduces students to some of the key beha vioral topics necessary to manage oneself and others in organizations. Specific ally, the topics covered include individual attributes (personality, perception , motivation, relationship building), group processes (norms, roles, and team b asics), leadership views, and organizational culture/change. An understanding o f the relationship between each of these areas and organizational outcomes is e nhanced through lecture, cases, and interactive exercises.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 621. High Performance Leadership. 2 Credit Hours.

Leadership skills are critical for high performing organizations. Course utilizes lecture, cases, exercises, self-assessments, and contemporary reading materials to present leadership approaches that both motivate and enable employees to perform beyond normal or ordinary expectations. Topics include followership and organizational culture, power, influence, rewards and punishments, path-goal and exchange theories, participation and empowerment, charismatic and transformational leadership, and contingency and cognitive resources theory.
Requisite: Master of Science in Management Studies Students Only.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 622. High Performance Teams. 2 Credit Hours.

This elective course highlights how to manage and construct effective teams to achieve strategic goals. Team-based organizations have been created to enhance organizational performance. The benefits of effective team leadership are perfo rmance beyond expectations and enhancement of learning for employees. Topics co vered include team decision-making, team leadership, diversity in teams, confli ct resolution, and team creativity.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 623. Human Resource Systems. 2 Credit Hours.

Leaders must manage their human resource assets effectively to achieve high per formance organizations. Course topics include recruitment and selection of high performance employees, designing performance appraisal systems, implementing policies to satisfy legal issues impacting human resources, and instituting training/development systems.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 624. Negotiation Strategies. 2-3 Credit Hours.

This course is a skills-based approach to learning the art and science of negotiation. Negotiation is a core management competency; these skills are increasingly necessary for leaders in business, non-profits, small businesses and other organizations. This course will cover preparation, and negotiation skills such as establishing trust and relationship-building. Topics covered include power, persuasion, creativity and problem-solving, ethics and cross-cultural negotiation. Skills and self-insight will be acquired through self-assessment, role-play negotiation exercises and case studies.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 625. Entrepreneurship: Creating New Ventures. 2 Credit Hours.

This is a two-credit course for MBA students (only). The course is designed to help students understand the basic essentials for creating a new venture. Among some of the topics covered will be: preparation of a business plan, securing sources of capital, choosing and creating appropriate distribution channels, and understanding the complexities of selecting a management team. Students will be required to critique and develop business plans as a key evaluation component for this course.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 628. Global Entrepreneurship. 4 Credit Hours.

This seminar-type course is an advanced elective specially designed for graduat e students either interested in starting their own firms or developing the skil ls with which to submit business plans within the corporate world (i.e., corpor ate entrepreneurship) in today's global, interdependent economy. Students will learn to assess the new venture opportunities that he/she may have considered and choose the one that seems most attractive and viable and develop a unique b usiness model which enhances the plan's viability in the short term, and ensure s the development of sustainable advantages in the long term. Each student wil l draft a comprehensive business plan after working on its functional component s (e.g., marketing, finance, human and intellectual capital plans) to be develo ped throughout nine classes and several individual meetings along the program's academic calendar. At the end, students will present their business plans to a panel of new venture investors who will assess all projects, give individual feedback, and choose the best project(s).
Components: LEC.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MGT 643. Principles of Operations Management. 2 Credit Hours.

Introduction to operations management, forecasting, process analysis, aggregate planning, capacity management, waiting line management, system design, quality management, and inventory management.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 645. Principles of Supply Chain Management. 2 Credit Hours.

Course introduces students to the business discipline of Supply Chain Management (SCM) which centers on concepts and techniques that enables firms to better coordinate material and information flows, and non-material activities associated with logistical and marketing processes that occur within and across organizations. Course also discusses concepts and recent influential innovations in SCM (e.g., Cross-Docking, Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI), Third-Party Logistics (3PL), Efficient Consumer Response (ECR), and Quick Response (QR)).
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 651. Behavioral and Organizational Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of relevant concepts, research findings, and pragmatic implications of the behavioral sciences for the management of complex socio-technical systems.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 653. Operations Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to major managerial problems and decision processes of operations management. Topics include the design of operations, planning, scheduling, quality control, systems analysis and evaluation, resource allocation, materials requirement planning, and integration of operations management with the other functional areas.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 654. Sel Top In Oper Mgt. 3 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 655. Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Course addresses the fundamentals of research in business including exploratory designs, correlational and multivariate designs, experimental and non-experimental studies, measurement theory, internal and external validity considerations, and ethical requirements in conducting organizational research.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MGT 656. Seminar: Organizational Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Seminar addresses the current research and theoretical foundations in organizational behavior. Topics include individual attributes, job attitudes, leadership, motivation, and group processes.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MGT 658. Strategic Management. 3 Credit Hours.

The formulation and implementation of strategy, from a domestic and international perspective, is explored through cases, readings, and decision simulation. An integration of all the core areas of business is emphasized. This core course is required of all MBA students.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 659. Management of Multinational Enterprise. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis of the management tasks confronting managers operating in the international arena presented from both an environmental and an operational perspective. Alternatives for overall corporate policy and strategy that accommodate global operations is also included.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 660. Leadership and Motivation in Organizations. 3 Credit Hours.

Selected topics pertaining to leadership, motivation, and individual processes are surveyed through selected readings, class discussions, and a guided researc h project. Students' ability to conceptualize, integrate, and apply diverse app roaches to the leadership and motivation of people in organizations is emphasiz ed.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

MGT 661. Influence, Power and Politics in Organizations. 3 Credit Hours.

One of the basic realities of organizational life is that people continually attempt to control the actions of others and to successfully influence their behavior. This reality leads to a wide array of organizational politics aimed at enhancing one's own or one's group's personal agendas. This course focuses on preparing graduate business students for the challenges and "realities" they will ultimately face as managers. Given that most business students will eventually be leading the efforts of others, it is essential that they understand how to acquire power and exercise power within ethical bounds.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MGT 675. Business Policy and Strategy. 2 Credit Hours.

The objectives of the course are to improve the student's ability to think stra tegically and to provide an intellectual framework that enhances understanding of the MBA program. The course focuses on relationships among the firm, its str ategy, and its environment; why firms choose certain businesses; which business strategies are successful; and how firms can change in response to a dynamic e nvironment. Models for strategic formulation, implementation, and control are d eveloped that facilitate an integrated understanding of the courses that compri se the MBA curriculum. Readings and lectures illustrate strategic management th eories and frameworks while case discussions, experiential exercises, and team projects provide opportunities for application.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 677. Corporate Strategy and Organization. 2 Credit Hours.

This capstone course focuses on the perspective and skills of the general manag er. Its purpose is to provide practice in diagnosing and identifying realistic solutions to complex strategic and organizational problems. Course builds on previous coursework by providing an opportunity to integrate various functional areas by providing a total business perspective. Since the course focus is on pragmatic, action-oriented general management skills, the course is taught primarily through the case method and requires both written analyses and case presentations.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 679. Merger and Acquisition Strategies. 2.00 Credit Hours.

This course examines the merger and acquisition growth of two sets of actors. First, it focuses on "financial buyers" (hedge funds, leveraged buy-out groups, private equity funds) that acquire with the intention of divesting the asset a t a profit in the near or medium term. Second, it focuses on "strategic buyers " (corporations or companies) that acquire with the intention of operating the acquired asset as a stand-alone business or by integrating it into an on-going opreation or set of businesses. The course utilizes lectures, case discussions , presentations, and guest speakers to examine issues of strategy formulation a nd subsequent execution.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Summer.

MGT 680. Doing Business In China. 2 Credit Hours.

THIS COURSE EXPLORES VARIOUS BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT ISSUES FACED BY INTERNATIO NAL EXECUTIVES WHO ARE INTERESTED OR ACTIVE IN VARIOUS INDUSTRIES AND MARKETS I N CHINA, AIMING TO IMPROVE THEIR UNDERSTANDING OF THIS LARGEST EMERGING MARKET IN THE WORLD. SEVERAL CASE STUDIES OF BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS AND INDUSTRIES ARE USED THROUGHOUT THE COURSE. EMPHASIS OF THE COURSE MATERIAL AND CLASS DISCUSS ION IS ON CRITICAL THINKING, SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEMS, AND EVALUATING DIFFERENT OP TIONS.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 681. Essentials of Health Care Management and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course develops an understanding of the basic elements of the health Servi ces industry in the United States. A systems approach will be used utilizing a historical perspective as a basis and moving on to current and potential futur e system dynamics. The various components of the health care system will be ex amined, including physician services, hospital and hospital systems, long-term care providers, mental health services, and pharmaceutical services. Various e lements associated with the financing of health services will be examined as we ll as indemnity insurance, capitation, and the role of managed care and consume r driven health care in theory and practice. The role of government and its im pact on our health care system will be explored as well.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MGT 682. Issues in Health Care Administration. 3 Credit Hours.

A seminar on current problems and issues in health care administration.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MGT 684. Analysis of Health Care Delivery and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines theoretical and operational incentive structures which gui de health care consumers, providers and health care organization toward decisio ns both efficient and inefficient.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Summer.

MGT 685. Economic Models in Operations and Supply Chain Management. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course we will study the academic literature that is based on analytical models of supply chain and channel management. In particular we will be concerned with models that capture the economics that govern the interaction among the firms in a supply chain/distribution channel. Since this topic is of interest to both the marketing and operations management communities, we will draw upon readings from both areas. One of our objectives will be to identify opportunities for building bridges between these two bodies of knowledge.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 686. Optimization Models For Operations And Supply Chain Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed primarily for advanced graduate students who are interested in research on supply chain and operations management, focusing on the study of (deterministic) optimization models to support system design, planning, and operational decisions. The course complements other related doctoral courses such as those on economic models for supply chain and operations management.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

MGT 687. Health Care Organization, Economics, and Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

Course provides the student insight into organizational and behavioral aspects of the various sectors and agents within the health care industry and understanding of how such aspects in turn affect performance measured in terms of both economic and ethical criteria.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MGT 688. Individual and Interpersonal Processes. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic Overview of many topics relevant to studying individuals and dyads in org anizations. Course will introduce students to a variety of topics related to i ndividual and interpersonal differences, processes, and behaviors in organizati ons. Students will begin to see how to link research designs with a theoretic al framework for empirical testing.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MGT 689. Doctoral Seminar in Leadership and Group Processes. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar examines the theory and research that focuses individual leadershi p and examines implications for individual and group behaviors as well as bridg ing the micro-macro divide. You will perform a critical in-depth examination o f the primary research literature, focusing on appropriateness of design, anal ysis, interpretation, contribution and future research directions.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MGT 690. Sustainable Business Operations: Value Creation & Environmental Considerations. 3 Credit Hours.


Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

MGT 691. International Management. 2 Credit Hours.

Course is designed to provide an overview of management problems and issues for organizations and executives operating internationally. Students learn how multinational enterprises are different, why they behave as they do, and how to apply management principles to problem-solving in such contexts.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 692. Theories in Management and Organization. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an in-depth review of major theories in the broad field of management and organization. It covers a multitude of management and organization theories that are derived not only from general management but from economics, sociology, ecology, and the like. The course will use several techniques, including lectures, article presentations and discussions, theory development, research project, and manuscript preparation. By the end of the term, students are expected to understand the central notions of each theory being discussed, comment on various arguments in these theories, improve the skills in applying these theories to their specific research questions, and sharpen their ability to develop theoretical models.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MGT 693. Theories and Research in Global Strategic Management.. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide doctoral students an in-depth review of major theories, paradigms, and perspectives in global strategy and international business. We'll also explore how to apply existing theories and perspectives to new contextual settings, such as emerging markets and outsourcing. Furthermore, we'll do all this while reading and critiquing the major brancehes and works within the strategic management and international business literature. The course is intended for doctoral students in business or related fields. There are no formal prerequisites for the course although some basic knowledge of global business is expected.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 694. Ph.D Seminar in Strategic Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide doctoral students an in-depth review of majo r theories, perspectives, and methods in strategic management. The course is i ntended for doctoral students in business or related fields.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

MGT 695. Ph.D Seminar in Emerging Market Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide doctoral students an in-depth review and stu dy of major theories, perspectives, methods, findings, and future research issu es in business and management involving emerging economies. It encompasses bot h macro- (e.g., strategic management, international business, entrepreneurship) , and micro- (e.g., culture, human resources management, leadership, and organi zational behavior) levels.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MGT 698. Selected Topics. 1-6 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of specialization.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MGT 699. Directed Study. 6.00 Credit Hours.

Individually supervised research project in selected field of management. Approval of supervising professor of the topic/scope of work/evaluation is required prior to registration.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MGT 825. Comprehensive Test Preparation. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Doctoral students who are preparing for their qualifying examinations may use this course designation. Enrolled students must develop, with the approval of their advisor, a "Plan of Study" for these credits.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

MGT 830. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Course is required of all candidates for the Ph.D. The student enrolls for credit as determined by his/her advisor.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.

MKT 639. Marketing Honors Research Project. 3 Credit Hours.

Research project to fulfill requirements for Departmental Honors in Marketing.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MKT 640. Foundations of Marketing Management. 2 Credit Hours.

Course introduces students to the analytical concepts and tools of marketing management. Special emphasis is placed on the relationships between marketing and overall company strategy, the development of a customer orientation, the integration of marketing throughout the organization, and the implementation of systems for planning and controlling the marketing effort. Students consider problems of consumer analysis, product planning, integrated communication, distribution, and pricing. The discovery and application of marketing management skills are developed through the use of readings, case exercises, and class discussions.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MKT 641. Marketing Research. 2 Credit Hours.

The objective of the course is to allow students to understand functional analysis of consumer and market behaviors utilizing statistical tools. The course will cover topics of secondary sources of data, sampling, questionnaire design, and analysis and interpretation of data. Project and case analysis methods will be used for instruction.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MKT 642. Pricing And Value Management. 2 Credit Hours.

Pricing decisions require a synthesis of economic and marketing principles, an appreciation of legal and ethical constraints, and the ability to use accounting, financial, and market research data. This course is designed to teach students how to price goods and services by providing a framework for understanding pricing strategies and tactics. While pricing strategies are taught under the rubric of many diverse disciplines, we will take an integrative approach, combining strategic, economic, marketing, and psychological considerations. Topics covered include economic value and break-even analysis, price elasticity, markup and profit margin, price bundling, among others.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MKT 644. Services Marketing. 2 Credit Hours.

Course develops skills necessary to manage companies in an increasingly service-oriented and technology-driven economy and to gain sustainable competitive advantage through delivering superior quality services. Course covers the special marketing challenges posed by the unique characteristics of services and discusses their managerial implications. The need and strategies for synergistic management of operations, systems, and people to satisfy customers in order to achieve marketing excellence and superior financial performance are also included.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MKT 645. International Marketing. 2 Credit Hours.

Course analyzes the theories and practice of international marketing management. Course allows students to understand markets and aid in the development of marketing plans based on the nature of national as well as international markets. Issues of globalization, standardization, intermarket segments, trading blocks, global marketing strategies, local branding, global branding in the context of customer movements, product development, pricing, distribution, communication, and segmentation in global markets are also discussed.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MKT 646. Consumer Behavior. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of psychological and normative principles of consumer decision-making and judgment by focusing on underlying behavioral research and theory. How people process information, make decisions involving risk and uncertainty, conflicting objectives, and imperfect information are some of the main topics discussed. The implications of consumer behavior on a marketing strategy are highlighted.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MKT 647. Advertising and Communications Management. 2 Credit Hours.

Billions of dollars are wasted every year on ineffective advertising and communication campaigns. This problem is due to an absence of a compelling strategy to serve as a foundation for developing creative executions and media plans. The course provides a balanced analysis of strategy and execution of integrated marketing communication campaigns. The effectiveness of existing and emerging communication vehicles to attain strategic marketing goals is assessed. Special emphasis is placed on advertising, sales promotions, and online communications. Current and historical campaigns are also reviewed. Course requirements include case reports, projects, and class participation.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MKT 648. New Product Development. 2 Credit Hours.

This course enables students to appreciate the systematic approach that goes into the creation and marketing of new products. Practical aspects of developing and marketing new products are included through two assignments and one class project.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MKT 649. Strategic Brand Marketing. 2 Credit Hours.

More and more firms have come to realize that their brands are among their most valuable assets. The goal of this course is to teach students the strategic significance of brands in creating shareholder value. Students should develop fluency with the core principles associated with branding including: an understanding of how to develop a brand's positioning; managing total brand experience; how to manage the brand relevancy over time; familiarity with the various qualitative and quantitative methodologies that are used to evaluate brand equity; how to achieve growth through brand extension; brand design and brand messaging. The basic philosophy for this course is to blend theory and practice of brand management. Branding is both an art and a science. Few branding situations have a definitive, unqualified "right" answer as to what is the best approach. However, when armed with relevant and comprehensive theories, appropriate frameworks and models, familiarity with past successful and unsuccessful branding strategies, managers can make better and more informed decisions that are more likely to yield successful implementation.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

MKT 650. Strategic Marketing. 2 Credit Hours.

Course develops the skills necessary to strategically manage business-unit level marketing activities in a multi-brand firm. This necessitates examining all marketing mix elements, R&D, financial and production considerations simultaneously in the context of the many markets, products, and services that may concern a typical firm. The emphasis is placed on understanding internal capabilities, market competitors, and customers. Market simulation exercise, cases, and readings are utilized.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MKT 660. Foundations of Marketing Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Marketing problems experienced by top executives are examined and fundamental problem-solving concepts are developed. Students consider problems of consumer needs, product planning, promotion, distribution and pricing. The discovery and application of marketing management skills are developed through the use of cases and a major planning project.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MKT 665. International Marketing. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis of major U.S. foreign markets, marketing policies, and techniques are discussed.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MKT 672. Services Marketing. 3 Credit Hours.

Course develops the skills necessary to manage services marketing and compete through delivering quality service. The unique characteristics of services and their managerial implications are examined. Importance of the synergistic management of operations, environment, systems and people to satisfy the customer is highlighted.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall & Spring.

MKT 675. Marketing Analytics. 2 Credit Hours.

More and more firms now consider data is one of their key strategic assets. This has made analytics an important subject for business majors. One area where firms find analytics useful is marketing. Today firms use analytics to identify profitable customers, continuously track brands, calculate optimal price promotions, test commercials and optimize media budgets across online and offline channels. The goal of this course is to give you hands-on experience with data and analytics and teach you how to draw strategic marketing insights from data.
Prerequisites: MKT 640 or MKT 660.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MKT 686. Behavioral Decision Theory in Consumer Research.. 3 Credit Hours.

The objective of this seminar is to acquaint students with important theories and findings regarding consumer behavior and to stimulate research. Students will learn how to identify important research problems, ask interesting research questions, develop theories and hypotheses, and design experiments.
Requisite: Must be registered Doctoral Student.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Spring.

MKT 687. Marketing Strategy. 3 Credit Hours.

Marketing Strategy is a vast, exciting and exploding literature that almost defies classification. However, despite this difficulty one common theme unifies and distinguishes this stream of research: it is marketing as seen through the eyes of a manager. Is it worth fighting for market share? How do we analyze competitors? Is it more profitable to introduce a new product or enter a new market? Should we build on existing relationships or seek new customers? Does loyalty management pay? Do consumers understand product quality? Can we quantify the effects of advertising and promotions? What metrics should we use to evaluate the effectiveness of marketing effort? Can we run policy simulations before committing to marketing action? These are some of the questions that marketing managers need to address. Often the questions are very broad and complex, reflecting the bewildering range of techniques that have been used to address those questions. The seminar will try to impart an appreciation of how to define and solve research problems in a marketing strategy.
Requisite: Must be registered Doctoral Student.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MKT 688. Ph.D. Seminar in Consumer Behavior and Decision Making. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with a background regarding a wide set of topics in consumer behavior focusing on theoretical models. In addition to developing a knowledge base in several extant consumer behavior literatures, this course has several additional goals. Students will: 1) become familiar with the content and style of consumer behavior research published within the marketing field, 2) develop an understanding of many methodologies and paradigms that can be used to investigate theoretical issues, 3) have several opportunities to explicate research ideas that they will hopefully be able to pursue in the remainder of the program or early in their careers, and 4) learn to critically evaluate the research of others to aid in strengthening their thinking and ultimately their own research activities.
Requisite: Must be registered Doctoral Student.
Components: THI.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Fall.

MKT 689. Information Processing for Consumer Behavior. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Broadly the study of consumer behavior is divided into two areas - behavioral decision theory and information processing. This course will focus on information-processing aspects of consumer behavior with an emphasis in generating high quality consumer research ideas. We will cover both classic papers that provide the gist of the area covered in each session as well as research that attracted more interest from scholars in the recent years.The course complements MKT688 and MKT686, which provide students with an introduction to topics in consumer behavior and behavioral decision theory, respectively (there three Consumer Behavior PhD seminars can be taken in any sequence). Each week we will discuss a topic of consumer behavior research, drawing primarily upon readings from marketing and psychology. Students are responsible for all primary readings, which will be discussed in a seminar-format in class. Each week, we will discuss 4-5 papers. Students will also be assigned to be the "discussion leader" for individual sessions. Professor will assign these sessions to the students in the first class.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MKT 695. Topics In Marketing. 3.00 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of Marketing.
Requisite: Must be registered Doctoral Student.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MKT 696. Topics In Marketing. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of Marketing.
Requisite: Must be registered Doctoral Student.
Components: SEM.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MKT 697. Topics In Marketing. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of Marketing.
Requisite: Must be registered Doctoral Student.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MKT 698. Topics In Marketing. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Topics in selected areas of Marketing.
Requisite: Must be registered Doctoral Student.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MKT 699. Directed Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

Individually supervised readings or research projects. Restricted to students with superior academic records. Approval of supervising professor as to topic and evaluation of project required at time of registration.
Components: LEC.
Grading: GRD.
Typically Offered: Offered by Announcement Only.

MKT 830. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Required of all candidates for the Ph.D. The student will enroll for credit as determined by his/her advisor but not for less than a total of 24. Not more than 12 hours of MKT 730 may be taken in a regular semester, nor more than six in a summer session. Where a student has passed his/her (a) qualifying examinations, and (b) is engaged in an assistantship, he/she may still take the maximum allowable credit stated above.
Components: THI.
Grading: SUS.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, & Summer.


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